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The New and the Novel in the 19th Century/New Directions in 19th-Century Studies April 13-16, Lincoln, Nebraska

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 2:22pm
full name / name of organization: 
Nineteenth Century Studies Association
contact email: 

We invite papers and panels that investigate any aspect of the new and the novel in the long 19th century, including forms and genres (song cycles, photography, "loose baggy monsters"), fashions and roles (the dandy, crinoline, Berlin wool work), aesthetics (Pater, panoramas), the old made new (Graecophilia, dinosaurs), crimes and vices (serial murder, racial science), faiths (Mormons, Positivists), geographies (frontiers, the source of the Nile), models of heroism (Custer, Byron, F. Nightingale), times (railroad tables, the eight-hour-day), psychologies (phrenology, chirology, Freud), attractions (the Great Exhibition, sensation fiction, Yellowstone), and anxieties (Chartism, empire).

[UPDATE] Literature and Tourisms of the Long Nineteenth Century - due date extended to June 19 2015

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 1:27pm
full name / name of organization: 
_LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_
contact email: 

According to the OED, the word tourism enters the English lexicon at the dawn of the nineteenth century, thus institutionalizing the notion that travel is a necessary component of personal development. As crowds of earnest bourgeois travelers displaced the solitary young aristocrat on the Grand Tour a vast body of literature concerned with both mundane and exalted facets of foreign places cropped up to fulfill a new set of needs. Owing to the diversity of places to which individuals traveled and the many different reasons for doing so, these needs were diverse and multiform.

More Matter with Less Art? Literature & the Other Arts in Early Modern England [SAMLA 87] [ABSTRACTS DUE JUNE 15]

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 12:51pm
full name / name of organization: 
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
contact email: 

How did poetry, theater, music, visual art, dance, architecture, and other forms of art coexist in the English-speaking world during the Early Modern period? This panel invites papers concerning the intersections of literature and the other arts during the 16th and early 17th centuries.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to: the influence of religion on artistic production, the use of music in the public theater and beyond, representations of courtly masques, the musicality of verse, representations of architecture in literature, etc.

SAMLA 87 will be held from November 13-15, 2015, in Durham, NC.

SAMLA Special Session: Transforming Text and Images in Ovid's Metamorphoses

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 10:03am
full name / name of organization: 
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This panel will discuss representations of vignettes from Ovid's Metamorphoses, focusing on illustrated editions, graphic literary representations, and other visuals. Ovid's epic naturally lent itself to visual representation, both affected by prior artwork and affecting subsequent art depicting Roman mythology. An ethically problematic poem, the Metamorphoses was received with anxiety, particularly for the dangerous lessons it could impart to vulnerable audiences, which resulted in adaptations that transformed image and text to guide readers' interpretations.

Victorian Culture and the Origin of Disciplines

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 7:08am
full name / name of organization: 
Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, Durham University
contact email: 

Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies One-Day Conference
12 March 2016
Durham University, UK

Keynote Address: Professor Bernard Lightman (York University, Canada)

[UPDATE - EXTENDED DEADLINE] Relations and Networks in Indian Ocean Writing

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 5:12am
full name / name of organization: 
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain

EXTENDED DEADLINE - JULY 3rd
The Indian Ocean needs to be regarded as a unifying element, connecting peoples and events across the ocean and at the same time a divisive element that fragments and distances communities through space and time. It is a mine of cultural experience with multiple connections that link the countries of its western shores with the Indian subcontinent. We invite papers that focus on the relations and networks that bind the communities that inhabit the shores of the Indian Ocean and which generate debate on notions of integration and fragmentation in Indian Ocean writing.

Suggested topics for discussion include:

Seeking Chapters for Fantastic Cities: American Urban Spaces in Science Fiction & Fantasy (Abstract Deadline = July 15, 2015)

updated: 
Monday, June 1, 2015 - 4:32am
full name / name of organization: 
Stefan Brandt, Michael Fuchs, and Stefan Rabitsch

Basin City, Caprica City, Coruscant, Gotham City, Mega-City One, Metropolis, Nos Astra, the Sprawl, and so on—SFF teems with iconic urban environments. These cities serve as geographical backdrops, but also provide, as Vivian Sobchack has argued, the "premises for the possibilities and trajectory of narrative action." Yet while Sobchack claims that representations of fantastic urban spaces depict "the failure of modernism's aspirations in images that speak of urban exhaustion, postmodern exhilaration, and millennial vertigo," in SFF, cities also embody unlimited possibilities, transcultural ideals, and utopian dreams. Cities thus function both as beacons of progress and freedom and as harbingers of decay and destruction.

