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gender studies and sexuality

CFP: Women & Science in the Long 18th Century (9/1/06; ASECS, 3/22/07-3/25/07)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2006 - 9:44pm
JUDY A. HAYDEN

Call for Papers: =93Works of Fancy: Women, Literature, and Science=94 =

ASECS =96 March 22-25, Atlanta, Georgia

This panel explores women and scientific discourse in the long =
eighteenth century. Genres include, but are not limited to, poetry, =
prose (fiction and non-fiction), drama, and art. This session focuses =
particularly on women utilizing scientific discovery, discourse, and/or =
representation in the context of their work rather than women =
specifically writing about science, although this would be of interest =
as well.

Please forward a 300-500 word abstract and vita by September 1, 2006 to =
jhayden_at_ut.edu or by regular mail to arrive by September 1,2006 to:

CFP: Women and the Everyday Realities of War (11/1/07; collection)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2006 - 9:44pm
Emily Smith

Women and the everyday realities of war

Call for contributions

Essay collection

Whether living through the British Civil War in the seventeenth century or the American Civil War in the nineteenth century or today's conflicts in the Middle East, women writers have historically chronicled their responses to war in ways that merge politics and domesticity. Despite vast differences in time and place, works like Jane Cavendish's manuscript writing (ca. 1640) shares with Hanan al-Shaykh's more recent evocations of war-torn Beirut a sense that women's acts of everyday resistance--making bread even when food supplies have been raided, for example--impact the way war works, on metaphoric, physical, political, and ideological levels.

UPDATE: Crossing Borders: Women and Communities of Letters, 1500-1700 (12/31/06; collection)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2006 - 9:42pm
Julie Campbell

UPDATE: CALL FOR PAPERS

We have extended the deadline for papers for the volume Crossing Borders:
Women and Communities of Letters, 1500-1700 to April 15, 2007. We would
like to receive proposals by December 31, 2006.

Crossing Borders: Women and Communities of Letters, 1500-1700

We welcome submissions for a volume of essays that addresses issues
discussed in the two-part panel sessions called Crossing Borders: Learned
Women and Communities of Letters presented at the Sixteenth-Century Studies
Conference in 2005.

CFP: From Dragonflight to Lost: Women and Science Fiction & Fantasy (8/18/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 18, 2006 - 9:41pm
Women's Studies

CFP: From Dragonflight to Lost: Women and Science Fiction & Fantasy =
(8/18/06; journal issue)
Women's Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal welcomes the submission =
of essays for an upcoming special issue focused on the topic of Women =
and Science Fiction & Fantasy. From pioneering female SF/Fantasy authors =
such as Anne McCaffrey and Ursula K. Le Guin to female characters on hit =
television shows such as Lost and Battlestar Galactica, women and =
women's roles are intricately tied to Science Fiction and Fantasy.
This issue will explore some of the intersections between Women and =
Science Fiction and Fantasy. Topics could include but are not limited =
to:

UPDATE: Diversity and Change in Early Canadian Women's Writing (9/15/06; collection)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 12, 2006 - 8:31pm
Jen Chambers

*** Please note the updated deadline for papers***

CALL FOR PAPERS

"Diversity and Change in Early Canadian Women's
Writing" (collection)
UPDATED DEADLINE: September 15, 2006

This spring's Congress conference call for papers on
"Diversity and Change: Early Canadian Women Writers"
yielded the attention of Cambridge Scholars Press
(http://www.cambridgescholarspress.com), who is
interested in publishing an edited collection of
essays on the subject. This is a call for complete,
developed, critical essays on diversity and change in
early Canadian women's writing for this collection of
essays.

CFP: Multiculturalism in Girl Sleuth Fiction (9/1/06; Nancy Drew, 2/16/07-2/17/07)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 12, 2006 - 8:31pm
mcor7215

A panel or panels on multiculturalism and representations of race and ethnic
identity is being constructed for the Wilson College conference on Nancy Drew
and Girl Sleuths. The goal of the panel is to examine representations of race
and ethnic identity in girl sleuth literature, both past and present; since
most characters in girl sleuth stories are generally white, this panel is
concerned about how other races and ethnic identities are depicted and
represented in contrast to the whiteness that seems to inform the majority of
the characters in these texts.

To submit an abstract, send it to the address listed for the conference below.

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