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gender studies and sexuality

CFP: Evil Queens in Lit, TV, and Film (5/26/06; PCAS/ACAS, 10/5/06-10/7/06)

updated: 
Friday, April 21, 2006 - 3:07pm
Kenny Rutherford

"Monster Queens" in Literature, Television, and Film
   
   "Monster Queens" may be any female rulers associated with monsters or monstrosity. Whether they be literal monsters, non-human, or humans with monstrous inner natures, thus metaphorical ones (examples of "monster queens" might include Akasha, Queen of the Vampires, in Anne Rice's Queen of the Damned or Bavmorda, in George Lucas's Willow ), monstrous or "monster queens" figure significantly in our literature and popular culture. Topics related to these characters might include the following issues or areas: androgyny, femininity, gender and power, female appropriation of male roles, and ruler-subject relations.
   
  Session, Chair Kenneth Rutherford

UPDATE: Victorians Institute - Gender and Reform (6/1/06; 10/20/06)

updated: 
Friday, April 21, 2006 - 3:07pm
Rose, Anita R.

Call for Papers - Update
The Victorians Institute
October 20, 21, 2006
Converse College
Spartanburg, SC

>From Mrs. Jellyby to Edwin Chadwick:
 Gender and Reform in Victorian Culture

Keynote speaker: Alison Booth, University of Virginia
Author: "How to Make it as a Woman"

Possible topics may include:

CFP: Representations of Murdered & Missing Women (10/30/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Friday, April 21, 2006 - 3:07pm
Amber Dean

Special Issue of West Coast Line:
Representations of Murdered and Missing Women.

This special issue of West Coast Line, to be published in 2007, will
gather together work related to representations of murdered and missing
women. While the focus of the issue is on representations of murdered
and missing women of Vancouver and British Columbia, WCL also invites
works which have a national or international context. (If you have
questions, please query the guest editors for a response specific to
what you propose). For more details, see below.

UPDATE: Anthology on Brokeback Mountain (6/30/06; collection)

updated: 
Friday, April 21, 2006 - 3:07pm
Olsen-Fazi, Annette M.

Editors are currently seeking scholarly essays (as opposed to personal narratives) that address the movie Brokeback Mountain, and/or Annie Proulx's short story of the same title. The deadline for submissions has been extended until June 30, 2006.
Submit full essays electronically (no abstracts, please) to:
Dr. Annette Olsen-Fazi
Associate Professor of English and French
216 F Pellegrino Hall
Texas A & M International University
5201 University Bld
Laredo, TX 78041-1900
Telephone: (956) 326-2657
Email: aolsen-fazi_at_tamiu.edu
Sender: owner-cfp_at_lists.sas.upenn.edu
Precedence: bulk

CFP: Early Modern Women Writers Across Borders (5/12/06; RSA, 3/22/07-3/24/07)

updated: 
Friday, April 21, 2006 - 3:06pm
Martine van Elk

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Early Modern Women Writers Across Borders

A session at the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America,
22-24 March 2007 in Miami, Florida

Early modern women writers are frequently examined in terms that are
limited to their own countries. And yet, we might fruitfully compare
women writers in different countries and look at how women writers
themselves transcended national boundaries, by participating in
international debates, translating texts, situating themselves in
relation to writers from abroad, and in numerous other ways.

CFP: Caribbean Anti-Hero(in)es (5/10/06; ICCS, 11/2/06-11/5/06)

updated: 
Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 1:05pm
jmwilks_at_mail.utexas.edu

I am seeking contributions for a panel to be held at the International
Conference on Caribbean Studies at the Holiday Inn SunSpree Resort, South Padre
Island, Texas; November 2-5, 2006. From Maryse Condé's and Paule Marshall's
jaded intellectuals to Hilma Contreras' Parisian exiles, Caribbean writing is
rich with women characters who are complex, brilliant, and independent, but not
necessarily exemplary. What is the role of the anti-hero(ine) in Caribbean
literature? How do such figures, as Condé might suggest, inject disorder into
established and emerging literary hegemonies? The purpose of this panel is
two-fold: (1) to interrogate the work of Caribbean writers, particularly women,

CFP: Gender and Crime in 18c Popular Culture (4/15/06; NEASECS, 11/9/06-11/12/06)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 2:25pm
Jennifer Thorn

Papers sought for a panel at the annual meeting of the Northeast
American Society for 18c Studies in Salem, MA, Nov 9-12, 2006 that
will examine the ways gender figured in popular representations of
the causes, effects, and progress of criminality through the
18c. Especially desirable are papers that revisit the work of
Frances Dolan, Garthine Walker, or Margaret Arnot, and/or that engage
with Robert Shoemaker's argument, at the October 2005 conference on
Gender and Popular Culture at University of Michigan, for the
significance of London's "female crime wave" of 1690-1730. Proposals
and cv by April 15 to Jennifer Thorn, Colby College. Email:

CFP: Atlantic Literary Review: Rites of Passage in Post-Colonial Women's Writing (4/29/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 2:24pm
Michelle Bernard

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Atlantic Literary Review

Proposals are invited for a special issue of Atlantic Literary Review on
rites of passage in post-colonial women's writing, including births, coming
of age, marriages, death and mourning.

This is to be jointly edited by Gina Wisker and Pauline Dodgson-Katiyo.

Please send in abstracts of 300 words by April 29, 2006 to:

Michelle Bernard

UCLT

204 Eastings

Anglia Ruskin University

East Road

Cambridge

Cambs, CB1 1PT

UK

Tel: (01223) 363271 ext. 2411

E-mail: m.bernard_at_anglia.ac.uk

UPDATE: MP Feminist Journal Popular Culture Issue (5/1/06; journal issue)

updated: 
Friday, April 7, 2006 - 2:38pm
Lynda L. Hinkle

MP International Feminist Journal invites you to contribute to a special
themed issue on "Popular Culture". The machinations of culture take many
forms, and while the Academy has not opened up its arms to completely accept
popular culture, it is beginning to see that the study of popular culture
contributes toward an interdisciplinary understanding of our world, our
social interactions and our future as an international community. Papers on
any aspect of popular culture as they apply to feminism and feminist
discourse are welcomed: television, popular literature, music, film,
"reality" television, street culture, fashion, pop psychology (self help)

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