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gender studies and sexuality

CFP: Domestic Frontiers: Domestic Colonization (12/31/05; journal issue)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2005 - 2:02pm
Gayle Gullett

Gayle Gullett
Co-editor
FRONTIERS: A JOURNAL OF WOMEN STUDIES
Associate Professor
History Department
Arizona State University
PO Box 872501
Tempe, AZ 85287-4302
(480) 965-4787
fax (480) 965-0310

CFP: Domestic Frontiers: Domestic Colonization (12/31/05; journal issue)

A Special Issue of Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies

Guest editors

Victoria K Haskins (Flinders University of South Australia)
Victoria.Haskins_at_flinders.edu.au
Margaret Jacobs (University of Nebraska)
mjacobs3_at_unlnotes.unl.edu

Call for papers

CFP: Media and Sexual Minorities (11/1/05; 4/21/06-4/22/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2005 - 2:01pm
Kylo Hart

We invite panel and individual-paper proposals for Media and Sexual Minorities:
A GLBT Media Studies Conference, to be held at Plymouth State University
(Plymouth, New Hampshire) April 21-22, 2006.

CFP: Sex, Secularism & Enlightenment (9/15/05; ASECS, 3/30/06-4/2/06)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2005 - 4:21pm
Lori Branch

American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
37th Annual Meeting
Montreal, Quebec, March 30-April 2, 2006

Session Title: "Sex, Secularism and Enlightenment"

In <Formations of the Secular>, Talal Asad has described secularism as a
political ideology that took shape in the nineteenth century, based on the
concept of "the secular" that coalesced in early modernity and the
eighteenth century. What role did sex and gender play in this
conceptualization of the secular, in religious and non-religious texts and
identities? What are the sexualized components of a secular identity or
subjectivity? How do they impact the transformation of religious
identities in the period?

CFP: Popular Nineteenth-Century Women Writers in the Literary Marketplace (11/30/05; collection)

updated: 
Sunday, July 24, 2005 - 8:35pm
Earl Yarington

Cambridge Scholars Press has contacted me and would like me to submit a book proposal on my proposed Society for the Study of American Women Writers panel titled "Popular Nineteenth-Century Women Writers and the Literary Marketplace." Though I can only accept four papers for the conference, I need about twelve to fifteen papers for the book. I would like to get the book proposal out before the end of this year; therefore, please note the deadline listed below. The focus of the book will be on the American marketplace and how women writers dealt with their editors ("gentlemen publishers"). In other words, how did the woman writer's relationship with the publisher influence or change her work?

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