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Netflix Nostalgia

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:29pm
Kathryn Pallister, Red Deer College
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

CALL FOR PAPERS:  NETFLIX NOSTALGIA

What do “Throwback Thursday” and “Digital Disruption” have in common?  In a word:  Netflix.  As the juggernaut of streaming services, Netflix plays a significant role in the distribution and creation of nostalgic popular culture texts, as well as the fundamental alteration of the media landscape as cord-cutting audiences migrate to subscription-based platforms offering a variety of old and new content.

Visual Culture and/as Text in the Health Humanities

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:29pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

Proposals due 21 September. Papers to be presented 28 March to 1 April in Los Angeles, California, USA

 

Lit-TV: A Two-Day Symposium Exploring Contemporary US Television and "the Literary"

updated: 
Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 2:57am
Edinburgh Napier University / Durham University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

Organisers: Dr Arin Keeble (Edinburgh Napier) and Dr Sam Thomas (Durham).

Keynote: Professor Stephen Shapiro (Warwick University)

We are seeking proposals for a symposium to be hosted by the School of Arts and Creative Industries at Edinburgh Napier University (Merchiston Campus) on May 5-6, 2018.

Elsewhere: Wandering In and Out of the Humanities

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:28pm
New Voices Graduate Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 1, 2017

J. R. R. Tolkien once wrote, “Not all those who wander are lost.” Although this quotation has experienced its fair share of "inspirational quote" status by both Tolkien and Coachella fans alike, there remains a question of what "wandering" and "being elsewhere" means for the academic community. The 2018 New Voices Graduate Conference invites submissions that consider concepts of elsewhere. How do the terms interdisciplinary, difference, and othering delineate the elsewhere of cultural studies? What do authors and texts stand to gain wandering outside canonical forms? We also invite papers that explore the elsewheres of canonical texts, as well as papers that illuminate uncanonized and/or forgotten works.

Extrapolation, Interdisciplinarity, and Learning: The Second Annual City Tech Symposium on Science Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:28pm
Jason Ellis at New York City College of Technology, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Extrapolation, Interdisciplinarity, and Learning: The Second Annual City Tech Symposium on Science Fiction

 

Date:                Wednesday, December 6, 2017

 

Location:         New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay St., Namm N119,

                        Brooklyn, NY

 

            Knowledge is indivisible. When people grow wise in one direction, they are sure to make it easier for themselves to grow wise in other directions as well. On the other hand, when they split up knowledge, concentrate on their own field, and scorn and ignore other fields, they grow less wise—even in their own field.

ACLA 2018: "The Return of Generic Criticism"

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

Recent scholarship in literary studies has witnessed a return to an otherwise perennially unfashionable topic: genre. Also the subject of the 2009 English Institute and subsequent volume The Work of Genre (2011), this proliferation of novel theoretical and historical approaches to genre has taken several forms. Whereas scholars like Wai Chee Dimock have worked to disentangle theories of genre from a rigidly synchronic historicism, other critics—for example, Virginia Jackson with lyric and Elaine Freedgood with the realist novel—have sought to foreground genre as fundamentally historical.

Frankenstein 1818 to 2018: 200 Years of Mad Scientists and Monsters: A First Call for Papers

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:27pm
Michael A Torregrossa / The Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 1, 2018

Frankenstein 1818 to 2018:

200 Years of Mad Scientists and Monsters

A First Call for Papers

 

The Fantastic (Fantasy, Horror, and Science Fiction) Area of the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association seeks proposals for papers and/or complete sessions to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in 1818 and to celebrate the longevity of her iconic characters of scientist Victor Frankenstein, “the pale student of unhallowed arts,” and his monstrous construct, “the thing he had put together,” as she succinctly describes them in her introduction to the 1831 reissue of the work.

CFP: FANS Law & Politics Studies Area

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:24pm
Fandom and Neomedia Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, April 15, 2018

FANS Law and Politics Call for Papers

The Fandom and Neomedia Studies (FANS) Association, an internationally recognized academic organization, invites article submissions to its Law and Politics Studies Area with this Call for Papers.

Topics in this area include but are not limited to:

Global Literature in the Age of Trump

updated: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 - 2:24pm
Christina McComb Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

This roundtable endeavors to assess the influence of Donald Trump’s 2016 election on literature in the US and around the world.   Three avenues of inquiry will be featured. First, do the results of the 2016 election in the US clearly influence literature in the US or worldwide?   If so, what are the main traits of this influence?  Second, are there commonalities between writing in the US and writing elsewhere following the election?  Finally, focusing on non-US writing, are there perspectives or themes that are not at all present in US writing?  Is there a global voice after Trump’s election that does not exist in the United States?

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