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general announcements

Infernal Cities

updated: 
Thursday, March 26, 2020 - 1:01pm
Stanley Szczesny
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 1, 2020

This is a session for PAMLA 2020 in Las Vegas.

Effects of Pandemics on Religion (Call for Submissions)

updated: 
Thursday, March 26, 2020 - 12:57pm
Global Center for Religious Research
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Global Center for Religious Research

Division of Religious History

Call for Submissions!

The Effects of Pandemics on Religious History

 

The Division of Religious History for the Global Center for Religious Research (GCRR) is seeking written submissions to be anthologized in a bound publication dedicated to the influence and effects of pandemics on religion.

Chapter Proposals for "Coronavirus, Climate Crisis, and Eco-anxiety: Psychology of Pandemics, Global Heating, and Planetary Hope"

updated: 
Wednesday, April 8, 2020 - 1:46am
Douglas Vakoch, PhD / California Institute of Integral Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 10, 2020

Chapter proposals are invited for an edited book called Coronavirus, Climate Crisis, and Eco-anxiety: Psychology of Pandemics, Global Heating, and Planetary Hope. Chapter proposals should explore the psychological dimensions of the threats to human health and survival posed by pandemics such as the coronavirus, as well as by the accelerating global climate emergency. To cover the global scope of these threats, we seek contributions from around the world. Confirmed contributions include:

Edited Volume: Posthuman Pathogenesis

updated: 
Monday, March 23, 2020 - 10:09am
Posthuman Pathogenesis: Virus, Disease, and Epidemiology in Literature, Film, and Media
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 18, 2020

Since the Age of Enlightenment, which glorified reason and empirical observation as the nexus for human knowledge, and the Industrial Revolution, which brought about robust technological changes, science and scientific thinking have been increasingly placed above everything else. But from a humanities perspective, fiction has always moved one step ahead of science, dreaming of the impossible first. Science-fiction and speculative fiction, in both utopian and dystopian forms, are concrete examples of this. From Mary Shelley to Jules Verne, George Orwell, Frank Herbert, Isaac Asimov, Ursula K. Le Guin, and Margaret Atwood, many authors explored what the future holds for the world in their narratives of the ‘back-then’ unimaginable.

Atwood Panel, MLA, January 2020, Toronto

updated: 
Monday, March 23, 2020 - 10:08am
Margaret Atwood Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2020


"Examining the Longest International Border: The US and Canada in Atwood's Works" For the Toronto MLA, The Margaret Atwood Society's panel will explore the representation of Canada and the US in Atwood's works. Papers may investigate depictions of the nations themselves, the relationship between the two nations' peoples, or instances of navigating/crossing the long border. Papers considering how Atwood is taught, e.g. her inclusion in American Lit syllabi, will also be considered.

“The Cultures and Subcultures created and inspired by Margaret Atwood” MMLA, Milwaukee, WI, November 5 – 8

updated: 
Wednesday, April 22, 2020 - 2:22pm
Margaret Atwood Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, May 31, 2020

Organizer: Denise Du Vernay, Loyola University Chicago

In all of Atwood’s works of fiction, cultures are created (usually with their own vernacular) whether they are the post-apocalyptic survivors of the Maddaddam trilogy, the mean girls of Cat’s Eye, the academics of The Edible Woman and Life Before Man, or Mayday in The Handmaid’s Tale and The Testaments, Atwood’s works are rife with cultures of collectivity.

The Sky in Legend and Tradition

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 9:39am
The Folklore Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2020

This two-day conference on the Sky in Legend and Tradition will be held on Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th September 2020 as the fifteenth Legendary Weekend of the Folklore Society, at the Medieval Hall in the Cathedral Close in Salisbury, SP1 2EY. We’d welcome speakers on the lore of clouds and storms, dragons and angels, levitation and ufology, ornithomancy, astrology and the flying ships of Magonia. Anyone who can contribute – mythologists, meteorologists, singers, sky pilots, academics and Ascended Masters. Presentations, which should be 20 minutes long, can take the form of talks, performances, or art installations. For more information, see https://folklore-society.com/.

The Transformative Experience of the Journey via Recollection and Reflection

updated: 
Friday, March 13, 2020 - 4:09pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 1, 2020

The travel memoir offers an opportunity to examine a number of issues in terms of creative non-fiction. Travel stories focus on individuals who become strangers to themselves when they exile themselves from the environmental and cultural factors that have defined them thus far in service of self-discovery. They link up with the grand Odysseus-like impulse of traditional and modern literature that can profoundly alter identity when they travel and write about their experiences. Topics to consider would include a discussion of three particular aspects of this kind of storytelling. First, we must discuss the idea of fiction vs. fact and try to decide how much of each is essential in terms of crafting biographical material.

Call for Papers 2020

updated: 
Friday, March 13, 2020 - 3:58pm
The Southeastern Renaissance Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 7, 2020

Call for Papers 2020 

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