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Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities

updated: 
Saturday, March 26, 2011 - 3:22pm
Preserve the Eatonville Community, Inc. (P.E.C.)

Scholars and other interested parties are invited to submit papers for the 2013 Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities (January 26th-February 3rd). The Festival theme is "The Rise of Community: The Town of Eatonville Models 125 Years of Self-Governance."

UPDATE -- Textus: Gothic Frontiers. Abstracts by 1 June, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, March 26, 2011 - 12:18pm
Francesca Saggini and Glennis Byron

Textus: English Studies in Italy No. 3 – 2012: Gothic Frontiers
Editors: Francesca Saggini (Università della Tuscia) and Glennis Byron (University of Stirling)

This issue of Textus aims to showcase and provide further space for debate and discussion to researchers engaged in exploring, testing and redrawing the expansive frontiers of gothic and its multiple, evolving discourses.

Backward Glances: 31st August - 1st September

updated: 
Friday, March 25, 2011 - 6:44am
University College, Cork

Call For Papers:

Backward Glances: History, Imagination, and Memory
University College Cork, Ireland.
31st August – 1st September 2011

[UPDATE] ***Could you hear that? Interdisciplinary approaches to sound and music.***

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 11:33pm
LASA2012 May 23-26 *San Francisco*

The 2012 LASA Congress will be dedicated to the bicentennial of national independence in most of the countries in Latin America. The aim of this panel is to generate a forum of discussion and theoretical intervention between and within musical discourse and questions of identity. How does music and its components, such as sounds and silences, promote or interfere with the creation of "national unities"? Are "samba", "tango" and "salsa" inclusive genres of collective identities? And if this is the case, what kinds of dissonances should we consider in order to gain a more profound understanding of these acoustic events?

Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education (Journal) - articles by 6/15/11

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 5:56pm
Dr. Susan Alice Fischer, Co-Editor

The editors seek articles concerned with English language, literacy and literature teaching worldwide as well as essays on literature and culture that do not specifically address teaching.

Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education is an established journal (published by Routledge) for English teachers at all levels, including college and university, which encourages international dialogue between teachers and researchers on issues surrounding literacy, language, literature and culture. In particular, Changing English considers the future of English as a subject in the context of its history and the scope for development and change.

UPDATE Food and Identity (SAMLA Nov. 4-6, 2011)

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 11:48am
Marta Hess/South Atlantic Modern Language Association

Food identifies us. The ways in which we prepare, consider, consume, discuss, and build traditions around food and foodways all contribute to the ways that we see ourselves and that others see us. Food and the rituals that surround it can both unite and divide us. Janet Theophano in Eat My Words notes the stories that women tell through the cookbooks they write, and in Hungering for America, Hasia Diner connects identity, food, and the immigration experience. Additionally, films demonstrate the performance aspects of food: Big Night and Like Water for Chocolate entice viewers with their lush images, while at the same time they signify stormy family issues.

Food and Identity

updated: 
Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 11:41am
Marta Hess/SAMLA

Food identifies us. The ways in which we prepare, consider, consume, discuss, and build traditions around food and foodways all contribute to the ways that we see ourselves and that others see us. Food and the rituals that surround it can both unite and divide us. Janet Theophano in Eat My Words notes the stories that women tell through the cookbooks they write, and in Hungering for America, Hasia Diner connects identity, food, and the immigration experience. Additionally, films demonstrate the performance aspects of food: Big Night and Like Water for Chocolate entice viewers with their lush images, while at the same time they signify stormy family issues.

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