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Papers in Human Studies

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:04pm
edits;
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 5, 2016

edits; believes in reaching the knowledge to most of the seekers. With this motto we are happy to launch two journals which would act as a platform from where ideas would emanate. Ideas are not effective till they reach too many heads, and keeping a knowledge restricted within the pay walls is nothing less than an epistemic violence. So our publications are open access and will certainly remain so.

Failure: A One-Day Symposium at the University of Sussex

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:04pm
Excursions Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 14, 2016

Call For Conference Papers:

 

Failure

 

A One-Day Symposium

 

Sussex University

 

September 28, 2016

 

Deadline for Abstracts: August 14, 2016

‘A real failure does not need an excuse. It is an end in itself.’

- Gertrude Stein, Four in America

 

‘Under certain circumstances failing, losing, forgetting, unmaking, undoing, unbecoming, not knowing may in fact offer more creative, more cooperative, more surprising ways of being in the world.’

- Jack Halberstam, The Queer Art of Failure

 

A Great Divide or a Longer Nineteenth Century? Music, Britain and the First World War

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:04pm
Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies, Durham University UK
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies One-Day Conference
21 January 2017
Durham University, UK
CFP Deadline: 1 September 2016

Conference website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/cncs/conferences/musicbritainww1/

Keynote Address
‘Disruption or Continuity? Elgar’s Cello Concerto and the Modern Romantic Ideal’
Charles Edward McGuire (Oberlin College)

Call for Papers

Ambivalent Affect: Perpetration in Contemporary Representations of the Holocaust

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:05pm
ACLA (Utrecht, July 6-9)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 23, 2016

In recent discourse on the ethical stakes of aesthetic representations of the Holocaust, the function of perpetrator figures has taken on a prominent role.  Moreover, recent literary texts, films and artworks about the Holocaust have focused prominently on perpetrator figures.

American Literature and Film of the Wars on Terror (Roundtable)

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:05pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Narrative has always had the power to help people feel and, one hopes, ultimately understand important personal and historic events. Representations of war in literature and film are important tools in understanding and creating a social memory of it. This roundtable welcomes papers that explore American literature and film that grapple with the war on terror. Please send 250-word abstracts to the NeMLA CFP website.

MFS Special Issue - Modernist Fictions of Disability

updated: 
Friday, July 15, 2016 - 3:05pm
Modern Fiction Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

Modernist Fictions of Disability

Guest Editor: Maren Linett
Deadline for Submissions: 1 December 2017 

George Orwell Today

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:49am
Firas A J Al-Jubouri/ American University of Sharjah
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 8, 2016

This is a CFP on George Orwell, preferably on his dystopian themes and/or writing style. I am editing a collection of critical essays to be proposed for Routledge publishing. The book will be divided into chapters and the project requires at least 7 different contributors.

"& ev’n wrongs / Sharpen their Muse": Misreadings, Miswritings, and Mis-takings

updated: 
Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 10:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

 

Turning to the artistically fruitful “wrong” of unrequited love as imagined by George Herbert, Seamus Heaney redresses the utter capriciousness of the art: “I want to profess the surprise of poetry as well as its reliability; I want to celebrate its given, unforeseeable thereness, the way it enters our field of vision and animates our physical and intelligent being….” Poets and writers, artists and musicians have all celebrated the error as evoking the unforeseen possibilities of their craft. (One might be reminded of Elizabeth Bishop’s “Man-Moth.”) Why ought the reader be excluded from the joy, the new knowledges, and the potential political subversiveness of the mistaken reading?

 

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