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interdisciplinary

Mind and American Literature book series

updated: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 12:35pm
Camden House publishers

We welcome proposals for books that consider American prose and poetry from interdisciplinary perspectives, including psychology, philosophy, and neurology. For information, please contact Linda Simon, Skidmore College.

Conscripted Subjects: Disciplined Society, Critique, and the Humanities (grad), Feb 23-25, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 10:42am
Department of Comparative Literature, UCLA

In light of our current moment marked by economic collapse, heightened political paranoia, racial profiling, and ubiquitous surveillance, this conference wishes to highlight the connection between states of crisis and the wider social question of the prison as a space of social production. "Discipline" as such does not simply imply policies that police subjects, but rather policies that produce them — not just in "correctional facilities," but also in the discourses and practices appropriated by universities, workplaces, hospitals, and bureaucracies. In this regard, we seek to question the normalization of the prison as a model for social relations between classes, sexes, races, and other subjectivities.

[UPDATE]: Iconoclasm: The Breaking and Making of Images, March 17-19, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 9:42am
Rachel Stapleton, Centre for Comparative Literature, University of Toronto

Iconoclasm: The Breaking and Making of Images
University of Toronto, March 17–19, 2011

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS NOW CONFIRMED: Carol Mavor, University of Manchester, and Michael Taussig, Columbia University.

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 10, 2010

The Tenth Annual Wenshan International Conference: The City and Literature: A Geography of Culture and Space

updated: 
Tuesday, August 10, 2010 - 3:39am
English Department, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan

The reciprocal relationship of literature and the city reveals a complexity of urban life that has given rise to literary imagery and themes that define our understanding of the city. Novelists and poets contrast ideal cities with earthly cities, culture with nature, the mechanical with the organic, and the city with nature. These writers embrace our ambivalence toward the city that captivates but threatens, excites but intimidates, showing us the potential for greatness along with the fear of failure.

Call for Papers on Segmenting Audiences and Publics

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 9:24pm
PRism Online Public Relations Journal

This special call asks the question, what is the climate of publics-based research in public relations, and what are current challenges and approaches to the strategic segmentation of publics by organizations? The purpose of this special issue is to re-examine and question the basic set of assumptions and will serve as the natural extension of Vasquez and Taylor's (2001) call to explore publics in greater depth and through multiple prisms: "The challenge for public relations scholars and professionals is twofold: to demystify the ambiguity of a public and to link theory with practice for more effective relationships with publics" (p. 154).

[UPDATE] Medieval Association of the Midwest CFP Deadline: Aug. 16, 2010

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 5:20pm
Medieval Association of the Midwest

We welcome paper and panel proposals that address any aspect of the Middle Ages. In keeping with MAM's philosophy of inclusiveness, we encourage the submission of proposals from all branches of medieval studies, including but not limited to archaeology, art, bibliography, history, language, literature, music, philosophy, religion, and science.

Theories of Life in the 20th and 21st Centuries - Rutgers University - February 26, 2011

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 1:09pm
Rutgers English 20th Century Group
    Theories of Life in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Interdisciplinary Humanities Conference

Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Saturday, February 26, 2011

Plenary Speaker: Donna V. Jones, UC Berkeley English, author of The Racial Discourses of Life Philosophy: Négritude, Vitalism and Modernity. Columbia University Press, 2010.

Sponsored by: Rutgers English Department 20th Century Group, Rutgers Women and Gender Studies Department, the Institute for Research on Women.

[UPDATE] House and Home in 20th Century American Film and Literature (conference 4/2011; abstract due 9/30/2010)

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 12:53pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

From Blanche Dubois' Belle Reve to Esperanza Cordero's house on Mango Street, houses—and the affiliated, if more abstract, idea of home—figure prominently in 20th century American literature and film. The 20th century, after all, is characterized by both inter- and intra-national migrations which have, invariably, entailed the loss of one home, followed by the acquisition of another. Moreover, the 20th century has seen a steady increase in both actual home ownership and the imaginative importance of owning a home. At the start of the 20th century, 46.5% of Americans—less than one in two—were homeowners but, by 2000, that number had risen to 66.2%, or two in three.

Memory and Collective Identity in Comparative Literature and Others

updated: 
Monday, August 9, 2010 - 5:06am
452ºF Journal of Comparative Literature

On July 31st 2010, we start the CFP for the fourth issue of 452ºF Journal
of Literary Theory and Comparative Literature.This CFP is open and
addressed to anyone that wishes to and that holds at least a BA degree.

The bidding terms, which are exposed below and that regulate the reception
and publication of the different articles are subject to the content of
the Peer review System, the Style-sheet and the Legal Notice. These can be
consulted in the Procedures area of the web page.

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