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interdisciplinary

[UPDATE] after the end: medieval studies, the humanities, and the post-catastrophe

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 4:51pm
Eileen A. Joy/The BABEL Working Group

This conference will bring together medievalists with scholars and theorists working in later periods in the humanities in order to collectively take up the broad question of what happens "after the end," by which we mean after the end of the affair, the end of the world, and everything in between. After gender, sex, love, the family, the nation-state, the body, the human, language, truth, feeling, reason, ethics, modernity, politics, religion, God, the nation-state, secularism, liberalism, the humanities, the university, teleology, progress, history, historicism, narrative, meaning, the individual, singularity, theory, practice, what else is there?

Physician/Pastor, Doctor/Divine: Intersections of Religion and Medicine, NeMLA Apr 7-10, 2011 [Abstracts due 9/30]

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 4:10pm
Ashley Reed and Kelly Bezio

From Cotton Mather's *The Angel of Bethesda* to the television drama *House, M.D.*, purveyors of American culture remain preoccupied with the intertwining roles of the physician and the pastor. Mather's assertion that illness is sin and medical cures can be found by cleansing the soul invokes related anxieties about medicine thwarting divine will. Nathaniel Hawthorne's stories of mad scientists and William Wells Brown's condemnation of medical experiments on enslaved Africans speak to the fear of medicine infringing on the dictates of the divine--a tension that continues today as medical dramas pit the "miracles" of Western medical therapeutics against the "wonders" of faith.

DEADLINE: June 20th -- Problematizing Religious Oratory Rhetoric in the Streets and the Pulpit

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 3:16pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association

This session seeks submissions that examine the relationships and intersections of rhetoric and religion. Topics include, but are not limited to investigating the rhetorical elements of homiletics; theology and logology; historical analysis of religious rhetoric development; methodology; religion, rhetoric and space; intersections of race, class and gender; language and practice; and controversies within the field. We are particularly interested in proposals that skirt or problematize traditional interpretations of religious oratory rhetoric.

The Rhetoric of Violence in the Early Modern Era, Deadline 30th November 2010

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 7:18am
Nathalie Rivere de Carles - Pascale Drouet

The Rhetoric of Violence in the Early Modern Era

We invite submissions for the 2011 issue of Cahiers Shakespeare en devenir-Shakespearean Afterlives. These might include essays (6000-7000 words including notes) for the issue proper, and review-essays (2-3000 words) or reviews of plays or exhibitions (1000-1500 words) for the issue's supplement L'Oeil du spectateur.

Collection CFP: Attached to Fiction: Trauma, Loss, Pleasure (4 October, 2010)

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 6:03am
Dr Hila Shachar and Dr Sophie Sunderland/English and Cultural Studies, University of Western Australia

Collection Call for Papers:

Attached to Fiction: Trauma, Loss, Pleasure

Editors: Dr Hila Shachar and Dr Sophie Sunderland, English and Cultural Studies, University of Western Australia

Contact email: attachedtofiction@gmail.com

"Mr Sakamoto said that reading had saved his life. Not mathematics. Not money. Not travel. Reading. At a time, he said, when he felt blasted by images, words had anchored him, secured him, stopped his free-falling plunge into nowhere."

-Gail Jones, Dreams of Speaking (London: Harvill Secker, 2006), p. 132.

Legal Fictions, NEMLA, April 7-10, 2011

updated: 
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 10:33pm
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association

The concept of a "legal fiction"—"a supposition avowedly false, but treated as if it were true, for the imagined convenience of administering the law" (Lewis, 1832)—describes the pretenses that disguise changes in the application of a legal rule. However, as its terminological indebtedness to the institution of fiction underscores, the concept also offers a suggestive rubric for understanding the nexus between law and literature—reminding us that law, as much as literature, is an unstable amalgam of fact and fiction. Examining the fictional elements of law, nonetheless, need not end only in textual ambiguity. The characterization of extant laws as mere fictions of the state has often been a strategy for political critique and legal reform.

Ecocriticism Sessions at NeMLA (4/7-11/11; 9/30/10)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 9:37pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Call for Papers in Ecocriticism
at
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick
Host Institution: Rutgers University

Among the 370 Sessions accepting abstracts are the following looking for essays on ecocritical issues:

Drama at NeMLA (4/7-11/11; 9/30/11

updated: 
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 9:11pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Call for Papers for Drama
at

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick
Host Institution: Rutgers University

Among the 370 Sessions accepting abstracts are the following looking for essays on drama and theatre:

Call for Chapters: Baseball in Class (UPDATE: Abstracts due September 1, 2010)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 5:31pm
Ron Kates/Middle Tennessee State University

This scholarly multidisciplinary anthology examines the intersection of baseball and class in American and global cultures. While embracing the rich history of themes of class and class conflict in baseball fiction, poetry, and drama, this collection also seeks to extend the discussion throughout other disciplines, some even far afield from literary studies. For example, one could examine the significant spike in costs related to attending a game at, say, Wrigley Field, and perhaps reach a determination that Cub management prefers a certain type or class of fan, almost to the point of excluding others.

The Beautiful Prison

updated: 
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 - 11:14pm
Doran Larson, Hamilton College & Attica CF

The Beautiful Prison

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