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[UPDATE] Expanded Horizons: New Approaches to CinemaScope Aesthetics (SCMS 2016 Atlanta, Submit by 8/15

updated: 
Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 11:53am
Anthony Coman, University of Florida; Sam Roggen, University of Antwerp


We invite your papers exploring the production history, aesthetics, and legacy of CinemaScope films. The anamorphic technology, seized upon by Twentieth Century-Fox in an effort to revitalize studio finances, presented technical and formal challenges to Hollywood's established methods of filmmaking and spurred the creativity of many filmmakers. The early CinemaScope years therefore offer a prime case for studying how a phase of technological change might have influenced the work of classical studio directors.

[REMINDER] "Shakespeare and Dance" essay cluster.

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 8:41pm
Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

Borrowers & Lenders, The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation, is soliciting contributions to its "Appropriations in Performance" section. B&L is a peer-reviewed, online, multimedia scholarly journal and winner of the CELJ's "Best New Journal" award for 2007. We publish two issues each year. In addition to the main section, which features articles and article clusters, we regularly run three dedicated sections: Appropriations in Performance, Digital Appropriations, and Book Reviews.

For the "Appropriations in Performance" section, we prefer thesis-driven reviews focused on arguments and observations over more traditional, archival reviews geared primarily to making descriptive or evaluative records.

UPDATE: HPFI SALT and SUGAR/SALT or SUGAR? OCT 29-30 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 7:54pm
Henri Peyre French Institute The Graduate Center of CUNY

The Henri Peyre French Institute Food Seminar:
SALT and SUGAR/SALT or SUGAR?
OCTOBER 29-30 2015, THE GRADUATE CENTER of CUNY
SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED TO AUGUST 31 2015

[UPDATE] "It's Happening Again": Twenty-Five Years of Twin Peaks: EXTENDED DEADLINE! (new submission date: September 30 2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 5:15pm
Eric Hoffman and Dominick Grace

Call for Papers for "It's Happening Again": 25 Years of Twin Peaks is a proposed edited collection on the television show Twin Peaks. Eric Hoffman and Dominick Grace solicit essays for a new collection celebrating one of television's greatest cult phenomena. Originally airing in 1990/91, Mark Frost and David Lynch's Twin Peaks will be returning, just over twenty-five years after it went off the air, and this collection will explore the show in the context of its time, and its legacy. We are interested in papers on all aspects of the television program as well as on tie-ins and connected materials (e.g. the film Fire Walk with Me, the new Log Lady material added for the show's run on Bravo, the book The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, etc.).

Special Issue: Christianity in Contemporary Native America (Sept. 30, 2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 5:04pm
Editors: Kimberly G. Wieser (University of Oklahoma), Rachel R. Luckenbill (Duquesne University)

Contemporary perspectives on Christianity's role in American Indian communities are diverse and often ambiguous, partly due to this religion's involvement in colonization. While some grassroots traditionalists and many in the activist and academic communities frequently reject Christianity for its role in dismantling American Indian traditions and identities, the past is complex, and the American Indian Christian community is strong and growing. The last two decades have seen its resurgence. Recent works such as Mona Susan Power's Sacred Wilderness Sterlin Harjo's This May Be the Last Time, and The Cherokee Hymnbook: New Edition for Everyone reflect ongoing practices of Christianity in Indian Country today.

Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Transmission of Ideas in Colonial America- NEMLA 2016, Hartford, CT- Abstract Deadline 9/30

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 4:06pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Scholarship regarding the creation and transmission of ideas in colonial British America often falls under the methodology of one discipline or another. Literary scholars, historians, philosophers, musicologists, archaeologists, anthropologists, and others research and discuss the same areas of inquiry, but seldom work in close proximity and dialogue with one another. This panel is an opportunity for scholars across the disciplines to share their own ideas about the movement of knowledge and ideologies in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century colonial British America.

