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[UPDATE] deadline extended to January 11, 2016

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 5:03pm
Space Between Society: Literature and Culture 1914-1945

The 18th annual conference of the Space Between Society focuses on the concept of surveillance—watching, listening, recording—as it relates to literature, art, history, music, theatre, media, and spatial or material culture between 1914 and 1945. From the rise of totalitarianism to the dwindling borders of the British Empire, global citizens were under constant scrutiny as governments, artists, and documentarians developed new ways of listening in.

CFP: Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders Transnational Studies Graduate Conference

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 4:36pm
Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders

Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders: A Graduate Student Conference
in Transnational American Studies (7th Annual) at Binghamton University

Theme: "Occupying Nations and Exceptional (dis)Placements"

Date: Saturday, April 9, 2016

Keynote: Professor Anne McClintock

Deadline for Proposal Submission: March 2nd, 2016

Call for Proposals: Social Justice for LGBTQ Identities in the Borderlands (Submission Deadline Dec. 14, 2015)

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 3:38pm
J. Paul Taylor Social Justice Symposium

Social Justice for LGBTQ Identities in the Borderlands/Justicia Social para las Identidades LGBTQ en la Región Fronteriza

New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, March 21-25, 2016

Call for Proposals/Convocatoria para propuestas

Submission deadline/Plazo: December 14, 2015 / 14 diciembre 2015


New website "Why Social Theory?" Seeks Pedagogy Contributors

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 1:08pm
"Why Social Theory?"

The Committee on Social Theory at the University of Kentucky is excited to announce our forthcoming project, the website "Why Social Theory?"

This site is designed to become the premiere source for scholars on the subject of Social Theory. As part of the website, we are designing a resource of pedagogical materials for a section on teaching. These contributions can include:

Roots and Routes: Exploring Movement, Mobility, and Belonging (20-21 May 2016)

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 1:05pm
Endnotes: UBC English Graduate Conference

Roots and Routes: Exploring Movement, Mobility, and Belonging

Date: 20-21 May.

Location: UBC, Vancouver, Canada.

Deadline for Abstracts: 31 January 2016

Keynote Speakers: Caren Kaplan, University of California, Davis and Miranda Burgess, University of British Columbia.

What does it mean to be from a place or a position? To move from one position to another? What does it mean to be "moved" by an aesthetic experience?

[UPDATE] Call for Proposals - Due December 14, 2015

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 12:20pm
Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference

The 11th Annual Midwest Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference (MIGC)



KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. Levi Bryant (Collin College)

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee
February 19–20, 2015
Deadline: December 7, 2015

"Do you see the slightest evidence anywhere in the universe that creation came to an end with the birth of man? Do you see the slightest evidence anywhere out there that man was the climax toward which creation had been straining from the beginning? ...Very far from it." ― Daniel Quinn, Ishmael

What is meant when we consider something to be in process?

[Update] Reconstruction 17.2: Fantasy Sports

Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 8:28am
Andrew J. Ploeg / Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture

Fantasy sports are one of the most popular and rapidly expanding areas of contemporary culture. Despite the immense interest in them, however, fantasy sports remain an insufficiently mined scholarly resource. While studies on the topic have been published over the past fifteen years, they have focused almost exclusively on issues of law (e.g., Are fantasy sports a form of gambling?), economics (e.g., Who should profit from sports statistics?), and sports management (e.g., Who plays fantasy sports and why?). We contend that this limited approach has contributed to fantasy sports research being considered a minor scholarly niche, rather than a diverse subject area rife with its own unique cultural insights.