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Old age and aging in British theatre and drama - An edited collection

Friday, October 2, 2015 - 3:36pm
dr Katarzyna Bronk

In contrast to the ongoing childhood studies, humanistic gerontology is still largely an unexplored research area, despite more and more attention being paid to old age by historians, sociologists and literary scholars. The latter have taken up the subject of aging and the elderly, trying to create something like an all-encompassing literary "meta-narrative old age" (Johnson and Thane, eds., Old age from antiquity to post-modernity, 17). Johnson and Thane suggest that this may be a fallacy and that one should rather focus on more contained historical and socio-cultural research areas when studying the processes and meaning of aging. This way, for instance, one can avoid interpretative mistakes attributed to Georges Minois.

Affective Ecocriticism

Friday, October 2, 2015 - 1:58pm
Jennifer Ladino / University of Idaho

Call for proposals: Affective Ecocriticism

Shakespeare's Italy (NeMLA 2016; abstract due Oct. 5)

Friday, October 2, 2015 - 1:43pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel seeks participants interested in exploring the complex and multi-faceted relationship between Shakespeare and Italy. Key areas of focus will be, among other things, the impact of the Italian Renaissance on England; early modern English translations of Italian works; Shakespeare's use of Italian texts for both direct source and indirect inspiration; Italian settings and characters in Shakespeare's plays; the influence of Italian genres, such as tragicomedy, in Shakespeare's drama; early modern English attitudes towards Italy in general and certain Italians (such as Machiavelli) in particular; and later Italian adaptations of Shakespeare, particularly for the opera and for the cinema.

Paris on Film (NeMLA 2016; abstract due Oct. 5)

Friday, October 2, 2015 - 1:41pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel seeks participants interested in exploring the many different ways that the City of Light has been captured in films from a variety of countries. With the possible exception of New York, no city has been used as a setting as frequently as a setting as has Paris. However, the French capital is unique in that it has been featured not only in French films but in films from around the world. This transnational element will be emphasized by the panel, a panel that seeks to explore the contradictions inherent in filming such a contradictory city. For example, how can a city be seen as both the birthplace of the modern while also being so frequently being filmed - particularly in terms of its bohemianism - in such a nostalgic light?

Object Emotions: Polemics

Friday, October 2, 2015 - 1:20pm
University of Cambridge

Object Emotions: Polemics
(April 15-16, 2016, Cambridge University)

Organizing Committee: Padma Maitland (UC Berkeley); Christopher P. Miller (UC Berkeley); Marta Figlerowicz (Yale U); Hunter Dukes (U Cambridge); Hannah Rose Woods (U Cambridge).

The Novel and Digital Humanities: Seeking Teaching Tools

Friday, October 2, 2015 - 12:48pm
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website

The editorial team at Studies in the Novel is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website. I am seeking pedagogical content that addresses teaching novels using digital humanities tools/perspectives. Please consider submitting sample course syllabi, specific assignments, short narrative descriptions of your own experiences, or other appropriate content. The next deadline for submission is October 26.

American Literature in the World Graduate Conference, Yale University, April 8, 2016

Friday, October 2, 2015 - 12:24pm
Yale University

The conference hopes to broaden the scope of American literature, opening it to more complex geographies, and to a variety of genres and media. The impetus comes partly from a survey of what is currently in the field: it is impossible to read the work of Junot Diaz and Edwidge Danticat, Robert Hass and Jorie Graham, Dave Eggers and Jhumpa Lahiri without seeing that, for all these authors, the reference frame is no longer simply the United States, but a larger, looser, more contextually varied set of coordinates, populated by laboring bodies, migrating faiths, generational sagas, memories of war, as well as the accents of unforgotten tongues, the taste and smell of beloved foods and spices.