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REMINDER: The Fine Art of Commenting on Books that Don’t Exist: A Borgesian Experiment

updated: 
Wednesday, August 3, 2016 - 1:54pm
NeMLA - Baltimore, MD, March 23-26 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Borges once cheekily wrote, “Writing long books is a laborious and impoverishing act of foolishness…A better procedure is to pretend that those books already exist and to offer …a commentary.” Indeed authors as varied as Borges, Lovecraft, Dick, Apollinaire, Lew, and Asimov placed completely fictional books at the center of their own literary universes. That would make a fascinating panel, but that is not this panel. Rather, what this panel seeks are academic-style works of literary theory and criticism which take as their primary texts completely fictional novels, stories, movements, authors, and films.

Designing (Post)Colonial Knowledge: Imagining South Asia

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:26pm
South Asian Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 7, 2016

In Saloni Mathur’s 2007 book, India by Design: Colonial History and Cultural Display, she analyzes sites of artistic and cultural productions and institutions as they represent Indian design within colonial power structures. Reading sites as varied as museums and colonial postcards contrapuntally, Mathur proposes that the arts’, crafts, and aesthetics were significant not only in a conscious effort to control the visual display of culture and as a set of aesthetic traditions, but also how they signfied dynamic shifts in imperial contacts. Work by scholars such as Mathur, Karen Fiss, S.

AAIS-CSIS 2017 Roundtable CFP: Innovative Approaches to Teaching Italian

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:26pm
Brandon Essary (Elon University); Andrea Privitera (University of Western Ontario, Università di Padova)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016

Based on its success at the 2016 AAIS conference, this roundtable will seek to explore again innovative approaches to teaching Italian language, history, culture, or literature. Of particular – but not exclusive – interest are methods that utilize digital resources (video games, websites, computer programs). What resources and genres make the most effective teaching tools? Can interactivity with technology influence the way students learn? Which linguistic, cultural and literary concepts can best be illustrated?

Please submit presentation proposals (in Italian or English) of no more than 250 words and a brief biographical blurb to:

Diasporic Cinema: Multigenerational Narratives, Migration, and Identity in Asian America

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:26pm
Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

The Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival (PAAFF) is seeking proposals for papers and  

presentations on the theme of “Multigenerational Narratives, Migration, and Identity.” This  

inaugural conference will be held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from November 14–15, 2016 in  

conjunction with PAAFF 2016, the largest Asian American & Pacific Islander film festival on the  

East Coast.  

   

We seek proposals from scholars across a variety of fields such as Asian Studies, Asian  

American Studies, Cinema and Media Studies, and Visual Art and Culture Studies. Proposals  

Metal, Extreme Music and the Holocaust

updated: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 5:53am
University of Leeds
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 2, 2016

Call for Papers: Metal, Extreme Music and the Holocaust EXTENDED DEADLINE: 2 OCTOBER
University of Leeds 12 December 2016

Speakers:
Dr Matthew Boswell, University of Leeds, author of Holocaust Impiety
Dr Keith Kahn-Harris, author of Extreme Metal: Music and Culture on the Edge
Dr Nicholas Terry, University of Exeter, Holocaust historian and ex-editor of Terrorizer

Austerity Gardens: Extended Deadline

updated: 
Friday, October 7, 2016 - 12:52am
Naomi Milthorpe/ University of Tasmania
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Austerity Gardens

 

Edited by Dr Naomi Milthorpe, University of Tasmania

EXTENDED DEADLINE: Abstract and author bio due December 21, 2016

 

For queries or to submit a proposal, please contact the editor at Naomi.Milthorpe@utas.edu.au

The editor seeks 500-word proposals for submission to an edited collection devoted to the politics and poetics of austerity gardening in literary and material cultures in the Anglophone world from the Second World War onwards.

Theater and Law across Cultures and Frontiers

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:27pm
Samantha M. McDermitt The Law Theater Project
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Since the times of Ancient Greece, when “society” and “the State” were subsumed into and joined in the term, “polis,” Theater and Law/Ethics have interacted and relied on each other. 

 In Greece, drama tended to serve socio-political, cultural,religious, and other functions. It was a device for presenting and addressing serious and important public ethical, religious, and political issues, thereby building citizenship and engagement of the artists with public leaders and members of the public, in works by Aristophanes, Euripides, Sophocles, and Aeschylus. 

Other Spaces: Gender and Architecture in the Imagination, International Medieval Congress at Leeds

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2016 - 2:27pm
Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

Recent scholarship has drawn attention to the significant roles played by medieval women as patrons of architecture and to the ways in which gender informed the design and function of architectural sites. But what about representations of women and architecture in the medieval imagination? How do visual materials such as manuscript illuminations, paintings and tapestries, and literary works, such as dream visions, conceptualize the relationship between women and architectural space? To what degree are gender and architecture mutually constituted? What conclusions can we draw about spaces considered feminine, and how do these spaces renegotiate the divisions between private and public?

International Hoccleve Society at Kalamazoo 2017: Teaching Hoccleve (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Friday, September 9, 2016 - 11:14pm
International Hoccleve Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

There is a subtle irony in the fact that Thomas Hoccleve, whose corpus of early fifteenth-century poems is saturated with the concepts of recovery and rehabilitation, has been at the center of a decades-long process of poetic and pedagogic rehabilitation in university English departments. No longer brushed aside as a mere epigone of Geoffrey Chaucer, the traditional nucleus of Medieval English literature syllabi, Hoccleve now claims a legitimate place in the late medieval canon.  But what is that place exactly, as far as college classrooms go?

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