Subscribe to RSS - film and television

film and television

Midwestern Conference on Literature, Language and Media 2020

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 7:05am
Midwestern Conference on Literature, Language and Media - Northern Illinois University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 15, 2019

Midwestern Conference on Literature, Language and Media

April 3-4, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS: MCLLM

 

Conference Date: April 3rd-4th, 2020

Deadline for Proposals: December 15, 2019

Theme: “Vision 2020: Seeing and Being Seen”

Horrifying Children: television, literature and popular culture from 1966-1998

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 7:03am
Robert Edgar and John Marland: York Centre for Writing, York St John University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 2, 2020

Twitter: @horrifyingbook

Email: HorrifyingChildrenBook@outlook.com

There has been an explosion of interest in the impact of children’s television and literature of the late C20th. In particular, the 1970s and 1980s are seen as decades that shaped a great deal of our contemporary cultural landscape. Television of this period dominated the world of childhood entertainment, drawing freely upon literature and popular culture, and much of it continues to resonate powerfully with the generation of cultural producers (fiction writers, screenwriters, directors, musicians and artists) that grew up watching the weird, the eerie and the horrific.

Bob Dylan On Screen

updated: 
Monday, November 4, 2019 - 9:00pm
Murray Leeder/University of Manitoba
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, June 30, 2020

On May 12, 1963, Bob Dylan left the set of the Ed Sullivan Show, incensed the producers rejected his decision to “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues.” This non-circulation of his image through television provided valuable publicity and Dylan would boast of “the song they didn’t let me play on TV.” This incident stands at the beginning of an ambivalent and complicated relationship between Dylan’s persona, as expressed through his words and music, and its dissemination through screen media.

Visual entanglements in Bengali film: landscapes, moments and contemporary motifs

updated: 
Wednesday, October 30, 2019 - 4:26pm
Roshni Sengupta
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

Much like cinema worldwide, Bengali language cinema has evolved through periods of artistic highs and scarred by moments of decay and decapitation. From the euphoria of the cinematic masterclass brought to life by Satyajit Ray, showcased in the Apu Trilogy (Pather Panchali [1955], Aparajito [1956] and Apur Sansar [1959])  to the intensely political canvas of Mrinal Sen’s Padatik (1973) and Ek Din Pratidin (1979) the visuality of entire spectrum of Bengal’s social classes – bhadralok to the unseen refugees of Partition – emerge as moments of intense visual engagement.

Welty, Modernism, and Media

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:49am
Eudora Welty Society/ American Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 3, 2020

American Literature Association Meeting

San Diego, CA May 21-24, 2020

Welty, Modernism, Media

This panel will investigate Welty’s work and its interactions with multi-media influences such as advertising, film, journalism, magazine culture, music, photography, pulp fiction, radio, theater, television––that is to say, with all and any forms of media influence.  Papers may consider Welty as a modernist working with the same kinds of 20thC technological changes as such writers as Eliot or Joyce but, being a Mississippi woman meeting and appreciating change, possibly defining a different relationship to the modern

(Im)possibility: Harvard Film and Visual Studies Graduate Conference

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:41am
Department of Art, Film and Visual Studies, Harvard University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS: (IM)POSSIBILITY
Graduate Student Conference
Department of Art, Film and Visual Studies
Harvard University
April 9–10, 2020

(Im)possibility marks a limit of available information, a threshold of representation, a cessation of action. Thinking at the limits of the possible gives rise to a specific set of issues: how might we articulate that which cannot be said? How might we orient ourselves toward that for which no available theory or representation is adequate?

Call for Book Chapters on Mythological Equines in Film

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:41am
Northwestern State University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

Call for Book Chapters on Mythological Equines in Film
Vernon Press invites chapter proposals on the theme: Mythological Equines in Film for an edited collection of the same name in the series Equine Creations: Imagining Horses in Literature and Film, edited by Rachel L. Carazo (Northwestern State University).

Transgressive Women in Speculative Fiction

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:39am
Valerie Guyant (Dept of Languages and Literature, Montana State University - Northern, US) Tamara Watkins (School of the Arts, Virginia Commonwealth University, US)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 29, 2019

Valerie Guyant (Dept of Languages and Literature, Montana State University - Northern, US) valerie.guyant@msun.edu

 

Tamara Watkins (School of the Arts, Virginia Commonwealth University, US) watkinst2@vcu.edu

 

The editors are currently soliciting abstract submissions for an edited volume focusing on Transgressive Women in Speculative Fiction.

 

Call for Abstracts: Critically Reading "The Vampire Diaries"

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:38am
Book Publication
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

Vampires are a phenomenon that have captivated humans since ancient times, and continue to globally fascinate different target audiences. From vampires in early Chinese traditions to their depiction in early poems such as “The Vampire” by Heinrich August Ossenfelder, to Lord Byron’s “The Vampyre”, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, to vampires in more recent TV series and movies, this creature has not only evoked fear and horror but has also embodied both anxieties as well as desires of the culture and time in which it was created. Consequently, as vampire narratives today have started to go beyond the realms of horror, sometimes even turning the vampire into romantic heroes, they bring new insights to current issues across various fields.

 

CFP:Insecure, Awkward, and Winning: Intersectionality of Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Works of Issa Rae

updated: 
Sunday, November 3, 2019 - 6:36am
LaRonda Sanders-Senu/ Gordon State College
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 2, 2019

Call for Contributors

 Insecure, Awkward, and Winning: Intersectionality of Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Works of Issa Rae

 

Edited by: Adria Y. Goldman, Ph.D., Joanna L. Jenkins, Ph.D., Andre Nicholson, Ph.D. and LaRonda Sanders-Senu, Ph.D.

 

“I was like, ‘Yo is something wrong with me? That the whole society seems to think that people like me don’t exist?’ And part of what inspired me, was this deep desire that before I died, I would make some mirrors so that kids like me might see themselves reflected back and might not feel so monstrous for it.”

Pages