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The Cultural Revolution Today: Literature, Film, and Cultural Debates

updated: 
Monday, January 25, 2016 - 3:31am
CEFC and the Department of Comparative Literature, HKU

May 2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the launching of China's "Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution." Historiography continues to debate the periodization of the Cultural Revolution, its impact among the urban elite, the political incentives of the Red Guard movement, the long-term influence of the rustication movement, and the mass violence that took place in the countryside.

NWSA2016 Conference Panel on Colonialism & Digital Games (Nov 10-12) DUE 15 FEB 2016

updated: 
Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 2:54pm
Kristin Bezio, University of Richmond

Seeing paper proposals for a panel entitled "(De)Colonizing Digital Gamespaces: Games, Gender, and (De)Colonial Praxis" at the NWSA 2016 Meeting in Montreal, Canada Nov. 10-12, 2016. Proposals due to kbezio@richmond.edu by 15 Feb. 2016.

Digital spaces are frequently referred to as a "new frontier," discourse which explicitly links digital media and colonial praxis. Similarly, digital games are encoded by deeply colonial—and imperial—ideologies which marginalize and often victimize women and people of color. Although the games industry has, in recent years, begun to be more inclusive of women and people of color in roles other than that of victim, most digital games and gaming spaces remain colonized.

Feasting, Fasting, Famine: Representations of Hunger in South Asian Literatures and Culture

updated: 
Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 11:48pm
Rajender Kaur

Feasting, Fasting, Famine: Representations of Hunger in South Asian Literatures and Culture

The South Asian and South Asian Diasporic Forum of the MLA invites proposals on theorizing the politics, aesthetics, ethics, affect, of figurations of hunger in South Asian literatures and cultures. Presentations may focus on hunger in a range of contexts including food insecurity and globalization; class, gender, imperial, postcolonial contexts; on memory, and memorialization, and the historiography of hunger. Among other contexts/aspects, papers may focus on hunger and the state; hunger and violence; hunger and migration; philanthropy/famine relief: a fundamental right or charity? Visual representations of hunger.

"Feeling Real": Affect, Literature, and Reimagined Realities - May 5-6, 2016 (Deadline Feb. 29)

updated: 
Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 8:23pm
British Modernities Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Keynote Speakers:
Professor Jonathan Flatley, Wayne State University
Professor Steven LaValle, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The British Modernities Group (BMG) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign invites graduate students to present papers at its eleventh annual interdisciplinary conference, "'Feeling Real': Affect, Literature, and Reimagined Realities," on May 5-6, 2016.

The Other Side of Memory: Forgetting, Denial, Repression (University of Illinois, 2-4 June 2016)

updated: 
Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 7:38pm
Mnemonics: Network for Memory Studies

The fifth Mnemonics: Network for Memory Studies summer school will take place from June 2-4, 2016 on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and will be hosted by the Initiative in Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies (HGMS). The theme of the 2016 event will be "The Other Side of Memory: Forgetting, Denial, Repression." Our keynote speakers will be Berber Bevernage (Ghent), Jodi A. Byrd (Illinois), and Françoise Vergès (Paris). Submissions are open to all graduate students interested in memory studies.

Traveling With Gulliver, around Campus--3/24

updated: 
Saturday, January 23, 2016 - 6:58pm
Joel Sodano, University at Albany & Michael Brown, University of Aberdeen

This call is inspired by the versatile, prescient and even protean prose of Dr. Swift's most well-known work, Gulliver's Travels (1726). If Gulliver had a "tenure home," it would definitely be in the department of English; however, because of its relevance to so many disciplinary fields (economics, history, philosophy, to name the most obvious) Gulliver's Travels is finding itself in an increasingly interdisciplinary range of college courses. We're seeking a variety of pedagogy-oriented submissions that give insight into the ways Gulliver's Travels is taught in higher education.
Here are some possible issues that the collection might explore:

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