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general announcements

Afterlives: Reinvention, Reception, and Reproduction

updated: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 9:53am
Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at CSU Long Beach and Forest Lawn Museum
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2019

REMINDER: Deadline Approaching July 15, 2019

Afterlives: Reinvention, Reception, and Reproduction

November 9, 2019

Forest Lawn Museum, 1712 S. Glendale Ave, Glendale, CA 91205

Call for Papers

9th International Conference Buddhism & Australia

updated: 
Monday, June 17, 2019 - 12:09pm
Buddhism & Australia
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 20, 2019

Rhe IC Buddhism & Australia invites submissions for the 9th international conference Buddhism & Australia that will be held on 6-8 February 2020 in Perth, Western Australia. The conference investigates the history, current and future directions of Buddhism and is a platform for scientists and Buddhists to present their latest researches on Buddhism. Researchers across a broad range of disciplines are welcomed as well the submission of pre-formed panel proposals.

Topics for submission include but are not limited to:

Ages and Stages: Women in the Academy, Revisted

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:40pm
Terry Novak/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Although much has changed in the academy in recent decades, many struggles related to gender and the “traditional notions” of the roles women fulfill and the roles men fulfill in the academy have remained strikingly rigid, to the detriment of individuals as well as to the collective institution. Women still bear a service burden disproportionate to that of their male colleagues. Women in the academy still struggle with childbearing and child rearing choices that men in the academy do not face in the same way. Women still face sexism and sexual harassment that their male counterparts escape. For women of color, the burdens are magnified.

Samuel Beckett and the Comedy of Unhappiness

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:35pm
Pacific Ancient & Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

117th Annual Conference - San Diego, California
Thursday, November 14 - Sunday, November 17, 2019

This session will focus on Samuel Beckett, the preeminent advocate for the clown. In Beckett’s novels, the protagonists and the narrator are often clowns. Waiting For Godot was written for actors who donned the attire of tramp-clowns. Beckett’s inspiration often sprang from silent film— he emulated Charles Chaplin and Buster Keaton.

New Book Series: Precarity and Contingency

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:36pm
CSU Open Press and the Center for the Study of Academic Labor
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

From Sue Doe and Seth Kahn, co-editors:

 

We are excited to offer our first call for proposals for a new book series called Precarity and Contingency, published by the Colorado State University Open Press and sponsored by the CSU Center for the Study of Academic Labor.

 

Deadline: August 30, 2019

Decisions: Early October 2019

 

What we want to publish

Teaching and Engaging Shakespeare in the Classroom (NeMLA 2020, roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:01pm
John F. Maune / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

More than 400 years after his death Shakespeare is still taught in western universities and throughout the world. The number of published books related to his works as well as similarly devoted scholarly conferences seem to increase yearly. This means that what and how to approach teaching Shakespeare is not stagnant as might be imagined, but rather is expanding. The number of plays attributed to Shakespeare have seen some fluctuations, but the theory and scholarly research applied to pinch and prod his works continue to produce new stimulating insights. This gives the teacher more options on what to include in their lessons and by necessity, what to exclude. It is no easy choice deciding what to focus on in the classroom.

Women Writing Fashion

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 1:41pm
NeMLA/ hosted by Dr. Jen Sweeney and Jaclyn Marcus
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel is focused on the employment of fashion by female-identifying authors to discuss issues of inequity, specifically surrounding the themes of gender, sexuality, race, and class in their writing. In this panel, the relationship between text and the sartorial and the capitalization on this relationship by female-identifying authors will be explored. Given the focus of this panel on centering voices across cultures, we especially welcome papers discussing global texts, authors writing in all languages, and analyzing works written from non-Western perspectives.

NeMLA Convention 2020: Formalism and Fun: On Experiencing Text and Time in the Classroom

updated: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - 12:19pm
Shun Y. Kiang / University of Central Oklahoma
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Time is of the essence, and academia has responded accordingly. From measuring objectives and outcomes, to the shortening of course sequences, and from the promotion of multimodal learning and multitasking, to the emphasis on testing over slower, but pleasurable, processes of meaning-making, teaching and learning in the classroom has become rushed and fraught, especially in areas such as composition and the study of literature, where teachers and students struggle to keep up, delivering and demonstrating knowledge efficiently n homogenous, empty time. Keep up or fail: a false dilemma now normalized, forcing itself upon us. In The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy (2016), however, Maggie Berg and Barbara K.

Biopolitics of Nature: Artistic Representations of Environment in Latin America

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:20pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Space in what we today call Latin America has been increasingly contested since 1492. As a result, many critics have argued that Latin American spaces are constantly subject to rearticulations. Latin American artists have produced poems, novels, short stories, songs, still art, theatre, movies, and other cultural manifestations as vehicles of rearticulation, especially in relation to natural and built environments. Indeed, an especially rich vein of contemporary Latin American cultural production embeds an active ecological awareness. A considerable part of recent ecocriticism addresses how the symbolic potential of art conveys the urgency of environmental concerns.

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