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NeMLA 2019 Panel: The Role of Literature in Contemporary Italian Philosophy

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:09pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Please consider submitting an abstract for the following session for the NeMLA 2019 Convention in Washington, DC (March 21-24):

 

The Role of Literature in Contemporary Italian Philosophy

 

Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer: Literary, Economic, Political, and Spiritual Approaches

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:19pm
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

It is hard to exaggerate the novelty of English Treasurer Richard fitz Nigel’s Dialogue of the Exchequer, completedc. 1179. Often considered Europe’s first administrative manual, it required the invention of a new genre, the systematic thinking-through of collected bureaucratic knowledge and its categorization and organization. Successive generations of historians have mined this text for data about England’s taxation office and common law, but it has much more to offer researchers of bureaucratic and institutional culture, medieval identity formation, and intertextuality. 

Approaches to Medieval Bureaucracies: A Roundtable

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:08pm
Special Session, 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Close to 100 years ago, T. F. Tout was able to claim in his magisterial six-volume study of England’s letter-writing offices that the administrative history of thirteenth- and fourteenth-century England was "largely unwritten.” Within the last ten or twenty years, however, historians have undertaken socio-cultural studies of medieval bureaucracy and its personnel, moving from prosopographical and biographical sketches to nuanced examinations of the experience and challenges of bureaucratic employment throughout Europe.

Engaging Difference: Supporting LD, ELL, First-in-family and Other Exceptional Learners

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:06pm
NeMLA, March 2019, Washington D.C.
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In typical college classrooms, instructors face large groups of highly diverse students. In fact, students are often so diverse that even their diversity is diverse. Differences in educational background, family support systems, English-language proficiency, abilities and disabilities, and more, can strongly impact students' capacities to fulfill course expectations.

But while "differentiation" has become a pervasive buzzword within K-12 pedagogy, in higher education it remains unclear exactly how, where, when, and whose responsibility it is to engage and support students with various learning challenges.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: Activism, Advocacy, and the Archive

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:06pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

While historical and literary archives have long been integral to the study of the humanities, they are more than simple repositories for historical artifacts. They don’t just preserve works and fragments to be studied, they help us, as scholars, to actively engage in the public sphere. As Randall C. Jimerson notes “Archivists can use the power of archives to promote accountability, open government, diversity, and social justice.” In doing so, archivists can democratize information and open up new avenues of knowing by employing ethical and objective—but not neutral—strategies. This can be especially important for subjugated communities, who’s histories and cultures have been bound and kept distinct.

South Asia in North America

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:05pm
Dr. Susmita Roye
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

South Asia in North America

 

This panel is proposed for Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) convention at Washington DC in March 2019.

In tune with the 2019 NeMLA convention theme of “Transnational Spaces: Intersections of Cultures, Languages, and Peoples”, this proposed panel aims to draw more scholarly focus on the theme of diversity and cultural interactions in the US. People from all around the world emigrate to the US and Canada, enriching their cultural texture. This panel will particularly concentrate on the immigrants from South Asia.

 

Some of the topics that it hopes to address are:

Music in Literature, NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:19pm
Julia Titus, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

A multidisciplinary research focusing on the complex interrelationship of music and literature has expanded rapidly in the recent years. There are numerous examples in European and American literatures, both in poetry and prose, where music plays a vital rolе (Leo Tolstoy, Chekhov, Proust, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, George Eliot, Henry James, and many others), and while there has been many published studies focusing on the formal relationship between the sister arts of music and literature (Steven Paul Scher “Literature and Music,” Werner Woft “The Musicalization of Fiction,” Delia de Souza Correa “George Eliot, Music and Victorian Culture”), there has not been much research focused specifically on music or musical performance within the text.

Aesthetics of Gentrification

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:35pm
SLOW LAB (University of Oregon, College of Design)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 8, 2018

Aesthetics of Gentrification: Art, Architecture, and Displacement

 

International Conference

University of Oregon in Portland

April 5-6, 2019

 

Organized by the University of Oregon SLOW LAB, this interdisciplinary conference brings together scholars from across the humanities, social sciences, and art and design fields to explore the aesthetic dimensions of gentrification in the present era of accelerated urbanism.

WITCHCRAFT HYSTERIA. Performing witchcraft in contemporary art and pop culture.

updated: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018 - 3:36am
Katharina Brandl and Johanna Braun / University of California, Los Angeles and University of Basel
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

We seem to be living in bewitched times. Witches are everywhere in pop culture, and we're also seeing victims of alleged "witch hunts" pop up all over the place, especially on Twitter and other social media. Pop-stars perform as witches: like Katy Perry in her performance at the 2014 Grammy awards, where she appeared in a cowl before a crystal ball, while later dancing with broomsticks as poles. Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade” (2016) made several explicit references to the historical figure Marie Laveau and magical witchcraft rituals drawn from Yoruba traditions.

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