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THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets / Aug 25 Submission

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 4:53pm
Lauren Kimball and Caolan Madden (Rutgers University) for C19 Conference 2016

THE "POETESS" IRL: The World, Work, and Performances of Nineteenth-Century Women Poets

What was the nineteenth-century woman poet like in real life? This panel seeks to unsettle current definitions by attending to her performing/reforming body and the work she did in the material world.

Trans/forming the Digital Humanities: Disciplinary Borders, Digital Frontiers

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 1:29pm
NeMLA 2016 - Hartford, Connecticut

Literary studies finds itself today at a double crossroads: as trans-formative digital humanities practice becomes increasingly accepted and visible in our research and curricula, so, even in more traditional methods of inquiry, has the unit of the "trans-" gained traction. Transnational, transatlantic, trans-periodic, transgender, and translational issues, to name but a few, increasingly structure and energize our readings and re-readings of literary texts. With this panel, we seek to move beyond a ruptural understanding of DH, with its underlying anxiety about disciplinary change, and to explore instead the potential continuities between humanities computing and existing methods.

Narratives of Forgetting and the Forgetting of Narratives - ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:29pm
Rutgers Program in Medieval Studies

Working forward from Mary Carruthers' foundational work on the construction of memory structures, this panel seeks to understand medieval priorities of what to remember and what to forget. Its central goal is to explore the ways in which people created, consumed, and destroyed memories in order to communicate information and ideas. It responds to recent work on the manipulation of memories of the past, which was often involved in defining nationhood and group identity.

The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century Medicine (March 10-13, 2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:24pm
INCS 2016 (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies)

From sympathetic contagion to animal magnetism, nervous physiology to cell theory and germ theory, nineteenth-century medical theory and practice imagined human embodiment in open relation to the environmental, economic, religious, and political forces that shape historical experience. Often represented in both cultural and physiological terms, disease functioned as both sign and symptom of the irrevocable togetherness of mind and body, something to be combatted morally and technologically by prudence and enlightened reason.

International Conference on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer (ICMFHT'16)

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 11:50am
International ASET Inc

The International Conference on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer (ICMFHT'16) aims to become the leading annual conference in fields related to multiphase flow and heat transfer. The goal of ICMFHT'16 is to gather scholars from all over the world to present advances in the relevant fields and to foster an environment conducive to exchanging ideas and information. This conference will also provide an ideal environment to develop new collaborations and meet experts on the fundamentals, applications, and products of the mentioned fields.

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference 17th-19th August, 2016, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 11:40am
Romance in Medieval Britain Biennial conference

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference
17th-19th August, 2016
University of British Columbia, Vancouver

In the summer of 2016, the 15th Biennial Romance in Medieval Britain Conference will be hosted for the first time outside of the British Isles and Ireland. The Romance in Medieval Britain Conferences address the genre of Romance - understood broadly - in the multilingual literary landscape of the British Isles (and Ireland) during the Middle Ages.
The conference will feature plenary lectures by Suzanne Akbari (Toronto) and Corinne Saunders (Durham).

Madhouse, Medicine, Mercy: Treatment of Insanity in Wilkie Collins' Jezebel's Daughter

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 10:53am
Anamta Rizvi

While Victorian era was essentially marked as an age of impeccable scientific discoveries, with eminent scientists as John F. W. Herschel, William Whewell, Charles Babbage, William Buckland, Charles Darwin and others, Cannon is his book Science and Culture argues that in the 1830s and 1840s even the critics of science "took science as the ultimate criterion of truth" (Ruse 118). Being an age of industrial revolution, it was inevitable for people working in factories to escape the dreadful diseases. The rising medical problems led awareness in the Sate of its duty to control these medical issues. This acted as a catalyst of the already stimulated minds to vest their energies in the direction of medicinal science.

[UPDATE] CFP: "Moved by the Spirit, Authorized by God: Black Women Activists and Religion" NEMLA Mar 17-20, 2016, Hartford. CT

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 9:34am
Jami Carlacio, Borough of Manhattan CC/CUNY

Since the era of slavery and continuing through the present, Black women have articulated a vision of freedom, equality, anti-racism, and racial uplift, drawing from Scripture to sustain their work of promoting equal rights for African Americans. From the early female abolitionists such as Maria Stewart, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman, to the anti-lynching activists Ida B. Wells and Mary Talbert, to the twentieth-century civil rights activists Ella Josephine Baker and Septima Clark, and countless others, these "churchwomen" actively challenged the status quo that relegated Black women to the least empowered positions in the social order.

Adolescence in Film and Television (March 21-25, 2016; Proposals due October 1, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 11:10pm
Popular Culture/American Culture Association

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture/American Culture Association Conference, to be held March 21-25, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.

Submissions that explore noteworthy coverage patterns, representations, and themes pertaining to the portrayal of adolescence/adolescents in film and television, during any historical era, are desired from scholars, educators, and students at all levels.

[UPDATE] Roundtable: "Crushed Silos: The Video Essay, Film, Writing, and Technology." NeMLA Hartford, CT

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 9:09pm
Rebecca Romanow/University of Rhode Island

Call for Papers

46th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 17-20, 2016
Hartford, CT

Roundtable: "Crushed Silos: The Video Essay, Film, Writing, and Technology."

The video essay represents an active place where the barriers between disciplines is merged and converging, and where pedagogical practices, as well as analytical examination, can take place across academic borders.

Modern Myth and Legend - Louisville Conference (Feb. 18-20, 2016)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 4:58pm
International Lawrence Durrell Society

The Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900


http://www.thelouisvilleconference.com

Louisville, KY | 18-20 February 2016

"we do create the world around us since we get it to reflect back our inner symbolism at us. Every man carries a little myth-making machine inside him which operates often without him knowing it. Thus you might say that we live by a very exacting kind of poetic logic--since we get exactly what we ask for, no more and no less."
--The Dark Labyrinth (1947)

Update: Gender and Class Representation in U.S. Culture, NeMLA, Hartford, 3/17-3/20

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 3:57pm
47th Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

This panel investigates the contemporary meaning of gender and class in film and literature in the United States. While authors such as Sheryl Sandberg and Hannah Rosin focus on women in the professional ranks to argue for women's prominence in U.S. culture and stories of professional women dominate the media, few stories of working-class women have emerged to challenge the symbolic dominance of the white male worker and breadwinner. As work, families, and genders have changed, how has this symbolism been reinforced or challenged in literature and film?

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

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