[CFP] Powerful and Dangerous: Audre Lorde's Legacy Today - Aug 7 deadline

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 3:12pm
Lana Lin/Society for Cinema and Media Studies

The siting of the 2016 SCMS conference in Atlanta (3/30-4/3/16), where the Audre Lorde papers are housed at Spelman College, provides an ideal opportunity to convene a panel that addresses Lorde's investment in the intersections of race, gender, class, ability, age, and power. This panel seeks scholars, media makers, activists, and educators who have made use of the Audre Lorde archive, both at Spelman and at large, to examine the impact of the Black lesbian feminist poet's ideas on the contemporary moment.

Dancing in Restoration and 18th-Century England--due 9/15/15

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 2:55pm
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Annual Meeting (Mar. 21-April 2)

Dance was an important part of Restoration and eighteenth-century society and of Restoration and eighteenth- century theatre, and it figures prominently in a number of eighteenth-century novels as well. Yet it is a field of study that has been largely overlooked in Restoration and eighteenth-century scholarship that focuses on England. This panel invites papers on all aspects of eighteenth-century British dance culture, from attempts to reconstruct or analyze dances to explorations of eighteenth-century dance textbooks to inquiries into how dance informed the other arts like theater, opera, and the novel. What might the methodologies of dance scholarship contribute to our understanding of eighteenth-century books, performances, or cultures?

Theorizing the Provincial ( NeMLA, 3/17-20/2016, Hartford, CT)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 2:55pm
Andrew Hamilton, College of the Holy Cross

CFP: Theorizing the Provincial (NeMLA 3/17-20.2016, Hartford, CT)
Northeast Modern Language Association Conference, March 17-20, Hartford, CT

Deadline for Abstracts: September 30, 2015

Rosa Luxemburg and the Contemporary: Imperialism, Neoliberalism, Revolution

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 1:24pm
New Formations: A Journal of Culture / Theory / Politics

This issue of New Formations will propose a rethinking of the legacy of revolutionary socialist Rosa Luxemburg in the twenty-first century. In particular, essays included in the issue will draw on Luxemburg's writings in order to address pressing issues of the contemporary world. At a time when neoliberal policies strengthen the smooth running of imperialist dispossession and continue to break the oppressed classes through new forms of precariat, debt, marginalisation, militarism and impoverishment, Luxemburg's inheritance seems to acquire an unexpected poignancy. Luxemburg's uncompromising commitment to socialism as only alternative to the violence of capitalism can inspire engaged movements fighting social justice in many contexts of the globe.

The Great War Revisited: NEMLA 2016: 3/17-3/20; abstracts due 9/30/15

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 10:39am
Dana Shiller

As we move past the centennial of the start of the Great War, how have fictional representations of World War I evolved? The past few years have witnessed a resurgence of interest in the war, from the WWI segments of Downton Abbey to Erik Larson's "narrative nonfiction" treatment of the sinking of the Lusitania, to a film version of Vera Brittain's Testament of Youth. Given British and American engagement in recent wars, how are authors looking afresh at "the war to end all wars"? How does the "new" literature of World War participate in the revisionary impulse that marks much contemporary historical fiction—for example, neo-Victorian novels?

[Update] Call for Panels and Creative Work--Southern Writers Symposium--October 23-24, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 10:34am
Southern Writers Symposium at Methodist University

Our focus is on the South, but for the 2015 Symposium, we are particularly interested in the intersection of art, particularly photography, and creative writing. How does the visual evoke the written word?

We are accepting proposals for readings in fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction as well as panel discussions and workshops.

Writing Workshops: Propose a workshop that gives Symposium attendees practical writing advice that enhances their writing. All genres and geographic locations welcome.

Presentation/Panel Discussion Sessions: Pitch a panel or presentation that explores any aspect of creative writing from the idea to the marketplace.

The Bible and 19th-Century American Women Writers (NeMLA, March 17-20, 2016 Connecticut)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 29, 2015 - 8:48am
Amy Easton-Flake/Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

Direct references and allusions to Christianity or the Bible are an integral part of much 19th-century literature. This panel takes seriously this oft-neglected aspect of women's writing. Papers will likely explore questions such as how did women use Biblical allusions to advance stories or causes, how did they make scriptures relevant to contemporary society, or how did they use literature to comment on and take part in shaping religious doctrines and practices. Please submit abstracts of 200-300 words through the NeMLA site https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/User/SessionManage/15609 by September 30, 2015.

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