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gender studies and sexuality

Critical Fashion & Luxury at NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
nigel lezama, brock university
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Jen Sweeney (Bard College), Nigel Lezama (Brock University) & Jess Clark (Brock University) are co-organizing a small series of critical fashion and luxury studies interventions and events at NeMLA in Washington, DC, from March 21 to 24, 2019. We are seeking 200-word proposals from speakers for the following panel and round table:

Power Dressing: Counter-Hegemonic Practices in Fashion And Luxury

Capitalizing on Fashion and Luxury Studies and Practices: A Roundtable Discussion

For more info, click here: https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/2097159/fashion-inte...

NeMLA 2019 Panel: The Future of Trauma Studies

updated: 
Sunday, September 9, 2018 - 2:31pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This pre-approved panel seeks scholars to present at the 2019 NeMLA conference (March 21-24 in Washington, DC) on the topic of trauma studies.

Panel Description:

Within literary trauma theory, no critic is more ubiquitous than Cathy Caruth whose seminal works—Unclaimed Experience (1996) and Trauma: Explorations in Memory (1995)—remain hegemonic more than two decades since their publication. Drawing on the work of psychiatrists Judith Herman and Bessel van der Kolk, Caruth imagines trauma as an “impossible history” and claims that to listen to trauma is to listen to narrative “departure.” Trauma figures into Caruth’s work as silence—a force strong enough to cause language to fail.

From Ms. Pac-Man to GLaDOS: Gender and Diversity in Video Games

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:58pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Seminar at the 2019 NeMLA Convention

Washington, DC, March 21 - 24, 2019

Organizer: Kristopher Poulin-Thibault (University of Toronto)

New Representations of Motherhood in the Literature of the New Millennium

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:26pm
Laura Lazzari, Catholic University of America - NeMLA Annual Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Please consider submitting an abstract for the roundtable on New Representations of Motherhood in the Literature of the New MillenniumNeMLA Convention, Washington, DC, March 21-24, 2019.

 

Compared to a few decades ago, the birth rate in many Western countries has dramatically decreased and the roles and representations of maternal figures have changed significantly. Through IVF, gamete donation and surrogacy, motherhood is no longer defined univocally, and family structures have evolved accordingly. This panel seeks at investigating how biotechnology, social and family changes, law, and religion inform the representations of motherhood in the literature of the new millennium from an interdisciplinary perspective. 

Adolescence in Film and Television (April 17-20, 2019; Proposals due October 1, 2018)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:46pm
Kylo-Patrick R. Hart, Area Chair, Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture Association Conference, to be held April 17-20, 2019 in Washington, D.C. The official deadline for online submission of presentation abstracts (see below for additional information) is October 1, 2018.

Submissions that explore noteworthy coverage patterns, representations, and themes pertaining to the portrayal of adolescence/adolescents in film and television, during any historical era, are desired from scholars, educators, and students at all levels. 

Quaring Childhood

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:41pm
south: a scholarly journal
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

CFP: Quaring Childhood

 

south: a scholarly journal invites submissions for “Quaring Childhood,” a special issue guest edited by Katherine Henninger, to be published in Spring 2019. This issue brings several fields that have developed substantially in the past two decades—childhood studies, critical race studies, queer theory, and new southern studies—into dialogue.

 

Crafting, Crafters, and Craft Culture Area

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:09pm
Southwest Popular and American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 1, 2018

Call for Papers

Crafting, Crafters, and Craft Culture Area

Area Chair: Janet Brennan Croft

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

 

40th Annual Conference, February 20-23, 2019

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: November 1, 2018

 

Making History in Our Time: Gender and Contingency in the Professional Work Force (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:42pm
Margie Burns/Northeast MLA (NeMLA) Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This session focuses on gender and contingency in the university work force and in the digital economy. Emphasis is on contingency in relation to women employed as adjuncts or other contingent faculty in universities, such as contract workers in the digital economy. This panel invites papers on approaches to deal with contingency and gender, including formal or structural models, reforms, and collective bargaining. The panel invites papers on efforts including localized or workplace-specific approaches and on related plans.

 

 

Complications of Eating: Investigating (In)digestion in Literature and Film

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:03pm
Niki Kiviat
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

As recent literary and cultural critics have shown, food, and its presence in literature and film, is not solely linked to corporeal survival. The relationship between food and the body is also one of chemical and physical processes, and of tolerance and rejection (both individual and societal). Food—eating, preparation, choice—therefore also embodies social and cultural nuances and, in their evolution, processes of change. What is more, in the acts of consumption and digestion, food can re-emerge in various, and often socially taboo, ways and, in so doing, highlight sociocultural boundaries and normativities. In other words, food not only reflects on individual biological needs, but it also exposes larger social ontologies.

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