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Aesthetics, Politics, and Ethics in Fractured Times - 2017 ASPECT Graduate Conference

updated: 
Monday, December 5, 2016 - 1:58pm
The Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 15, 2016

***Extended Deadline: December 15, 2016***

Call for Papers

Aesthetics, Politics, and Ethics in Fractured Times

2017 ASPECT Graduate Conference - Friday, March 31st – Saturday, April 1st

The Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought

Location TBA

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA

www.aspect.vt.edu www.facebook.com/aspectvt aspect@vt.edu

 

[DEADLINE EXTENDED] Ecology/ies | February 24-25, 2017

updated: 
Friday, February 10, 2017 - 11:54am
Northeastern University English Graduate Student Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Ecology/ies

February 24-25, 2017

Northeastern University

 

Deadline extended: now February 15, 2017

 

Though scientifically dense and tethered to biology, ecology—particularly in its multiple, ecologies—is an area rich for discussion and interpretation. At its root, the word “ecology” comes from the Greek word oîkos, meaning “house.” At its most basic translation, “ecology” becomes “study of the house,” and is open for the complex questions about this space of living and interaction.

 

American Indian Workshop 2017 - The Art of Resistance and Resurgence

updated: 
Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 10:08am
American Indian Workshop
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 15, 2016

Proposals are invited for the thirty-eighth American Indian Workshop, to be held at Goldsmiths, University of London from July 4-6, 2017. Papers are welcome from all fields and on any topic, though priority will be given to those that speak to the conference’s key theme.

Mum's The Word: Voicing the Female Experience in Popular Culture

updated: 
Sunday, January 15, 2017 - 8:00am
Jade Dillon & Adele Hannon in association with Sibéal Feminist and Gender Studies Network
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Sorcha Gunne, NUI Galway. Dr Gunne's paper is entitled 'Gender, Genre and Modernity: Feminist Politics and Irish Chick Lit from a World-Literary Perspective'

 

Conference Details:

SCMLA 2017: "This power was forced upon me”: Social Transformation in the Marvel Universe

updated: 
Tuesday, January 3, 2017 - 3:11pm
Rebeccah Bechtold
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 30, 2017

This panel invites papers on representations of social transformation in the Marvel Universe to be presented at South Central MLA’s 2017 annual convention held October 5-8th in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Presenters should feel free to propose papers on a wide-range of topics. We are especially interested, however, in papers that explore the representation of trauma and/or violence as a necessary part of socially transformative practices. Proposed papers could consider, for instance, the trauma of Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D’s terrigenesis or how Luke Cage’s body—often riddled with bullets—offers a challenge to the “All Lives Matter” movement.

Making and Collecting - University of Virginia - April 7-9, 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, January 4, 2017 - 12:20pm
Graduate English Students Association, University of Virginia
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 20, 2017

**DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JANUARY 20, 2017**

 

Making and Collecting

April 7-9, 2017

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Keynote: Bill Brown (University of Chicago)

Lunchtime symposium hosted by Bill Brown and Cynthia Wall (University of Virginia)

Thorstein Veblen's The Higher Learning in America at 100 (MLA 2018)

updated: 
Monday, November 14, 2016 - 10:13am
Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 20, 2017

Thorstein Veblen's 1918 The Higher Learning in America: A Memorandum on the Conduct of Universities by Business Men presented one of the earliest anti-corporate critiques of university-industry relations. This panel will offer readings of his classic study in light of the changes in American universities over the twentieth century and into the twenty-first. What can we learn from Veblen's critique? Does his argument still hold up 100 years later, and, if so, how might we use it as a resource in our own struggles against austerity budgeting, labor casualization, and corporatization in our institutions?

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