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The (Native) American University

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:16am
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

The colonial appropriation of indigenous place names has been an abiding concern of postcolonial studies. The severing of names from their semantic, grammatical, and linguistic ties within the native language and their re-contextualization within the language of the settler creates, in a variety of ways for both colonizer and colonized, a gap between the experience and meaning of a place and the name used to describe it, complicating the colonial boundary.

The Pedagogical (Re)Turn

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:11am
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

Twenty years ago, Gerald Graff mused in "The Pedagogical Turn" that the future of theory would be in its reapplication from literature to pedagogy. In the intervening years, theory may not have reorganized the literature classroom, but it has transformed critical thinking pedagogy. The work of Wittgenstein, Jakobson, Derrida, Lyotard, Foucault, and others who have informed literary studies has recently been drawn upon by Mark Weinstein, Michael Peters, Tim John Moore and others to shift instruction in critical thinking away from general (informal) logic, which assumes a transparency of language, to thinking as embedded in language and thereby governed by varying modes of reading and writing.

Interdisciplinary Research Methods What? Why? How? Who?

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:08am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Interdisciplinary Research Methods
What? Why? How? Who?

Call for Submissions 2016
Sunday 20th March – Tuesday 22nd March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

Interdisciplinarity: What, Why, How and Who?
IDN was established in 1999 with one aim: to reinvigorate interdisciplinary dialogue. After several successful years of fostering interdisciplinarity through the organization of conferences and research projects, IDN is now turning its attention and experience to another aspect of the same work: exploring the nuts and bolts of the processes of interdisciplinarity.

Interdisciplinary Research Methods What? Why? How? Who?

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:04am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Interdisciplinary Research Methods
What? Why? How? Who?

Call for Submissions 2016
Sunday 20th March – Tuesday 22nd March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

Interdisciplinarity: What, Why, How and Who?
IDN was established in 1999 with one aim: to reinvigorate interdisciplinary dialogue. After several successful years of fostering interdisciplinarity through the organization of conferences and research projects, IDN is now turning its attention and experience to another aspect of the same work: exploring the nuts and bolts of the processes of interdisciplinarity.

Torture

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 8:23am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Torture
Call for Submissions 2016

Sunday 20th March – Tuesday 22nd March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

MODERNIST EMOTIONS - French Society for Modernist Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 6:38am
Hélène Aji (University Paris Ouest Nanterre)

MODERNIST EMOTIONS

The second international conference of the French Society for Modernist Studies
Société d'études modernistes (SEM)
22-24 June 2016
University Paris Ouest Nanterre
France

Keynote speakers:
Laura MARCUS (New College, Oxford)
Jean-Michel RABATÉ (University of Pennsylvania)

New Orleans Review: 2016 Shakespeare Issue

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 10:18pm
Hillary Eklund / New Orleans Review / Loyola University New Orleans

Four centuries after William Shakespeare's death, his name ennobles a variety of cultural institutions, from libraries and endowed chairs to summer camps and rubber duckies. Even as these structures—both lofty and lowly—rise and fall, we bear witness to the greatest power Shakespeare described: that of poetry itself to preserve without rigidity, to endure without sameness, and to inspire without dominance. Beyond the array of institutions that bear his name, what conversations do Shakespeare's eternal lines animate now?

Dollars and Desire: Capitalism, Oppression, and the Racial Other

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:46pm
Northeast MLA (NeMLA)

The history of the commodification of Black bodies within a global context has been central to the Afro-diasporic experience. While in conversation with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and colonization; contemporary scholarship grapples with what it is to interrogate the consumption of Black bodies. Working from the perspective of Blackness and commodification in Black Looks: Race and Representation, bell hooks argues that the "contemporary commodification of Black culture by whites in no way challenges white supremacy when it takes the form of making Blackness the 'spice' that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture" (14).

Digital America Issue no. 6 | Now Accepting Submissions

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:31pm
Digital America: an online journal on digital culture and American life

Digital America is now accepting submissions for Issue No. 6. We are looking for critical essays, film, artwork, design, reviews, and process pieces that question, analyze, and/or hack the tools of digital culture. We are also interested in work that explores how new behaviors and new, global networks of power and influence are shaping American life. All submissions should engage American life and digital culture and/or digitization in some way. We encourage creative responses to these parameters as we understand the complexities of engaging "America" in a global, networked world.

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Once Upon a Mother --ASECS--March 31-April 3

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:14pm
Kelli Wilhelm / ASECS,

Call for Papers 47th ASECS Annual Meeting and the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society Pittsburgh, PA March 31-April 3, 2016

Proposals for papers should be sent directly to the seminar chairs no later than 15 September 2015. Please include your telephone and fax numbers and e-mail address. You should also let the session chair know of any audio-visual needs and special scheduling requests. We actively encourage presentations by younger and untenured scholars.

CFP: Peripheral Modernity and the South Asian Literary-World

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:54pm
24th European Conference on South Asian Studies, University of Warsaw, Poland

The 2008 global downturn has compelled the social sciences and humanities to refocus on the concept of "crisis" in capitalism and rethink the relations between "core" and "periphery." What is crucial to this era of crisis is the emergence of the BRICS countries and the corresponding shifts in the world system. Debates on world literature and comparitivism have been alert to these readjustments (Moretti, 2000; Orsini, 2003; Damrosch, 2005; Warwick RC, 2015) as well as the proliferation of the neo-social realist novel (Adiga, Hamid, etc).

Managing the Adviser-Graduate Student Relationship (March 16-20, 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 5:35pm
NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association)

How are advisers best prepared to work with graduate students? How can we prepare graduate students to be, to borrow Leonard Cassuto's language, "the CEOs of their own graduate education"? What personal, professional, and institutional shifts are required to ensure that graduate students aren't infantilized and demoralized, but instead are professionalized and empowered, and ultimately prepared for diverse careers? This roundtable invites papers from graduate students and their mentors that propose answers to these and other related questions.

Please submit an abstract of ~250-400 words with a brief CV to James M. Van Wyck (jvanwyck AT fordham.edu)

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