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Shaping Modernism: Katherine Mansfield and her Contemporaries - University of Cambridge, UK - 25-26th March 2011

updated: 
Friday, June 4, 2010 - 9:48am
Alice Kelly and Dr Kate Kennedy / University of Cambridge

Shaping Modernism: Katherine Mansfield and her Contemporaries

A two-day Conference in association with the Katherine Mansfield Society

25-26th March 2011
Faculty of English, University of Cambridge, UK

I was only thinking last night people have hardly begun to write yet. Put poetry out of it for a moment & leave out Shakespeare – now I mean prose. Take the very best of it. Aren't they still cutting up sections rather than tackling the whole of a mind? (Katherine Mansfield, 1921)

ASETEL 2011: 1st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE SPANISH ASSOCIATION OF LITERARY THEORY

updated: 
Friday, June 4, 2010 - 6:36am
Azucena G. Blanco

CALL FOR PAPERS
1st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE
SPANISH ASSOCIATION OF LITERARY THEORY (ASETEL)
Granada, January 26-28, 2011
Faculty of Philosophy and Literature of the University of Granada (Campus de Cartuja, s / n)
CONFERENCE THEMES
Literary Theory and Literary Genres
Comparative Literature and Postcolonial Studies
Aesthetics, Hermeneutics, Theory of Literary Knowledge
Sociology of Literature
Cultural Studies: Literature, Film, New Media
PLENARY SESSIONS
The Conference will feature five one-hour keynote speeches, one for each theme. The
ASETEL Board of Directors and the Local Organizing Committee have received confirmation of

The Feminist Art Movement: Beyond NYC/LA Due Date: January 1, 2011

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 7:51pm
Special Issue of Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies

In 2006 and 2007 twin events, the creation of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum and the mounting of WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, created the sense that the 1970s feminist art movement had finally found its place in the art historical record. But significant lacunae still exist. Contemporary analyses largely focus on individual artists located in major metropolitan areas, particularly the American art centers of New York and Los Angeles or major Western European cities. Consideration of the connections among feminist artists, the movement aspect of the feminist art movement, are quite rare.

[UPDATE] after the end: medieval studies, the humanities, and the post-catastrophe

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 4:51pm
Eileen A. Joy/The BABEL Working Group

This conference will bring together medievalists with scholars and theorists working in later periods in the humanities in order to collectively take up the broad question of what happens "after the end," by which we mean after the end of the affair, the end of the world, and everything in between. After gender, sex, love, the family, the nation-state, the body, the human, language, truth, feeling, reason, ethics, modernity, politics, religion, God, the nation-state, secularism, liberalism, the humanities, the university, teleology, progress, history, historicism, narrative, meaning, the individual, singularity, theory, practice, what else is there?

Physician/Pastor, Doctor/Divine: Intersections of Religion and Medicine, NeMLA Apr 7-10, 2011 [Abstracts due 9/30]

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 4:10pm
Ashley Reed and Kelly Bezio

From Cotton Mather's *The Angel of Bethesda* to the television drama *House, M.D.*, purveyors of American culture remain preoccupied with the intertwining roles of the physician and the pastor. Mather's assertion that illness is sin and medical cures can be found by cleansing the soul invokes related anxieties about medicine thwarting divine will. Nathaniel Hawthorne's stories of mad scientists and William Wells Brown's condemnation of medical experiments on enslaved Africans speak to the fear of medicine infringing on the dictates of the divine--a tension that continues today as medical dramas pit the "miracles" of Western medical therapeutics against the "wonders" of faith.

DEADLINE: June 20th -- Problematizing Religious Oratory Rhetoric in the Streets and the Pulpit

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 3:16pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association

This session seeks submissions that examine the relationships and intersections of rhetoric and religion. Topics include, but are not limited to investigating the rhetorical elements of homiletics; theology and logology; historical analysis of religious rhetoric development; methodology; religion, rhetoric and space; intersections of race, class and gender; language and practice; and controversies within the field. We are particularly interested in proposals that skirt or problematize traditional interpretations of religious oratory rhetoric.

The Rhetoric of Violence in the Early Modern Era, Deadline 30th November 2010

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Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 7:18am
Nathalie Rivere de Carles - Pascale Drouet

The Rhetoric of Violence in the Early Modern Era

We invite submissions for the 2011 issue of Cahiers Shakespeare en devenir-Shakespearean Afterlives. These might include essays (6000-7000 words including notes) for the issue proper, and review-essays (2-3000 words) or reviews of plays or exhibitions (1000-1500 words) for the issue's supplement L'Oeil du spectateur.

Collection CFP: Attached to Fiction: Trauma, Loss, Pleasure (4 October, 2010)

updated: 
Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 6:03am
Dr Hila Shachar and Dr Sophie Sunderland/English and Cultural Studies, University of Western Australia

Collection Call for Papers:

Attached to Fiction: Trauma, Loss, Pleasure

Editors: Dr Hila Shachar and Dr Sophie Sunderland, English and Cultural Studies, University of Western Australia

Contact email: attachedtofiction@gmail.com

"Mr Sakamoto said that reading had saved his life. Not mathematics. Not money. Not travel. Reading. At a time, he said, when he felt blasted by images, words had anchored him, secured him, stopped his free-falling plunge into nowhere."

-Gail Jones, Dreams of Speaking (London: Harvill Secker, 2006), p. 132.

Legal Fictions, NEMLA, April 7-10, 2011

updated: 
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 10:33pm
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association

The concept of a "legal fiction"—"a supposition avowedly false, but treated as if it were true, for the imagined convenience of administering the law" (Lewis, 1832)—describes the pretenses that disguise changes in the application of a legal rule. However, as its terminological indebtedness to the institution of fiction underscores, the concept also offers a suggestive rubric for understanding the nexus between law and literature—reminding us that law, as much as literature, is an unstable amalgam of fact and fiction. Examining the fictional elements of law, nonetheless, need not end only in textual ambiguity. The characterization of extant laws as mere fictions of the state has often been a strategy for political critique and legal reform.

Ecocriticism Sessions at NeMLA (4/7-11/11; 9/30/10)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 2, 2010 - 9:37pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

Call for Papers in Ecocriticism
at
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick
Host Institution: Rutgers University

Among the 370 Sessions accepting abstracts are the following looking for essays on ecocritical issues:

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