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First CFP: THE ANATOMY OF MARGINALITY (A Special Issue of "The European Legacy" )‏

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 12:42pm
Costica Bradatan

(Please circulate widely & apologies for cross-postings!)

First Call for Papers: THE ANATOMY OF MARGINALITY

A Special Issue of "The European Legacy"

Guest Editors: COSTICA BRADATAN (The Honors College, Texas Tech University) & AURELIAN CRAIUTU (Department of Political Science, Indiana University, Bloomington)

"Ecocritical Activisms and Activist Ecologies" NeMLA 2011 April 6-10, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ: Abstracts Sept 30

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 12:21pm
42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

Ecocriticism informs ecological activisms, and vice versa. What kind of change can the intersections and tensions between ecocriticism and activism bring about? While ecocriticism has become an increasingly popular field of inquiry, its positionality remains an issue for negotiation. From Rachel Carson's Silent Spring (1962), which continues to influence mass eco-activisms, to the anti-GMO groups that shape discussions of bioethics, ecocriticism remains in dialogue with practical approaches in what Lawrence Buell has termed a "spirit of commitment to environmentalist praxis" (The Environmental Imagination, 1995). Moreover, current ecocritical scholarship underscores a general distrust of the romanticizing rhetoric of early ecocriticism.

Cinema and the Carnivalesque—2011 SCMS Panel in New Orleans (03/10-03/13)

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 12:07pm
Maggie Hennefeld / Brown University

The comedic and socially transgressive mode that Mikhail Bakhtin defines as "carnivalesque" primarily concerns literary forms of representation. This panel poses the question: what would it mean for the cinematic medium to be carnivalesque?

Bakhtin emphasizes the following key criteria for the carnivalesque: the replacement of order with chaos; temporary reversals of social hierarchies (crownings and decrownings); aesthetic defamiliarization through parodic or grotesque modes; and dialogical forms of communication that efface any dominant, authorial voice and that seek to negotiate more democratic relationships between "reader" and "text."

This panel welcomes papers that grapple with one or more of the following questions:

[UPDATE] short essays: literature, justice, law, teaching and social change June- August

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 11:22am
Changing Lives Through Literature

Changing Lives Through Literature is a nationally recognized alternative sentencing program for criminal offenders founded in 1991 on the power of literature to transform lives. CLTL sentences criminal offenders to a series of literature seminars instead of traditional probation. Studies have confirmed that program graduates are half as likely to commit additional crimes than their counterparts in the justice system.

BAD TASTE -- Thursday, October 21, 2010

updated: 
Monday, May 24, 2010 - 9:15am
22nd Annual Tufts University English Graduate Organization Conference

Keynote Address: Professor Martin Puchner, Harvard University

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE:
Bad Taste: we know it when we see it, and yet we do not always know what to do with it. Sometimes celebrated and sometimes repudiated, the forms, genres, images, and topics associated with the category of bad taste are always provocative.

In celebration of our conference's 22nd Anniversary, we are interested in investigating bad taste. We seek to explore the ways in which bad taste is identified and utilized. How does the category of taste create and reify genres? What role does taste play in a consumer society? If Bad Taste can evoke shame or pride, how do we evaluate or classify it in terms of affect?

Intention and Intentionality (NEMLA April 2011)

updated: 
Sunday, May 23, 2010 - 10:52pm
Josh Gang, Department of English, Rutgers Univ.

Sixty years after the publication of Wimsatt and Beardsley's 'The Intentional Fallacy,' the problem of intention continues to haunt literary criticism. Authorial intention exists--but as literary critics, we don't generally talk about it. Looking to recent work in the history of criticism, literary theory, philosophy, and the history of ideas, this panel asks why this is the case. The theoretical justifications for discounting authorial intention--whether from Wimsatt and Beardsley, Barthes, Foucault, or de Man--have slowly faded into history. But as a practice of criticism and as a practice of teaching literature, that attitude towards intention remains

Collection of essays on African Traditional Religions/African Diasporic Religious belief systems [UPDATE]

updated: 
Sunday, May 23, 2010 - 10:35pm
Cherie Ann Turpin and Anika Cazenave

Proposals are invited for an edited collection of scholarly essays and autobiographical essays on African Traditional Religions/African Diasporic Religious belief systems. The editors of this collection seek to explore the following questions: Who are ATR practitioners? How do they function in African Diasporic communities where Christianity and/or Islam religious practices are expected? Who is out of the "broom closet"? Should they be out of the "broom closet"? How do they define relationships, associations, and/or boundaries with other religious/cultural traditions—and where do boundaries become less certain? What are their intersections with other communities of faith or identity?

Cinema and the Carnivalesque—2011 SCMS Panel in New Orleans (03/10-03/13)

updated: 
Sunday, May 23, 2010 - 5:23pm
Maggie Hennefeld / Brown University

"Carnival is the place for working out, in a concretely sensuous, half-real and half-play-acted form, a new mode of interrelationship between individuals, counterposed to the all-powerful social-hierarchical relationships of everyday life" (Mikhail Bakhtin in Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics).

The comedic and socially transgressive mode that Mikhail Bakhtin defines as "carnivalesque" primarily concerns literary forms of representation. This panel poses the question: what would it mean for the cinematic medium to be carnivalesque?

"'What is bettre than gold?': Economies and Values in the Middle Ages"

updated: 
Sunday, May 23, 2010 - 2:00pm
Columbia University Medieval Guild

The Columbia University Medieval Guild is pleased to announce its 21st annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference, "'What is bettre than gold?': Economies and Values in the Middle Ages," taking place on 22 October 2010.

4th International Conference on Consciousness, Theatre, Literature and the Arts, Lincoln, UK, 28-30 May 2011

updated: 
Sunday, May 23, 2010 - 7:44am
Lincoln School of Performing Arts, University of Lincoln, UK

The Lincoln School of Performing Arts, University of Lincoln, UK, is pleased to host the Fourth International Conference on Consciousness, Theatre, Literature, and the Arts. The conference will be held in Lincoln, UK, from Saturday 28 to Monday 30 May 2011. Abstracts (up to 1 page) are invited for papers relating any aspect of consciousness (as defined in a range of disciplines involved with consciousness studies) to any aspect of theatre, performance, literature, music, fine arts, media arts and any sub-genre of those. We also welcome creative work! Please send the abstract to Professor Daniel Meyer-Dinkgräfe, dmeyerdinkgrafe@lincoln.ac.uk Deadline for receipt of abstracts is 1 March 2011

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