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"Global Poe" Seminar for ACLA Conference at Harvard, Mar. 17-20, 2016 (submissions from Sept. 1-23, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 3:33pm
Emron Esplin / Department of English, Brigham Young University

The following CFP is for a seminar I have co-organized with Margarida Vale de Gato for the upcoming convention of the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) held from March 17-20, 2016 at Harvard University. ACLA's annual meeting uses a seminar format in which 8-15 participants meet together for 2-3 days to share their papers. To submit a paper, go to the ACLA website at www.acla.org, click on "annual meeting," and then click on "submit a paper." The website will not be accepting submissions until September 1. The CFP below is currently available under "Global Poe" on the ACLA website. After September 1, a link will be available for you to submit a paper directly to the seminar.

19th Annual Conference on the Harlem Renaissance at Paine College - Nov. 4-6, 2015

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 11:46am
Dr. Catherine Adams / Humanities Department at Paine College in Augusta, GA

2015 Theme: The Rise of Respectability and Rebelliousness: Gendered Perspectives of the New Negro Women and Men during the Renaissance

The Department of Humanities at Paine College is requesting proposals for the 19th Annual Conference on the Harlem Renaissance to be held on the campus of historic Paine College.

We are seeking presentations that draw from literature, history, philosophy, art, and music, as well as inter- and cross-disciplinary approaches from the social and political sciences, economics, and STEM.

Medievalism in Popular Culture, PCA/ACA, March 21-25, 2016, Seattle: Proposals Due 10/1/15

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 11:28am
PCA/ACA 2016 National Conference

PCA/ACA 2016 National Conference
March 21st - 25th, 2016 – Seattle, Washington

The Medievalism in Popular Culture Area (now the combined areas of Arthurian and Other Medievalism) accepts papers on all topics that explore either popular culture during the Middle Ages or transcribe some aspect of the Middle Ages into the popular culture of later periods. These representations can occur in any genre, including film, television, novels, graphic novels, gaming, advertising, art, etc. For this year's conference, I would like to encourage submissions on some of the following topics:

Shakespeare's Italy (abstract due Sept. 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 10:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel seeks participants interested in exploring the complex and multi-faceted relationship between Shakespeare and Italy. Key areas of focus will be, among other things, the impact of the Italian Renaissance on England; early modern English translations of Italian works; Shakespeare's use of Italian texts for both direct source and indirect inspiration; Italian settings and characters in Shakespeare's plays; the influence of Italian genres, such as tragicomedy, in Shakespeare's drama; early modern English attitudes towards Italy in general and certain Italians (such as Machiavelli) in particular; and later Italian adaptations of Shakespeare, particularly for the opera and for the cinema.

Paris on Film (abstract due Sept. 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 10:24am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel seeks participants interested in exploring the many different ways that the City of Light has been captured in films from a variety of countries. With the possible exception of New York, no city has been used as a setting as frequently as Paris. However, the French capital is unique in that it has been featured not only in French films but in films from around the world. This transnational element will be emphasized by this panel, which seeks to explore the contradictions inherent in filming such a contradictory city. For example, how can a city be seen as both the birthplace of the modern while also being so frequently being filmed - particularly in terms of its bohemianism - in such a nostalgic light?

Girls' Voices August 25, 2015; April 7-9, 2016

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Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 9:16am
International Girls' Studies Association Conference

Over the past few years, there has been an increasing concern about the prevalence of uptalk, vocal fry, and other markers of so-called Valley Girl-speak among young women across America. Some pundits question the individuality, confidence, believability, professionalism, and hirability of women who adopt these vocal patterns. Others object to them on aesthetic grounds, complaining that girly voices are just plain irritating. For many, if women are to have a metaphorical voice, they must carefully manage the prosody of their literal one.

Heidelberg Center for American Studies 13th Annual Spring Academy Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 - 8:59am
Heidelberg Center for American Studies

Heidelberg, Germany, 14-18 March, 2016

Call for Papers

The thirteenth HCA Spring Academy on American History, Culture, and Politics will be held from March 14-18, 2016. The Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) invites applications for this annual one-week conference that provides twenty international Ph.D. students with the opportunity to present and discuss their Ph.D. projects.

The HCA Spring Academy will also offer participants the chance to work closely with experts in their respective fields of study. For this purpose, workshops held by visiting scholars will take place during this week.

Teaching Post-Modern Native American Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 3:34pm
Carrie Louise Sheffield

Call For Papers: 2016 Native American and Literature Symposium

Panel Title: Teaching "Post-Modern" Native American and First Nations Literature

Many current (and not so current) Native American/First Nations texts exhibit the complex structures of post-modern literature, but are they really post-modern? And should we teach them as such?

Call for Chapter Proposals - Nationalism and Popular Culture

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 3:01pm
Tim Nieguth

Our world is a world of nations. The existence and fundamental importance of nations, national identities, or national boundaries is rarely questioned. Yet, the scholarly literature on nationalism has shown that national communities are socially constructed, that national identities are fluid, and that national boundaries are constantly contested. Clearly, maintaining nations requires a great deal of collective effort. How is it that this effort is rendered invisible? How have nations come to be seen as natural? Why do individuals buy into the idea of national identity?

ASECS -- The Objects of Performance (3/31/2016 - 4/3/2016)

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Monday, August 10, 2015 - 2:30pm
Ashley Bender / American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies

This panel seeks papers that consider the role of objects in the production and study of Restoration and eighteenth-century drama. How might a consideration of the physical and material conditions of performance shed light on the texts through which we so often engage with the drama? What do textual artifacts reveal about production practices or even specific performances? Please send 300-word abstracts.

Comment dit-on queer? Queer Theory in French

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 1:15pm
Adam J. Dexter / NeMLA

47th Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
17 March - 20 March 2016

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Sept. 30, 2015

[UPDATE] SCMS 2016 - Hollywood Dreams and Publicity Machines

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 12:54pm
Peter Labuza, University of Southern California

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference
Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

The irony of the title A Star Is Born is no longer surprising, as new histories have examined the way that publicity before, during, and after the Hollywood Classical Cinema has changed and developed the reception of films, stars, and more. While studying films can tell us much about the way they figure into larger histories, studying the way studios, agencies, and other distributors have presented and sold their work to the public can reveal much about both the economic and social issues of the time.

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