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JEWISH WOMEN IN MEDIEVAL ENGLAND (ROUNDTABLE) - KALAMAZOO, 12-15 MAY 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 4:34pm
full name / name of organization: 
Adrienne Williams Boyarin (University of Victoria)
contact email: 

It is generally accepted that there are few post-biblical Jewish women in medieval Christian art. When they are depicted, their Jewishness is usually unmarked; where they appear in narrative, they are often passive or eventual converts; they lack the anti-Jewish stereotypes so often associated with Jewish males. Sara Lipton has argued that this is partly because "the Jewess's femaleness trumped her Jewishness" ("Where are the Jewish Women?" in Dark Mirror, 2014). At the same time, Jewish women are ubiquitous in the legal and historical records of twelfth- and thirteenth-century England.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 1:09pm
full name / name of organization: 
UCLA

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

"Ruined!" On Failed Adaptations from Page to Screen | NeMLA 2016 (Abstract Submission Deadline: September 30, 2015)

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 12:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association

This session will explore adaptations that fail in some way. Among our goals, we would like to identify what could be productive about failed adaptations. How do such failures identify what not to do, and can an adaptation that fails to be faithful to its source material still produce a valuable, worthwhile text? We are particularly interested in proposals that look at the adaptation of older artistic and literary forms in online and/or interactive content.

Submit abstracts (300 words maximum) by September 30, 2015, to Session ID#15658 at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15658

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1968 and Global Cinema - panel at SCMS Atlanta 2015 - Abstracts due AUG 5

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:46am
full name / name of organization: 
Society for Cinema and Media Studies

CfP- 2016 SCMS - 1968 + Global Cinema - 3/30-4/3/16 - Atlanta, Georgia

1968 and Global Cinema

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference

Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

Although scholarship exists on the late 1960s New Waves, especially on in French New Wave vis-à-vis May '68 in Paris, scholarship that puts cinemas on 1968 into dialogue with one another across national boundaries is surprisingly lacking.

Gender and Emotion: Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2016, University of Hull, 6th - 8th January 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:27am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Hull
contact email: 

The grief-stricken faces at Edward's deathbed in the Bayeux Tapestry; the ambiguous 'ofermod' in The Battle of Maldon; the body-crumpling anguish of the Virgin witnessing the Man of Sorrows; the mirth of the Green Knight; the apoplectic anger of the mystery plays' Herod and the visceral visionary experiences of Margery of Kempe all testify to the ways in which the medieval world sought to express, perform, idealise and understand emotion.

[UPDATE] Transitions 6 Comic Symposium London

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:00am
full name / name of organization: 
Birkbeck, University of London

TRANSITIONS 6 – New Directions in Comics Studies 2015
Symposium – 31st October 2015, Birkbeck, University of London
Keynote: Dr. Mel Gibson (Northumbria University)
Respondent: Professor Roger Sabin (Central Saint Martins)
CALL FOR PAPERS
Deadline: 31st July 2015

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the forthcoming 6th Transitions symposium, promoting new research and multi-disciplinary academic study of comics/ comix/ manga/ bande dessinée and other forms of sequential art. We welcome abstracts for twenty minute papers as well as proposals for panels.
Possible topics include but are not limited to:

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference: Shakespearean Transformations, 8-11 September 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:41am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Hull
contact email: 

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives

University of Hull, 8-11 September 2016

www.hull.ac.uk/bsa2016

Keynote speakers:

Susan Bassnett (University of Warwick)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Michael Neill (University of Auckland)
Claudia Olk (Free University of Berlin)
Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides)
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)
Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

The Unsettling Politics of Nineteenth-Century Print, Abstract Deadline August 20

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:01am
full name / name of organization: 
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists
contact email: 

While earlier centuries had witnessed the global spread of print, the nineteenth century contributed a new major chapter to the history of print in the Atlantic world, a chapter full of unsettling ironies. In this century, print became more accessible, since printing offices, owing to improved printing technologies, effective dissemination channels, and low-cost formats, were able to produce more efficiently. With print more accessible and affordable, printed material soon developed into a product of mass consumption that formed an integral part of everyday culture in the nineteenth century. Consequently, nineteenth-century print generated new audiences throughout the Atlantic world, such as working-class, black, and female readers.

'Facts and Fictions' - First Workshop of 'The Art of Identification' Network, University of Birmingham, Tuesday 13 October 2015

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 2:36am
full name / name of organization: 
The Art of Identification

The Art of Identification network, funded by a networking grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intends to bring together a range of academics and practitioners in order to explore the interconnections between practical techniques of human identification and the artistic representation of personal identity. The methods by which people have proved, or been assigned, their identities have varied over time – from Early Modern insignia to the contemporary strobe light of a retinal scanner – and the term 'identification' can also be taken to mean a number of things, including the determination of individual personhood via paperwork, bodily examination, verbal testimony, and digital recording.

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

[UPDATE] [SCMS 2016 CFP] Spaces of Spectatorship: Architectures of the Projected Image

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 2:00pm
full name / name of organization: 
Swagato Chakravorty / Yale University

The dispositif of the moving and projected image, defying its ossification under the weight of seventies-era apparatus theory, has returned to prominence. Screen architectures and moving-image installations have characterized a large-scale reconfiguration and reimagination of the dispositifs of cinema in the decades leading from the late twentieth into the early twenty-first century. The architecture of the moving and projected image has been at the center of this renewed focus on the dispositif.

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