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North American Literature and the Environment. Deadline Oct. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 2:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jim Daems
contact email: 

I am putting together a proposal for a collection of essays for the North American Literature and the Environment, 1600-1900 series for Ashgate. The book will focus on the 16th and 17th centuries, and particularly on how religious views of the period, be they Puritan or Church of England, for example, play a role in how the environment or the colonial enterprise is represented in the work(s) of an author or authors. I am also thinking of such representation in a way that can consider broader categories beyond just theology—gender, sexuality, race, ecocriticism, etc. Topics could include, but are not limited to:
How does a particular religious worldview influence a writer's representation of the North American environment?

[REMINDER] Immigrant Narratives and U.S. Racial Identities, NeMLA 2016. DEADLINE SEPT. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 1:14pm
full name / name of organization: 
Hardeep Sidhu / University of Rochester
contact email: 

America's unique—and largely implicit—system of racial identification is one of many complex institutions that newly arrived immigrants must navigate. Recent literature about immigration (e.g., Adichie, Americanah [2013], Sharma, Family Life [2014]) highlights this steep learning curve alongside more overt challenges like language and customs. Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words about narratives from any period in which immigrants negotiate racial categories in the United States.

This panel will be part of the 47th annual Northeast Modern Language Association Convention in Hartford, CT (March 17-20, 2016).

The deadline for abstract submissions is September 30, 2015.

[REMINDER] Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:37am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

[FINAL REMINDER] NeMLA 2016 Panel: On the Limits of Computational Analysis in the Humanities (DUE BY SEPTEMBER 30, 2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:00am
full name / name of organization: 
Dr. Jonathan M. Dickstein / Northeast Modern Language Association

The following will be a panel at the 2016 NeMLA in Hartford, CT. Abstracts must be submitted by next Wednesday, September 30, 2015. Please follow the instructions at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15986.

Direct an inquires to the panel's chair, Dr. Jonathan Dickstein, at Jonathan.Dickstein@alumni.cgu.edu.

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 10:55am
full name / name of organization: 
Postcolonial Studies@ Emory
contact email: 

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

Postcolonial Studies @Emory: https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/postcolonialstudies/
Faculty Developer: Deepika Bahri, Deepika [dot] bahri [at] emory [dot] edu
Book Review Editor: Caroline Schwenz, cschwen [at] emory [dot] edu

Postcolonial Studies @ Emory is a long standing website that aims to create a more inclusive digital community for postcolonial studies scholars across the globe. Our website accepts book review submissions as well as summaries of important postcolonial works for our Digital Bookshelf.

NCTE Affiliate MEJ seeks essays for 2015-2016 issue

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 7:50am
full name / name of organization: 
Minnesota English Journal / Minnesota Council of Teachers of English

Minnesota English Journal
Call for Submissions 2015-16

Editors: Scott Hall (Irondale High School) and Michael MacBride (Minnesota State University)

MEJ, the online journal of the Minnesota Council of Teachers of English, publishes scholarly articles, personal narratives, opinion/position pieces on topical teaching issues, short creative work (mostly poetry), and pieces focused on pedagogical strategies of major interest to English and Language Arts teachers of all instructional levels.

The Canadian Postmodern Creative: Constructing Home and Identity in the City. [Deadline: Sept. 30, 2015]

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 6:36am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) / March 17-20, 2016 - Hartford, CT
contact email: 

The Canadian Postmodern Creative: Constructing Home and Identity in the City (Creative)

Creative Writing, Editing and Publishing / Canadian

Chair(s)
Kristen Smith (University of York)

Puneet Dutt (Ryerson University)

Abstract

Writers of fiction, poetry, and drama are encouraged to submit a selection of creative prose (a 250-word abstract) concerning the Postmodern aesthetic, urbanization, or the construction of home and identity for a fifteen-minute presentation.

Submit here: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15861

Description

Edited Collection on the Portrayal of Black Men in Reality TV (Nov 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 7:27pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jervette R. Ward, Ph.D. / University of Alaska Anchorage
contact email: 

Contributions are being sought for a proposed edited collection that explores the portrayals of Black men in reality television. This collection aims to address representations of masculinity, comparisons to Black women in reality TV, class issues, queer theory, masculine psychology, patriarchal constructions, sexuality, invisibility, respectability, and social activism or lack of activism. This collection, tentatively titled There's No Blachelor: Portrayals of Black Men in Reality TV, is a follow-up to the book Real Sister: Stereotypes, Respectability, and Black Women in Reality TV (Rutgers University Press Oct/Nov 2015 - http://bit.ly/1NL1HdV ).

CFP Traveling With Gulliver, around Campus--Teaching Tools

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 5:55pm
full name / name of organization: 
Joel Sodano, University at Albany & Michael Brown, University of Aberdeen

This call for proposals is inspired by the versatile, prescient and even protean prose of Dr. Swift's most well-known work, Gulliver's Travels (1726). If Gulliver had a "tenure home" it would definitely be in the department of English; however, because of its relevance to so many disciplinary fields (economics, history, philosophy, to name the most obvious) Gulliver's Travels is finding itself in an increasingly interdisciplinary range of college courses. This CFP seeks a variety of pedagogy-oriented submissions that give insight into the ways Gulliver's Travels is taught in higher education.

International Conference Fictional Maps

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 3:01pm
full name / name of organization: 
Facta Ficta Research Centre & Silesian University in Katowice
contact email: 

Mapping the imaginary has always been a challenge for world-building and storytelling alike. Map of the fictional world subverts the very essence of an actual cartography: it represents a territory that cannot be discovered or traversed in a non-fictional realm and yet it delivers much more than a usual map: a promise of the journey into unknown. An exquisitely quotable phrase coined by J. R. R. Tolkien, who claimed to "start writing with a map and [then] make the story fit" is only reprising what have always been evident to cartographers and creators of imaginary worlds: maps precede territories and are inevitably becoming the most essen¬tial part of modern and postmodern storyworlds.

Australian Narratives in Film and Literature: Critical Perspectives

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 2:58pm
full name / name of organization: 
Ilha do Desterro (Brazil)
contact email: 

Ever since the early days of British occupation of Australia, there has been a major concern in finding a balance between the colonial ways of looking to the land and the difficulty, if not impossibility, of dealing with the vastness of the Australian territory and the diversity of its native peoples. Such tensions, far from being resolved, have created a literary and filmic system which reflects the multiplicity of approaches and constructions of Australian land and culture and whose examples, unfortunately, do not reach the non-English-speaking world as they should.

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