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The Marvel Cinematic Universe: Examining a Post-Endgame World

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 9:46am
Lindsay Bryde / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This roundtable will be looking holistically at perspectives on the first 22 films in the MCU. This arc will be brought to completion with Avenger’s Endgame. Now would be a good time to look back and assess which gambles have worked and/or failed now that a narrative arc has been completed. Participants are encouraged to consider the MCU both as a whole as well as specific franchises under the overall banner.  

The conference is through the Northeast Modern Language Association and will take place March 5-8th, 2020 in Boston, MA

Submissions are due: September 30, 2019

Series Books and Science Fiction (National PCA Conference)

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:05am
National PCA Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

Call for Papers: Series Books and Science Fiction (National PCA Conference)

 

This call for papers for the national PCA Conference looks to interrogate the intersection of two distinct genres: juvenile series books and science fiction.

Constellations: Connections, Disruptions, and Imaginations in Cinema and Beyond (A Conference in Three Clusters)

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:33am
Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Southern California
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

First Forum 2019 Graduate Student Conference
Division of Cinema and Media Studies
University of Southern California 
Thursday, October 10, 2019 and Friday, October 11, 2019
 
Constellations:
Connections, Disruptions, and Imaginations in Cinema and Beyond
(A Conference in Three Clusters)

Identity and Language in Latin American and Caribbean Science Fiction and Speculative Fiction

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:16am
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

Language has always played a key role in the shaping and sharing of identities. Not only does it have the power to create community among people coming from different geographical locations, but most importantly it influences the way we perceive and make sense of the world. For these reasons, the use of language in science fiction —a genre that offers a critical space for "registering tensions related to the defining of national identity and the modernization process" (Ferreira, 2011)— is important as it enables readers to explore alternative realities. This could also be said about speculative fiction. Thus, this panel addresses concerns over reinvented identities through science fiction and across historical periods.

Victorians Institute Conference 2019: The Nineteenth-Century Gothic

updated: 
Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 9:42am
Indu Ohri / Victorians Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 28, 2019

Seeking paper abstracts for the panel “The Nineteenth-Century Gothic” at the Victorians Institute Conference in Charleston, SC, from October 31-November 2, 2019.

The organizer invites submissions that explore the literary features, historical contexts, theoretical approaches, and adaptations/neo-Victorian incarnations of nineteenth-century ghost stories or Gothic topics. Papers related to the Gothic in the conference’s thematic territories of Charleston, Britain, Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean are especially welcome. Please email your CVs and 250-300-word abstracts to Indu Ohri at io3jc@virginia.edu by Friday, June 28, 2019.

Writing the Other: The Challenges of Creative Writing and Inclusion

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 11:30am
Dr. Abby Bardi/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

While for many years, the literary canon was the province of “dead white men,” the past fifty years have dramatically altered that paradigm. Contemporary creative writers, too, would like their work to reflect the diversity and complexity of human experience in terms of race, gender, sexual identification, ethnicity, nationality, and culture. This panel invites creative writers of all genres, genders, races, sexual orientations, nationalities, cultures, etc., to consider the challenges of being more inclusive in their work. Some questions that will be considered: Is it possible to write from the perspectives of races, genders, etc., of whom one is not a representative?

Vampires, Zombies, Bodices, and Perps: Genre in Creative Writing

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Genre fiction (such as fantasy, sci-fi, suspense and mystery, thrillers, historical romance) has often been discouraged in creative-writing courses, even outlawed. However, in recent years, the popularity of genre fiction in the marketplace has challenged the boundaries of literary writing. This panel will consider some of the following questions: How do challenges to the traditional boundaries of genre impact the teaching of creative writing? How might fiction, drama, and even poetry address these challenges? How can the conventions and tropes of genre fiction be used fruitfully in literary writing? Both writers who work in or with particular genres and writers who have resisted the lure of genre are encouraged to share their work and ideas.

Creative Writing and the New Higher Ed

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the development of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop at the University of Iowa in the 1930s, creative writing courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level have proliferated. In 2008, there were 156 MFA programs in Creative Writing in the U.S; in 2016 there were 244. This roundtable will consider the status of international creative writing courses and programs within the context of the evolving picture of higher education. Some questions to consider: What effects might the spread of online education have on creative-writing pedagogy? Is creative writing as a field sustainable? As higher education moves to encompass a variety of formats and economic models, how will creative writing courses have to evolve?

The Book Biz: The Novel and Contemporary Publishing

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Since the rise of the novel during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the literary marketplace has famously been a powerful influence on the form, format, and concerns of both short and longer fiction. This panel will consider the realities of contemporary publishing as a business and the way its corporate structure, economic practices, and publishing procedures impact the lives and work of writers. Some questions to consider: what effects does the advent of electronic publishing have on both the content and the distribution of literary work? How have expanded opportunities for self-publishing impacted the novel’s form and content? What is the contemporary publishing process like, and what are some effective strategies for navigating it?

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