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Unsettling Objects: Collecting in Nineteenth-Century America

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 10:16am
full name / name of organization: 
Reed Gochberg / C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists
contact email: 

This proposed panel for the 2016 C19 conference seeks paper proposals on the topic of collectors and collections in nineteenth-century American culture. In keeping with the conference's theme of "Unsettling," this panel aims to explore how examining practices of collecting opens up new approaches to considering American literature in relation to institutions, print and material culture, and scientific study. How does literature engage with the efforts of individual collectors or institutions to organize texts, natural specimens, material objects, and other forms of information? How did competing taxonomies unsettle existing modes of categorizing objects?

From Experiential to Expository: A Roundtable

updated: 
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 - 8:07am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email: 

By extending the learning environment beyond the classroom's boundaries, undergraduate programs have stimulated lively pedagogical innovation across general education disciplines. The approach encourages rigorous critical thought via assignments that require students to think critically and to reflect actively on links between course materials, historical sites, and concrete social and cultural concerns. However, the popularity for the experiential, fed by administrative and parental enthusiasm, may hinder instructors and encumber students.

"Remeasuring Lyrical Pain" -- Seminar CFP -- ACLA Annual Meeting, Cambridge, MA, March 17–20, 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 10:30pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jessica Tabak / Brown University
contact email: 

In recent scholarship, lyric emerges as a privileged form for expressing, simulating, and circulating pain: its formal flexibility, non-narrative structure, and somatic elements allow lyric to evoke an embodied sensation whose "resistance to language," as Elaine Scarry memorably argues, "is essential to what it is." Yet these characteristics do not adhere neatly to lyric. Not all lyrics are formally free and non-narrative. Furthermore, various literary genres employ the formal invention, non-narrative digressions, and somatic elements most often identified with the lyric form.

ICFA 37 "Wonder Tales" Children's and Young Adult Literature and Art Division

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 8:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
The International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts
contact email: 

Wonder Tales
March 16-20, 2016
Marriott Orlando Airport Hotel
Deadline: October 31

The Children's and Young Adult Literature and Art Division (CYA) invites you to join us for ICFA 37, when our theme will be "Wonder Tales." Folklorists often use this term to refer to the stories commonly known as "fairy tales" due to the genre's emphasis on the marvelous and its invocation of wonder, but what is wonder and where can it be found? Many events, characters, or objects generate a response of wonder— transformations and resurrections — but wonder also may be generated in technological advances and from the "sense of wonder" in science fiction.

Jews and Christian Materiality 51st International Congress in Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 12-15, 2016)

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:43pm
full name / name of organization: 
Shamma Boyarin
contact email: 

In the conclusion to her Christian Materiality (2011), Caroline Walker Bynum opens the door to an expansion of her discussion of medieval materiality and religion to Judaism and Islam: "Understanding the full materiality of Christian belief and practice," she says, "may help to clarify at least one of the ways [i.e., the material way] in which medieval Christianity (and, in certain aspects, its modern descendants) is similar to, yet differs from, its sister religions, Islam and Judaism" (273). This session proposes to go beyond Bynum's brief concluding survey, focusing specifically on the relationship between Judaism and Christianity.

JEWISH WOMEN IN MEDIEVAL ENGLAND (ROUNDTABLE) - KALAMAZOO, 12-15 MAY 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 4:34pm
full name / name of organization: 
Adrienne Williams Boyarin (University of Victoria)
contact email: 

It is generally accepted that there are few post-biblical Jewish women in medieval Christian art. When they are depicted, their Jewishness is usually unmarked; where they appear in narrative, they are often passive or eventual converts; they lack the anti-Jewish stereotypes so often associated with Jewish males. Sara Lipton has argued that this is partly because "the Jewess's femaleness trumped her Jewishness" ("Where are the Jewish Women?" in Dark Mirror, 2014). At the same time, Jewish women are ubiquitous in the legal and historical records of twelfth- and thirteenth-century England.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

Call for essay proposals: edited collection on Modernist Studies

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm
full name / name of organization: 
Noelia Malla
contact email: 

Ezra Pound's proclamation to 'Make it new' traced the quintessential phrase of the modernist period in Literature and the Arts. Whilst the work of James Joyce perhaps embodies Pound's phrase more than any other modernist writer, testifying to the fearlessness of the true literary revolutionary, we will also be looking at a number of key writers of the period. This volume will look at the form, context, and development of literary modernism by considering prominent writers of the period: Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, T S Eliot, Wyndham Lewis, Ezra Pound, and Virginia Woolf (among others).

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm
full name / name of organization: 
UCLA

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

"Ruined!" On Failed Adaptations from Page to Screen | NeMLA 2016 (Abstract Submission Deadline: September 30, 2015)

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 12:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association

This session will explore adaptations that fail in some way. Among our goals, we would like to identify what could be productive about failed adaptations. How do such failures identify what not to do, and can an adaptation that fails to be faithful to its source material still produce a valuable, worthwhile text? We are particularly interested in proposals that look at the adaptation of older artistic and literary forms in online and/or interactive content.

Submit abstracts (300 words maximum) by September 30, 2015, to Session ID#15658 at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15658

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Willa Cather as Modernist, 9/30/15; 3/17-3/20/16

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 11:56am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Assoc (NeMLA)
contact email: 

This panel for the NeMLA 2016 Annual Convention, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, from March 17 to March 20, 2016, will feature papers that explore Willa Cather as a Modernist writer. Fresh readings of any of Cather's works are welcome.

1968 and Global Cinema - panel at SCMS Atlanta 2015 - Abstracts due AUG 5

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:46am
full name / name of organization: 
Society for Cinema and Media Studies

CfP- 2016 SCMS - 1968 + Global Cinema - 3/30-4/3/16 - Atlanta, Georgia

1968 and Global Cinema

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference

Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

Although scholarship exists on the late 1960s New Waves, especially on in French New Wave vis-à-vis May '68 in Paris, scholarship that puts cinemas on 1968 into dialogue with one another across national boundaries is surprisingly lacking.

Gender and Emotion: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2016, University of Hull, 6th - 8th January 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:27am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Hull
contact email: 

The grief-stricken faces at Edward's deathbed in the Bayeux Tapestry; the ambiguous 'ofermod' in The Battle of Maldon; the body-crumpling anguish of the Virgin witnessing the Man of Sorrows; the mirth of the Green Knight; the apoplectic anger of the mystery plays' Herod and the visceral visionary experiences of Margery of Kempe all testify to the ways in which the medieval world sought to express, perform, idealise and understand emotion.

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