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Vernacular Practices across East Asia: The University of Chicago Graduate Student Conference 2016

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
The University of Chicago
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 15, 2016

Call for Papers:

 

Vernacular Practices across East Asia

The University of Chicago Graduate Student Conference 2016

Friday, October 7th through Sunday, October 9th

 

Keynote Speaker: Bao Weihong, Assistant Professor in the Chinese Program and Film Studies, University of California, Berkeley 

 

Special Event“Kagawa Ryo Live in Chicago,” a performance of Japanese folk music

 

Conference Description:

CFP - Apollon Undergraduate Humanities eJournal

updated: 
Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:10am
Apollon, Humanities' Only Hope
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 3, 2016

Apollona peer-reviewed undergraduate eJournal in the humanities, announces the call for papers for its seventh issue. The sixth issue is online with six peer-reviewed research contributions from undergraduate scholars across the US, and expanded features such as audio and video interviews, material and art history videos, and editorial pieces. Apollon invites college and university undergraduate students to help edit or get published in a new peer-reviewed digital humanities publication.

Student submissions deadline is July 01, 2016. Interested faculty should contact us with interest or inquiries as well. Go ahead -- you know you want to.

SEDITIOUS ATHEISM: AUTHORS PROSECUTED FOR DENYING PARADISE

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:31am
Anna Faktorovich, PhD/ SAMLA Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016

George IV fined Leigh Hunt, the Editor, £100 for publishing Lord Byron’s anonymous satire, “The Vision of Judgment,” in their new independent journal, “The Liberal,” about George III not exactly having gone to heaven in 1823. Earlier, on September 3, 1811, Byron wrote in a letter to Hodgson, a friend, “I will have nothing to do with your immortality; we are miserable enough in this life, without the absurdity of speculating upon another. If men are to live, why die at all? And if they die, why disturb the sweet and sound sleep that ‘knows no waking’?...

CFP: Film and the Suburbs - Collection (contracted)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:31am
Filmurbia: Cinema and the Suburbs
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Chapter Sought

The editors of a new book on cinema from the suburbs seek a chapter relating to film and architecture in the suburbs, or cinema and the industry of cinema in the suburbs, or a related topic.

This book is already contracted and due for completion in the next few months, so a chapter that is already written or draws from research already undertaken would be most likely, but all ideas are welcome

 

The Editors can be contacted at editors@suburbanfilm.net

 

 

Multilingualism and Multiculturalism in the United States: Cultural Fluency in the Global Era

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:31am
NeMLA 2017 Annual Convention, Baltimore, March 23-26, 2017 (Johns Hopkins University)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This session aims to further a scholarly debate on the reality of multilingualism and multiculturalism in the United States in the context of a globalized market led by the United States. The tragic events of 9/11 brought to the public discussion the United States’ inability to communicate with and comprehend other cultures and other languages. As a consequence, different initiatives emerged even at the Congressional level including legislative proposals to address the deficit in language and international expertise.

Interdisciplinary Humanities: The Sciences and the Humanities in Connection

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:31am
NeMLA 2017 Annual Convention, Baltimore, March 23-26, 2017 (Johns Hopkins University)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This session aims to gather scientists, people in the professions (Business, Social Work, etc), and scholars in the Humanities to discuss the value of a formation in the Humanities for their specific fields. The debate aims to explore how careers in the Humanities (Languages, Philosophy, Anthropology, Sociology, etc.) inform current trends and concrete needs in the sciences, and the professions.

 

Paper Title: 100 words max.

Paper Abstract: 300 words max.

Submit online: https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html  

 

Digital Minds: Latin(o) Americans in Cyberspace

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:31am
NeMLA 2017 Annual Convention, Baltimore, March 23-26, 2017 (Johns Hopkins University)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This session explores the emergent field of digital narratives with a focus on productions originated in Latin America; the panel will also analyze digital works produced by Latin@s in the United States. As the scholarship of élika Ortega, Scott Weintraub, Luis Correa-Díaz, Osvaldo Cleger, Carolina Gaínza, and Phillip Penix-Tadsen thoroughly demonstrate, Latin America is currently having an avant-garde role in the production of digital narratives in cyberspace. Interactive novels and poems, as well as online artistic platforms and the creation of video games count among the wide range of cultural artifacts produced in the region to be shared in cyberspace.

"The Female Body in the Public Realm: Territory for Political and Religious Wars"

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
NeMLA 2017 Annual Convention, Baltimore, March 23-26, 2017 (Johns Hopkins University)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

As globalization settles in across the planet, the female body continues to be the territory par excellence where political and religious wars resiliently take place. From the Balkan war, to the femicides of Ciudad Juárez and the women facially disfigured by acid throwing, the female body continues to be a threat in the public sphere. This panel explores scholarly ideas on feminist conceptualizations of the female body in the public realm in Spanish-speaking societies vis-à-vis the above-mentioned context.

Paper Title: 100 words max.

Paper Abstract: 300 words max.

Submit online: https://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html

The Ancient Novel in the Renaissance RSA 2017 Chicago

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 31, 2016

 Though many modern scholars place the invention of the novel in the 18th century, the genre arose much earlier. Early Modern works such as those by Sidney, Rabelais, and Cervantes may be classified as novels. However, the genre has its origins in the ancient Greek and Roman novels of the second and third centuries. While these works are often forgotten in the present day, they were translated during the Renaissance and were among the most widely read texts of the Early Modern period. Their popularity stemmed from their content and their structures, as they synthesized and examined several genres in a single prose work. As a result, echoes of the ancient novel are present in Renaissance romance, satire, poetry, and theatre.

“I do love these ancient ruins”-- Ruinophilia in Early Modern Literature and Culture / RSA 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 6:32am
Margaret Owens, Nipissing University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 28, 2016

 

Ruinophilia, Ruin Porn, Ruin Lust – the roots of post-modernity’s recent enthralment with ruins are often traced back to the eighteenth-century cult of the sublime. However, Antonio’s remark, “I do love these ancient ruins,” in John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi, suggests that versions of ruinophilia were very much alive in the early seventeenth century. This proposed panel for the Renaissance Society of America conference (30 March-1 April 2017 in Chicago) seeks papers that explore the fascination with ruins in sixteenth and seventeenth-century literary and cultural venues.  

 

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