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[UPDATE] Cosmopolis and Beyond. Literary Cosmopolitanism after the Republic of Letters. (Trinity college, Oxford, 18-19 March)

updated: 
Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 2:04pm
University of Oxford

Cosmopolitanism, derived from the ancient Greek for 'world citizenship', offers a radical alternative to nationalism, asking individuals to imagine themselves as part of a community that goes beyond national and linguistic boundaries. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in cosmopolitanism in the humanities and social sciences, especially within philosophy, sociology and politics. Cosmopolitanism, however, has also exercised a shaping influence on modern literary culture. It is well known that during the Enlightenment it found an embodiment in the Republic of Letters.

College English Association--Middle Atlantic Group Conference 2016

updated: 
Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 10:25am
College English Association--Middle Atlantic Group

College English Association - Middle Atlantic Group
ANNUAL SPRING CONFERENCE 2016
Call for Papers
"Cultivation"
5 March 2016
Keynote Panel:
"Cultivating the English Major in the Digital Age"
Panelists: Chris Cain (Towson); Horacio Sierra (Bowie State);
Shirley Wilson Logan (UMD); Laura Yoo (Howard CC)

Location: Montgomery College, Rockville Campus

Crossings & Intersections

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 9:30pm
Comparative Studies Student Association (CSSA) at Florida Atlantic University

CROSSINGS & INTERSECTIONS

CSSA at FAU ANNUAL CONFERENCE
April 8-9, 2016
Boca Raton, FL

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JANUARY 15, 2016
EMAIL: FAUCSSAConference@gmail.com
WEB: FAU.edu/comparativestudies

The Comparative Studies Student Association (CSSA) at Florida Atlantic University invites academic submissions for the April 8-9, 2016 CSSA conference in Boca Raton, FL.

The Future of Human(ity) 22-24 July 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 9:09pm
CICAS: Center for Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Arts and Sciences

CICAS, the Center for Interdisciplinary Collaboration in the Arts and Sciences, invites proposals for its inaugural conference on the theme of The Future of Humanity. In a world where, on the one hand, we are informed that the planet cannot support a human life worth living a century from now and, on the other, that the first human to live to be 1000 years old may have already been born, no topic is more urgent for humans to debate through the lenses of their different disciplines. What is the future of the human species? What does it mean to be "human"? Or, as Richard Grusin (2015) suggests in The Nonhuman Turn, are we experiencing a different kind of "humanity" in the twenty-first century?

[UPDATE] Habitats and Hazards (11/30/15;2/19/16)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 5:39pm
Natures 2016: an interdisciplinary environmental humanities conference

Our theme invites exploration of the habitats and/or hazards of any aspect of humanities studies. Papers may explore the conference theme as applied to the texts of humanities studies (e.g. the hazardous spaces of "Jane Eyre"), or the various crises that threaten the material world now or in the past (e.g. popular culture depictions of pollution). Presenters are invited to (re)frame the terms of the theme in ways relevant to their projects.
Topics may include, but are not limited to:
•Close readings of texts (written, physical, and/or visual), from any period
•Domesticity, urbanity, public/private, setting in literature, history, art, and popular culture
•Pollution, scarcity, competition over resources

Technoloogy in the Classroom -- Good, Bad, and Ugly Opportunities and Issues in Student Engagement

updated: 
Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 11:23am
The Atrium: A Journal of Academic Voices

Share Your Best Practices with Colleagues Throughout the Disciplines and Around the World

Our focus for the Spring 2016 issue:
Technology in the Classroom – Good, Bad, and Ugly Opportunities and Issues in Engagement

Do your students see you as Charlie Brown saw his teacher: a voice incessantly mumbling "Wah, wah, wah..." in front of the classroom? Do they ask ask "what'd I miss?" after spending more time Twittering than attending to their coursework? How has technology changed student engagement at your campus?

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