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Purim: Conventional and Not Readings

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 3:55pm
American Academy of Religion--Western Region
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

American Academy of Religion (AARWR), Western Region, Jewish Studies UnitLoyala Marymount University, Los Angeles, CaliforniaAddress: 1 LMU Drive, Lost Angeles, CA 90045March 10-12, 2017Conference Theme: 
Religion, Race, and Racism Jewish Studies Unit: ADDENDUM: Because of the recent death of Elie Wiesel, the Jewish Studies Unit also invites papers regarding his many contributions. 

The Biannual International Margaret Cavendish Society Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Lisa Walters/Liverpool Hope University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 9, 2017

The International Margaret Cavendish Society is pleased to announce that the next biannual conference is set to take place on June 22nd-24th, 2017 at Bates College, Maine. Professor Carolyn Merchant from the University of California, Berkeley, will be the keynote speaker.  Preference will be given to abstracts that closely relate to the conference theme, but all talks about Cavendish, her family, and related subjects will be considered.   The conference theme is "Margaret Cavendish: Reception and Representations."   Cavendish has increasingly garnered intense academic interest during the past twenty five years by scholars from a wide range of disciplines such as literature, history of science, philosophy, history and politics.

I <3 Pop

updated: 
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 - 4:12pm
The Comparative Literature Department at the Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

I <3 POP: An Interdisciplinary Conference

November 10-11, 2016. Keynote speaker: TBD

Department of Comparative Literature at The Graduate Center, CUNY; New York, NY

“If I had to choose between the Doors and Dostoyevsky, then—of course—I’d choose Dostoyevsky. But do I have to choose?” –Susan Sontag

There seems to be no end to the anxieties, fantasies, pleasures, and possibilities of pop culture—how we consume it, avoid it, appreciate it, and allow it to inform our identities. Yet, can we theorize pop today? And if so, to what extent are we obligated to do so?

On Breath

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 3:06pm
University of Toronto
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

CFP for the "On Breath"-Panel at the ACLA Convention 2017, University of Utrecht, June 6-9 2017

 

“Under these conditions, the individual’s breathing is an observed, an occupied breathing. It is a combat breathing.” (Frantz Fanon)

 “Das Gedicht bleibt [...] pneumatisch berührbar.” (Paul Celan)

“The HEART, by way of the BREATH, to the LINE.” (Charles Olson)

“Pas de parole sans air qui la véhicule.” (Luce Irigaray)

“Je suis un respirateur.” (Marcel Duchamp)

 

CFP: Climates of disaster and performance (Special Issue of Akda: The Asian Journal of Literature, Culture, Performance, for release in March 2017)

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:22pm
De La Salle University, Manila
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

CFP: Climates of disaster and performance  (Special Issue of Akda: The Asian Journal of Literature, Culture, Performance, for release in March 2017)

 Taking off from the theme of the Philippine cluster event of PSi#21: Fluid States in 2015, the second issue of Akda: The Asian Journal of Literature, Culture, Performance, which will be its first themed issue on performance, will feature papers from the November 2015 conference ibut is open to new submissions and will be fully double-blind peer reviewed.

Novels of the Holocaust: Fundamental Pedagogical Issues

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

 

The aim of this roundtable is to present possible guidelines and book selections for a hypothetical undergraduate course in “Novels of the Holocaust.” The panel will be resolutely international and open to books originally published in any language. As this roundtable is sponsored by NeMLA’s comparative literature director, participants are not obliged to use or refer to English translations if they wish to use original texts. The course that might be called the “target course” may be for any undergraduate level and for any country.

While this is roundtable is meant to follow the interests of its participants and not impose any institutional rigidities, seven particular themes or questions seem especially important.

Berlin in Film and Fiction: From the Cold War to German Reunification

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Since 1945, Berlin has become a cultural Weltstadt in many ways; this panel would like to focus on three of them. First, the contemporary situation of Berlin in reunified Germany serves as a lens for the flow of people, ideas, rinfluences between Europe and the rest of the world. Second, from 1945-1989, most of the tensions of the Cold War converged in Berlin. Third, for both of these reasons, today a large number of films, novels, and TV programs are set in Berlin, thus making it a privileged place of cultural representation. The purpose of this panel is to study all three of these situations from an international and comparative point of view.

Albert Camus, Our Contemporary?

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

The present literary reputation of Albert Camus is both fascinating and instructive. It is fascinating because, on the one hand, his work is all but absent from global university curricula; yet, he is one of the most widely read authors on the planet. Who has not read The Stranger or The Myth of Sisyphus?

Moreover, Camus and his work are instructive for many reasons.

Revisiting the Great War: From Text to Context

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

World War I marked one of the great turning points in the political, social, and cultural history of Europe and the world.  This panel explores the lived, daily experience of this war by looking at five different forms. Presenters can address these forms in isolation or show the relationships between them. 

First, presenters may analyze and evaluate the experience of the Great War through its literary texts, diaries, or journals. Presenters are encouraged to choose a single passage or two in order to explore the concrete experience of the war. The texts may focus on soldiers, civilians or both. Any text—on the fronts or at home—are suitable for this panel. 

Nietzsche and the Literature of the 19th Century

updated: 
Monday, July 18, 2016 - 2:18pm
Richard Schumaker Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

In his lifetime, Nietzsche referred to over 150 nineteenth-century writers in both his published writings and Nachlaß. Nietzsche’s use of nineteenth-century fiction and poetry ranges from somewhat nonchalant to extremely systematic. Indeed, the cornerstone of his “Advent of European Nihilism” in the late 1880s is the decline or decadence of literature during Nietzsche’s lifetime.

The panel attempts to focus on passages, individual novels or poems, and complete bodies of work in order to assess Nietzsche’s use of these texts in his philosophical project.

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