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NEMLA 2011: "My dwelling place among you": Faith and Landscape in the Middle Ages. (deadline 9/30/10; NEMLA 4/7/11-4/10/11)

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 2:41pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association. New Brunswick, New Jersey, April 7-10, 2011

This panel seeks papers addressing the following questions: To what extent does cosmology inform representations of place? To what extent are representations of places in medieval texts dependent upon Scriptural authority? How do medieval landscapes—literal or textual—self-consciously mirror Biblical landscapes? In what ways do medieval narratives explicitly reference Biblical landscapes as an aid to commentary upon social or political concerns of their day? As the significance of place is increasingly significant for our own conceptions of who we are, understanding the significance of place for medieval writers is as crucial for our understanding of who they were.

Tracing Stillness in Photography and Cinema-2011 SCMS Panel in New Orleans (03/10-03/13)

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 1:25pm
Louise Hornby/Tulane University

This panel aims to address questions about medium and the historical and contemporary relationship between still photography and the moving image. In an effort to rethink classical film theory's understanding of photography and film as opposed media, the panel seeks papers that demonstrate how and why photography and photographic stillness matter for film.

How does photography gain visibility in the context of other time-based media? How have images of stillness informed a history of cinema? Is stillness a function of temporal scale? How do photography and photographic stillness participate in the current transition to digital media? Is stillness solely the purview of photography? How have the lines between photography and film become muddied?

[UPDATE] The Apocalypse and its Discontents (9/1/10; 12/11/10)

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 1:24pm
University of Westminster

UPDATE:

We are now delighted to announce two more keynote speakers for the conference, Professor John R. Hall from UC Davies, California, and Dr Patricia Wheeler from the University of Hertfordshire, UK.

We still welcome abstracts for what promises to be an exciting event by the set deadline of 1 September 2010.

Original CFP follows below:

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THE 21ST ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE AND EXPERIENCES (CACE)

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 10:26am
African American Studies Program/University of North Carolina at Greensboro

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
FOR THE
21ST ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE AND EXPERIENCES (CACE)

Hosted by the African American Studies Program
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
October 14‐16, 2010

Theme: EXPLORING BLACK MASCULINITIES ACROSS MULTIPLE
LANDSCAPES: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

In the spirit of the theme, we invite participants to share their scholarly, literary, and/or artistic expressions in any one or more of the following formats: Individual Paper, Poster, and Panels.

CFP: Reshaping the Italian American identity--DEADLINE Sept.1st 2010

updated: 
Thursday, July 15, 2010 - 8:22am
Italian American studies panel / NeMLA 2011

This interdisciplinary panel seeks for papers focusing on the question of identity in the Italian American experience from different perspective. Research in the fields of history, ethnography, literature, sociology and anthropology over the past decades have demonstrated how the building process of an identity remains an open quandary in particular regarding the Italian American experience. The mediatic imagery of the last years (mis)portraying the Italian American adults as "Sopranos" or the youth culture as a world of "Guidos" and "Guidettes" (e.g. Jersey Shore) witness the complexity of a shaped Italian American identity undergoing a process of adaptation.

Detective-Mystery Area April 20-23, 2011

updated: 
Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 5:46pm
Popular Culture/American Culture Association

The Detective/Mystery Area of Popular Culture Assoc. is interested in individual papers and organized panels on any area of detective fiction, including, but not limited to theory, criticism, history. We are particularly looking at topics such as race, ethnicity, other media, mixed genre, GLBT, etc. Send proposal of 150-200 words, also include a 50 word bio, to both co-chairs. Please make sure to include correct and complete contact information--affiliation, email, address, phone number--on the proposal itself. Also indicate the broad category of paper--hard-boiled, police procedural, cozy, etc.

First time presenters are eligible to submit their paper for the Earl Award. Contact co-chairs for more information.

Lawman and the Word: a Roundtable Discussion (9/15; Kalamazoo 5-12-5-15)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 5:01pm
International Lawman's Brut Society

The International Lawman's Brut society announces a roundtable discussion, "Lawman and the Word." Please submit abstracts for a brief (ten minute) discussion of a single word or phrase from the Brut. Papers may focus on the history of a specific word or term from the text, its significance to the poem as a whole, or on other issues. This session will build on work that has been done on word choice and on single words in the Brut, including "lawen," "freondcipe," and others.

WINNOWING CHAFF: Constructing Morals and Contesting Universals in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales [deadline: September 1st]

updated: 
Wednesday, July 14, 2010 - 3:56pm
46th International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 12-15, 2011)

Considering The Canterbury Tales exclusively, this panel seeks to investigate Chaucer's engagement with the epistemological and ontological debate over universals. The works of Geoffrey Chaucer are heavily influenced by Platonic, Aristotelian, and Boethian philosophies; these philosophical authorities inform Chaucer's poetic meaning. Because The Canterbury Tales is situated in the midst of long-evolving and newly emerging philosophical debates, such as the dispute between Realists and Nominalists, any morality extracted from the tales must be understood in accordance with the (textual) construction of meaning.

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