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Performing Knowledge (deadline 9/30/10; NEMLA April 7-10, 2011)

updated: 
Monday, August 30, 2010 - 2:59pm
John Savarese, Rutgers University

This panel invites papers that examine how literary texts perform knowledge, and how literature becomes an object of scholarly knowledge in a variety of disciplinary settings. Panelists might address literary representations of the cleric, the virtuoso, or the pedant; the use of scholarly paratexts (the gloss, the appendix, the footnote); or, more broadly, the influence of disciplinarity and professionalization on the literary text. For more information, see below.

Send abstracts to Sean Barry, sean.barry@rutgers.edu, and John Savarese, john.savarese@rutgers.edu, by 9/30/10.

NeMLA 2011: New Brunswick, NJ, April 7-10, 2011.

UPDATE: Literary Dress: Fashioning the Fictional Self (deadline 9/30/10)

updated: 
Monday, August 30, 2010 - 12:00pm
NEMLA 2011 (April 6-10, Rutgers NJ)

Literary Dress: Fashioning the Fictional Self

Fashion, fabricate, artifice, make-up: all these terms have a double valence. Each term in noun form denotes a prosthetic application of something foreign atop something natural (usually a human body) with the intention of concealing or enhancing the natural item beneath. Each term in verb form, though, carries a connotation of constitution and creation: a sense of literal "becoming," or even investiture. In some way, these terms gesture towards the ephemeral, frivolous, and the temporary AND towards a sense of ontological making.

UPDATE Collection of Essays on the Role of Music in Multicultural Activism

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Monday, August 30, 2010 - 11:14am
Ed. Lindsay Michie Eades, Eunice Rojas

This book is a two volume series of essays telling stories of the ways in which music has propelled resistance and revolutionary movements in the United States and around the world from the gospel music of slavery in the antebellum South to anti-apartheid freedom songs in South Africa.
The two-volume series will illustrate a consistent pattern of musical influence on political resistance movements by providing accounts describing a vast array of musical styles from diverse parts of the world. One volume will cover movements in the U.S. and the other will have an international focus. The purpose of this series is to encompass a wide perspective on the role of music in political activism.

[UPDATE]: Iconoclasm: The Breaking and Making of Images, March 17-19, 2011

updated: 
Monday, August 30, 2010 - 11:04am
Rachel Stapleton, Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

Abstracts for Iconoclasm due September 10, 2010

"Iconoclasm", featuring keynote addresses by Carol Mavor (Manchester) and Michael Taussig (Columbia), will take place at the University of Toronto, March 17-19, 2011.

We accept abstracts of no more than 250 words for talks of 20 minutes on a range of topics related to the breaking and making of images.
For full CFP and FAQs please visit Iconoclasm Website

CFP Literary Dress: Fashioning the Fictional Self (deadline 9/30/10)

updated: 
Monday, August 30, 2010 - 10:53am
NEMLA 2011 (April 6-10, Rutgers NJ)

Literary Dress: Fashioning the Fictional Self

Fashion, fabricate, artifice, make-up: all these terms have a double valence. Each term in noun form denotes a prosthetic application of something foreign atop something natural (usually a human body) with the intention of concealing or enhancing the natural item beneath. Each term in verb form, though, carries a connotation of constitution and creation: a sense of literal "becoming," or even investiture. In some way, these terms gesture towards the ephemeral, frivolous, and the temporary AND towards a sense of ontological making.

[UPDATE] DEADLINE EXTENDED: From Here to There and Back Again: Allusion, Adaptation and Appropriation (10/21-10/22/2010)

updated: 
Monday, August 30, 2010 - 10:49am
University of Florida English Graduate Organization

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2010 University of Florida Graduate Conference
October 21-22

Keynote Speaker: Douglas Lanier, University of New Hampshire

Author of Shakespeare and Modern Popular Culture (2002)

The English Graduate Organization of the University of Florida invites papers from across the discipline(s) concerning textual adaptation or appropriation. Adaptation and appropriation, regarding questions of performance, translation, and occasionally plagiarism, concern both new and old media. The process of becoming or the process of naming a text are formulated on sometimes vague thresholds or border lines when one text becomes another.

[UPDATE] Humanities in the Digital Age

updated: 
Sunday, August 29, 2010 - 11:58pm
English Graduate Organization (EGO), Western Illinois University


EGO Conference: Humanities in the Digital Age
October 22 & 23, 2010
Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL

DEADLINE EXTENDED: October 1, 2010

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Amy E. Earhart, Texas A&M University

Conference website: http://www.wiu.edu/ego/conference/2010/

Conference Theme: Humanities in the Digital Age

Contemporary society is pervaded by the culture of computing, and digitization continues to create new processes and patterns. In My Mother Was a Computer, Katherine Hayles remarks,

Samuel Beckett's Bilingualism at NEMLA Convention, New Brunswick, New Jersey, April 7-10, 2011

updated: 
Sunday, August 29, 2010 - 10:59pm
Nadia Louar

Session: Samuel Beckett's Bilingualism
This panel will address the specific question of bilingualism in the work of Samuel Beckett. How can we understand this unique literary language? Can Beckett's bilingualism be understood as a phenomenon that goes beyond linguistic boundaries? Please submit 300-500 word abstracts in French or English on any aspect of Beckett's bilingualism to Nadia Louar, Email : louarn@uwosh.edu. (Deadline September 30th, 2011)

The Poetics of Metadata (proposals due October 10, 2010; STS conference March 16-18, 2011
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updated: 
Sunday, August 29, 2010 - 10:44pm
Paul Benzon / Society for Textual Scholarship

Recent critical trends in media studies have emphasized various aspects of and approaches to the materiality of technology and media information, with methodologies including digital forensics, platform studies, and critical code studies offering both a deep interest in the close reading of technology and a jumping-off point towards multiple larger literary, cultural, and philosophical questions. This panel seeks to build upon and extend those methodologies by focusing in particular on metadata—data about data—as a category of inquiry. How does metadata relate to data in discursive, informational, and ontological terms? How and to what extent does metadata inform the materiality of technology?

19th Century America: CEA 2011 | FORTUNES I 42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida

updated: 
Sunday, August 29, 2010 - 9:55pm
College English Association

Call for Papers: 19th Century America at CEA 2011

Body:
Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference.

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