NEASECS 2015 (Oct 8-10) Panel on "The Death of Allegory?"

updated: 
Sunday, May 31, 2015 - 9:51pm
full name / name of organization: 
Jason J. Gulya
contact email: 

The treatment of post-Renaissance allegory by literary scholars has been consistently negative. Scholars continue to write about the "demise," "abandonment," or "shattering" of allegory during the eighteenth century, as writers purportedly move away from the abstraction of generalization of allegory and towards the concreteness and demonstrability of literal narrative. This panel is dedicated to revisiting the relationship between allegory and the eighteenth century, since the literary form (whether it is understood as a distinct genre or as a mode of writing that can be evoked occasionally) does not go away. Potential panelists are encouraged to submit proposals for any paper investigating the status or role of allegory during the Enlightenment.

[UPDATE] Eudora Welty and Intertextuality | due June 10, 2015, conference Nov. 13-15 2015

updated: 
Sunday, May 31, 2015 - 8:48pm
full name / name of organization: 
SAMLA - Eudora Welty Society
contact email: 

Keeping with the conference theme of Literature and the Other Arts, The Eudora Welty Society invites papers that explore multimodality and interdisciplinary collaboration within the works of Eudora Welty. What elements in Welty's fiction, essays, or photography connect to her contemporary moment or a timeless part of human nature? Examples might concern the role of and engagement with politics, jazz and the blues, newspaper and magazine, television and film, translation of oral fairy tales into a written medium or Welty's Robber Bridegroom into a play.

Religion and American Literature Panel (PAMLA, Portland, Oregon; 11/6-11/8, 2015) Extended deadline for Proposal 6/10

updated: 
Sunday, May 31, 2015 - 5:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
contact email: 

Religion and American Literature panel at PAMLA seeks papers that address how questions of faith have shaped literary works and cultural meanings. How do American writers negotiate faith or unbelief? What are the varieties of secularism articulated in their work? How do they explore faith within a post-secular context? The panel especially welcomes papers on the following authors: Cormac McCarthy, Marilynn Robinson, and Jeffrey Eugenides.

[UPDATE] Final CFP: Disability and Human Rights - special issue of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

updated: 
Sunday, May 31, 2015 - 4:24pm
full name / name of organization: 
Gian Maria Greco / Elena Di Giovanni (University of Macerata, Italy)

Apologies for cross-posting.

Final Call for Papers.
Deadline: August 1, 2015.

Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies
Call for Papers: Disability and Human Rights
Guest editors: Gian Maria Greco and Elena Di Giovanni

This special issue of JLCDS will investigate issues of disability rights within the human rights agenda from the points of view and methodologies of cultural studies.

American Travelers and the City, New Orleans, Sept 10-11, proposals due June 27

updated: 
Sunday, May 31, 2015 - 1:30pm
full name / name of organization: 
American Literature Association Society for the Study of American Travel Writing
contact email: 

Panel: American Travelers and the City
Organizer: Society for the Study of American Travel Writing
Event: ALA Symposium on The City in American Literature
Details: Sept 10-11, 2015 New Orleans, LA
Proposals: Due June 27, 2015 to Andrew Vogel

The Society for the Study of American Travel Writing is organizing a panel for the American Literature Association Symposium on The City in American Literature to be held in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 10-11, 2015. More information is available at The City in American Literature Symposium.

[UPDATE] Claudia Emerson: In Memoriam [Abstract due 6/10 for SAMLA 11/13-15]

updated: 
Sunday, May 31, 2015 - 10:15am
full name / name of organization: 
Lynne M. Simpson / College English Association
contact email: 

Claudia Emerson, 2006 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry winner for her collection Late Wife and former Poet Laureate of Virginia, passed away last year at the age of 57 after a valiant struggle against cancer. She and her husband, Kent Ippolito, a musician, wrote songs together and performed. Emerson's work, then, embodies this year's SAMLA theme of "In Concert: Literature and the Other Arts." This panel seeks to celebrate her life, so papers on any element of her art are most welcome. Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words and any A/V requirements to Lynne M. Simpson, Prof. of English, Presbyterian College, at lsimpson@presby.edu by June 10.

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