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On Breath

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 3:06pm
University of Toronto
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

CFP for the "On Breath"-Panel at the ACLA Convention 2017, University of Utrecht, June 6-9 2017

 

“Under these conditions, the individual’s breathing is an observed, an occupied breathing. It is a combat breathing.” (Frantz Fanon)

 “Das Gedicht bleibt [...] pneumatisch berührbar.” (Paul Celan)

“The HEART, by way of the BREATH, to the LINE.” (Charles Olson)

“Pas de parole sans air qui la véhicule.” (Luce Irigaray)

“Je suis un respirateur.” (Marcel Duchamp)

 

CFP: Climates of disaster and performance (Special Issue of Akda: The Asian Journal of Literature, Culture, Performance, for release in March 2017)

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:22pm
De La Salle University, Manila
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

CFP: Climates of disaster and performance  (Special Issue of Akda: The Asian Journal of Literature, Culture, Performance, for release in March 2017)

 Taking off from the theme of the Philippine cluster event of PSi#21: Fluid States in 2015, the second issue of Akda: The Asian Journal of Literature, Culture, Performance, which will be its first themed issue on performance, will feature papers from the November 2015 conference ibut is open to new submissions and will be fully double-blind peer reviewed.

Novels of the Holocaust: Fundamental Pedagogical Issues

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

 

The aim of this roundtable is to present possible guidelines and book selections for a hypothetical undergraduate course in “Novels of the Holocaust.” The panel will be resolutely international and open to books originally published in any language. As this roundtable is sponsored by NeMLA’s comparative literature director, participants are not obliged to use or refer to English translations if they wish to use original texts. The course that might be called the “target course” may be for any undergraduate level and for any country.

While this is roundtable is meant to follow the interests of its participants and not impose any institutional rigidities, seven particular themes or questions seem especially important.

Berlin in Film and Fiction: From the Cold War to German Reunification

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Since 1945, Berlin has become a cultural Weltstadt in many ways; this panel would like to focus on three of them. First, the contemporary situation of Berlin in reunified Germany serves as a lens for the flow of people, ideas, rinfluences between Europe and the rest of the world. Second, from 1945-1989, most of the tensions of the Cold War converged in Berlin. Third, for both of these reasons, today a large number of films, novels, and TV programs are set in Berlin, thus making it a privileged place of cultural representation. The purpose of this panel is to study all three of these situations from an international and comparative point of view.

Albert Camus, Our Contemporary?

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

The present literary reputation of Albert Camus is both fascinating and instructive. It is fascinating because, on the one hand, his work is all but absent from global university curricula; yet, he is one of the most widely read authors on the planet. Who has not read The Stranger or The Myth of Sisyphus?

Moreover, Camus and his work are instructive for many reasons.

Revisiting the Great War: From Text to Context

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

World War I marked one of the great turning points in the political, social, and cultural history of Europe and the world.  This panel explores the lived, daily experience of this war by looking at five different forms. Presenters can address these forms in isolation or show the relationships between them. 

First, presenters may analyze and evaluate the experience of the Great War through its literary texts, diaries, or journals. Presenters are encouraged to choose a single passage or two in order to explore the concrete experience of the war. The texts may focus on soldiers, civilians or both. Any text—on the fronts or at home—are suitable for this panel. 

Nietzsche and the Literature of the 19th Century

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

In his lifetime, Nietzsche referred to over 150 nineteenth-century writers in both his published writings and Nachlaß. Nietzsche’s use of nineteenth-century fiction and poetry ranges from somewhat nonchalant to extremely systematic. Indeed, the cornerstone of his “Advent of European Nihilism” in the late 1880s is the decline or decadence of literature during Nietzsche’s lifetime.

The panel attempts to focus on passages, individual novels or poems, and complete bodies of work in order to assess Nietzsche’s use of these texts in his philosophical project.

Heidegger and the Western Literary Tradition

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

 

Heidegger and the Western Literary Tradition.

This panel will investigate the complex relationships between the work of Martin Heidegger and Western literature from the Greeks until the 20th century. Three distinct questions or areas of investigation will be treated: 

• How did Heidegger use a specific writer in one or more of his philosophical writings?  
• How does Heidegger’s use of a given writer relate to our current understanding of the works and themes of this writer?
• Are there thematic points of contact between Heidegger’s work and literary authors that Heidegger may not have mentioned? Can we point out specific limitations that might result from Heidegger’s philosophical methodology?

Teaching the Supernatural: Special Issue of Supernatural Studies

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:20pm
Supernatural Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 31, 2016

Supernatural Studies seeks contributions for a themed issue on teaching (and) the supernatural to be published in Summer 2017 as a special, open-access electronic issue. Supernatural Studies is a peer-reviewed journal that promotes rigorous yet accessible scholarship in the growing field of representations of the supernatural. The breadth of “the supernatural” as a category creates the potential for interplay among otherwise disparate individual studies that will ideally produce not only new work but also increased dialogue and new directions of scholarly inquiry.

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