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Victorians Institute Conference 2019: The Nineteenth-Century Gothic

updated: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 10:19am
Indu Ohri / Victorians Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 28, 2019

Seeking paper abstracts for the panel “The Nineteenth-Century Gothic” at the Victorians Institute Conference in Charleston, SC, October 31-November 2, 2019.

The organizer invites submissions that explore the literary features, historical contexts, theoretical approaches, and adaptations/neo-Victorian incarnations of nineteenth-century ghost stories or Gothic topics. Papers related to the Gothic in the conference’s thematic territories of Charleston, Britain, Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean are especially welcome. Please email your CVs and 250-300-word abstracts to Indu Ohri at io3jc@virginia.edu by Friday, June 28, 2019.

Writing the Other: The Challenges of Creative Writing and Inclusion

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 11:30am
Dr. Abby Bardi/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

While for many years, the literary canon was the province of “dead white men,” the past fifty years have dramatically altered that paradigm. Contemporary creative writers, too, would like their work to reflect the diversity and complexity of human experience in terms of race, gender, sexual identification, ethnicity, nationality, and culture. This panel invites creative writers of all genres, genders, races, sexual orientations, nationalities, cultures, etc., to consider the challenges of being more inclusive in their work. Some questions that will be considered: Is it possible to write from the perspectives of races, genders, etc., of whom one is not a representative?

Vampires, Zombies, Bodices, and Perps: Genre in Creative Writing

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Genre fiction (such as fantasy, sci-fi, suspense and mystery, thrillers, historical romance) has often been discouraged in creative-writing courses, even outlawed. However, in recent years, the popularity of genre fiction in the marketplace has challenged the boundaries of literary writing. This panel will consider some of the following questions: How do challenges to the traditional boundaries of genre impact the teaching of creative writing? How might fiction, drama, and even poetry address these challenges? How can the conventions and tropes of genre fiction be used fruitfully in literary writing? Both writers who work in or with particular genres and writers who have resisted the lure of genre are encouraged to share their work and ideas.

Creative Writing and the New Higher Ed

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the development of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop at the University of Iowa in the 1930s, creative writing courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level have proliferated. In 2008, there were 156 MFA programs in Creative Writing in the U.S; in 2016 there were 244. This roundtable will consider the status of international creative writing courses and programs within the context of the evolving picture of higher education. Some questions to consider: What effects might the spread of online education have on creative-writing pedagogy? Is creative writing as a field sustainable? As higher education moves to encompass a variety of formats and economic models, how will creative writing courses have to evolve?

The Book Biz: The Novel and Contemporary Publishing

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the rise of the novel during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the literary marketplace has famously been a powerful influence on the form, format, and concerns of both short and longer fiction. This panel will consider the realities of contemporary publishing as a business and the way its corporate structure, economic practices, and publishing procedures impact the lives and work of writers. Some questions to consider: what effects does the advent of electronic publishing have on both the content and the distribution of literary work? How have expanded opportunities for self-publishing impacted the novel’s form and content? What is the contemporary publishing process like, and what are some effective strategies for navigating it?

Creative Writing: Oral Performance in the Classroom

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Print forms of poetry have traditionally been integral to writing and literature classes. However, for many students, especially those in first- or even second-year classes, the written word and the visual layout of poetic form can be foreign, even intimidating. This session will consider the possibilities offered by oral forms such as storytelling and spoken-word poetry. In addition to considering the pedagogical possibilities of oral performance, this session invites poets and storytellers to share their own original work.

Rhetorical Theory Panel for PAMLA, San Diego

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:24am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

This panel welcomes papers that chart recent movements in rhetorical theory—in particular, papers on developments in rhetoric’s connection to materiality, inclusive of broad movements in “new materialism,” “agential realism,” “vitalism,” “object-oriented ontology,” and “object-oriented rhetoric,” and others. Possible questions to be considered: is “agency” uniquely human? Does agency extend into the non- or transhuman domain? To what extent do objects, materials, and environments rhetorically impact human decisions?

Russian & American Short Stories & Influence, updated; Abstract: 7/8/2019; Completed Draft: 12/1/2019

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 9:54am
Jeff Birkenstein
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 8, 2019

CFP: Russian & American Short Stories & Influence, updated

Abstract: 7/8/2019; Completed Draft: 12/1/2019


UPDATE: Below follows our original CFP, which we now update slightly and with urgency. We have thus far assembled an excellent collection of promised essays, but are now looking specifically for essays that meet the requirements below as well as1) are about Russian authors OTHER than Chekhov (as you can imagine, we quickly got our share of those) and 2) about American authors who are of color and/or women. Please read on and submit your idea(s) to us. We are excited to hear from you.

 

NeMLA 2020: Romantic Identities

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:33am
L. Adam Mekler/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

NeMLA 51st Annual Convention
March 5-8, 2020
Boston, Massachusetts
Marriott Copley Place

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