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Samuel Beckett and the Comedy of Unhappiness

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:35pm
Pacific Ancient & Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

117th Annual Conference - San Diego, California
Thursday, November 14 - Sunday, November 17, 2019

This session will focus on Samuel Beckett, the preeminent advocate for the clown. In Beckett’s novels, the protagonists and the narrator are often clowns. Waiting For Godot was written for actors who donned the attire of tramp-clowns. Beckett’s inspiration often sprang from silent film— he emulated Charles Chaplin and Buster Keaton.

New Book Series: Precarity and Contingency

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:36pm
CSU Open Press and the Center for the Study of Academic Labor
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

From Sue Doe and Seth Kahn, co-editors:

 

We are excited to offer our first call for proposals for a new book series called Precarity and Contingency, published by the Colorado State University Open Press and sponsored by the CSU Center for the Study of Academic Labor.

 

Deadline: August 30, 2019

Decisions: Early October 2019

 

What we want to publish

Teaching and Engaging Shakespeare in the Classroom (NeMLA 2020, roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:01pm
John F. Maune / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

More than 400 years after his death Shakespeare is still taught in western universities and throughout the world. The number of published books related to his works as well as similarly devoted scholarly conferences seem to increase yearly. This means that what and how to approach teaching Shakespeare is not stagnant as might be imagined, but rather is expanding. The number of plays attributed to Shakespeare have seen some fluctuations, but the theory and scholarly research applied to pinch and prod his works continue to produce new stimulating insights. This gives the teacher more options on what to include in their lessons and by necessity, what to exclude. It is no easy choice deciding what to focus on in the classroom.

Women Writing Fashion

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 1:41pm
NeMLA/ hosted by Dr. Jen Sweeney and Jaclyn Marcus
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel is focused on the employment of fashion by female-identifying authors to discuss issues of inequity, specifically surrounding the themes of gender, sexuality, race, and class in their writing. In this panel, the relationship between text and the sartorial and the capitalization on this relationship by female-identifying authors will be explored. Given the focus of this panel on centering voices across cultures, we especially welcome papers discussing global texts, authors writing in all languages, and analyzing works written from non-Western perspectives.

NeMLA Convention 2020: Formalism and Fun: On Experiencing Text and Time in the Classroom

updated: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019 - 6:08pm
Shun Y. Kiang / University of Central Oklahoma
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Time is of the essence, and academia has responded accordingly. From measuring objectives and outcomes, to the shortening of course sequences, and from the promotion of multimodal learning and multitasking, to the emphasis on testing over slower, but pleasurable, processes of meaning-making, teaching and learning in the classroom has become rushed and fraught, especially in areas such as composition and the study of literature, where teachers and students struggle to keep up. Keep up or fail: a false dilemma now normalized, forcing itself upon us. In The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy (2016), however, Maggie Berg and Barbara K.

Biopolitics of Nature: Artistic Representations of Environment in Latin America

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:20pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Space in what we today call Latin America has been increasingly contested since 1492. As a result, many critics have argued that Latin American spaces are constantly subject to rearticulations. Latin American artists have produced poems, novels, short stories, songs, still art, theatre, movies, and other cultural manifestations as vehicles of rearticulation, especially in relation to natural and built environments. Indeed, an especially rich vein of contemporary Latin American cultural production embeds an active ecological awareness. A considerable part of recent ecocriticism addresses how the symbolic potential of art conveys the urgency of environmental concerns.

Dependent Stages: Knowing in Shakespeare (NeMLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:18pm
John F. Maune / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

A playwright has to build their story within their allotted two hours of stage traffic. We are taken on a guided ride from which we glimpse what the playwright chooses, forming our layers of knowledge through which we are manipulated. Often we are privy to the internal thoughts of a character which contrast with their public utterances: e.g., Rosalind/Ganymede, Angelo, or Richard III. Our prescient view makes Macduff's seemingly banal inquiry about his wife and children emotive fire. Our own knowing is challenged just by taking in a play as we know it is not real, yet we embrace the illusion.

After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:14pm
The Telos-Paul Piccone Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The 2020 Annual Telos-Paul Piccone Institute Conference
February 15–16, 2020
Deutsches Haus at New York University
New York, NY

After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid

Keynote Speaker: Catherine Malabou, Kingston University and University of California, Irvine.

 

Conference Description

Pedagogical Approaches to Creating Safer Spaces in the Classroom

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 9:45am
Lindsay Bryde / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

One of the biggest challenges for LGBTQiA students is the fact that there’s a constant question about regarding their need to “come out” and how to determine who is “safe” (a term with many definitions) to do that with on college campuses today. This panel will look at pedagogy approaches to fostering an inclusive environment and what to do when a student needs guidance and services due to their orientation. Participants are encouraged to present pedagogy methods for educating audiences (questioning, out, ally, and general) and fostering safer spaces. Papers can address approaches/lesson plans in the classroom, as well as resources for instructors in their service activities to the campus.  

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