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fan studies and fandom

[UPDATE] SLI Special Issue. Revisiting Tarantino: From Forebears to Heirs and Basterd Children

updated: 
Friday, April 14, 2017 - 12:07pm
Studies in the Literary Imagination, Dept. of English, Georgia State University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Quentin Tarantino’s knowledge and love of film and television are evident in his allusions and homages; Tarantino explains and expands upon those influences in talks and interviews, illuminating connections the audience may have missed. His influences range from Spaghetti Westerns to Samurai films, Blaxploitation flicks, film noir, Hong Kong crime, revenge cinema, American TV Westerns, and so on. Tarantino also highlights his literary inspirations, from pulp to classics. In a 1994 interview with David Wild, he spoke about J. D. Salinger’s influence on the structure of Pulp Fiction: “When you read his Glass family stories, they all add up to one big story. That was the biggest example for me.”

Johnny Cash: Arts and Artistry from the New Deal into the 21st Century

updated: 
Friday, January 13, 2017 - 2:39pm
Historic Dyess Colony:Johnny Cash Boyhood Home, an Arkansas State University Heritage Site
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 16, 2017

Arkansas State University opens a call for presentations for a public symposium in conjunction with the inaugural Johnny Cash Heritage Festival to be held in Dyess, Arkansas, Oct. 19-21, 2017. The symposium, “Johnny Cash: Arts and Artistry from the New Deal into the 21st Century,” is co-sponsored by the Historic Dyess Colony: Johnny Cash Boyhood Home and the A-State Heritage Studies Ph.D. Program.

The (Recent) Past, Present and Future of Genre Fiction (ALA 28th Annual Conference, Boston, MA, May 25-29, 2017); due January 25

updated: 
Friday, January 13, 2017 - 2:40pm
Society for Contemporary Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2017

 

The Society for Contemporary Literature, a group dedicated to the study of literature of the last 25 years, invites 300-word abstracts for presentations at the 27th Annual Conference of the American Literature Assoc. This panel seeks to explore the trends in literature of the past 25 years, especially the future of genre fiction.  Starting points for discussion may include, but are not limited to

 

  • Genres of popular fiction
  • Canons/canonization
  • Genre/generic conventions
  • Genre-shifting
  • Blurring/disappearing genre lines
  • Multi-genre literature

 

 

Framing New York City in Comics

updated: 
Friday, January 13, 2017 - 2:43pm
Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 13, 2017

Call for Papers

 

Framing New York City in Comics

 

Mary Jacobs Memorial Essay Prize

updated: 
Thursday, January 5, 2017 - 3:13pm
The Sylvia Townsend Warner Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Mary Jacobs Memorial Essay Prize

The Sylvia Townsend Warner Society

www.townsendwarner.com

invites essays on any aspect of the life and work of Sylvia Townsend Warner.

 

Aim: to encourage further study of the writings of Sylvia Townsend Warner, in honour of the distinguished work of Dr. Mary Jacobs.

Captivating Criminality 4 Crime Fiction: Detection, Public and Private, Past and Present

updated: 
Thursday, January 5, 2017 - 3:15pm
Captivating Criminality Network
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 13, 2017

29th June – 1st July 2017

 

Corsham Court, Bath Spa University, UK

 

The Captivating Criminality Network is delighted to announce its fourth UK conference. Building upon and developing ideas and themes from the previous three successful conferences, Crime Fiction: Detection, Public and Private, Past and Present will examine what is arguably the very heart of this field of critical study.

 

Transnational Monstrosity in Popular Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, December 27, 2016 - 11:05pm
Steve Rawle/York St John University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Call For Papers: Transnational Monstrosity in Popular Culture

Saturday 3rd June 2017, York St John University

 

This one-day conference will explore the figure of the monster in transnational popular culture, across cinema, television, games, comics and literature, as well as through fandoms attached to global monster cultures. It is our intention to bring together researchers to consider how transnational monstrosity is constructed, represented and disseminated in global popular culture.

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