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Wilde on the Borders: Conference, Theatre, and Art, April 2, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 3:27pm
English Department, Niagara University, NY

On February 8, 1882, after his seventh lecture in America in just over a week, Oscar Wilde traveled north from Buffalo, NY crossing the border by train to Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada to play the role of tourist. In typical Wilde fashion, his response to seeing the falls was paradoxical, proclaiming it "one of the earliest, if not the keenest, disappointments" of a bride's married life, yet appreciating its aesthetic and spiritual power as "a sort of embodiment of pantheism." Wilde's visit to Niagara Falls is both microcosm and metaphor for all of what might be called Wilde's 'border crossings'—national, classed, sexual, religious, and aesthetic.

CFP: Fools on the Medieval Page and Stage, Kalamazoo 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 11:24am
International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 12–15, 2016

Near the end of the Middle English romance Robert of Cisyle, the eponymous king—who has been punished for his pride by being made to serve as his own court's fool—acknowledges the error of his former ways: "For he ys a fole [. . .] / That turneth hys wytt unto folye" (CUL Ff. 2. 38, ll. 398–9). Such condemnations of fools and folly—in Robert of Cisyle, underwritten by the pope and an angel—in no way served to stem the tide of medieval interest in fools and folly. Literary evidence shows that many premodern writers and their audiences "turn[ed their] wytt vn to folye": fools filled the medieval stage and page, pervading multiple literary genres.

The (Native) American University

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:16am
NeMLA 2016 (March 17 - 20, 2016)

The colonial appropriation of indigenous place names has been an abiding concern of postcolonial studies. The severing of names from their semantic, grammatical, and linguistic ties within the native language and their re-contextualization within the language of the settler creates, in a variety of ways for both colonizer and colonized, a gap between the experience and meaning of a place and the name used to describe it, complicating the colonial boundary.

Interdisciplinary Research Methods What? Why? How? Who?

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:08am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Interdisciplinary Research Methods
What? Why? How? Who?

Call for Submissions 2016
Sunday 20th March – Tuesday 22nd March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

Interdisciplinarity: What, Why, How and Who?
IDN was established in 1999 with one aim: to reinvigorate interdisciplinary dialogue. After several successful years of fostering interdisciplinarity through the organization of conferences and research projects, IDN is now turning its attention and experience to another aspect of the same work: exploring the nuts and bolts of the processes of interdisciplinarity.

Interdisciplinary Research Methods What? Why? How? Who?

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 10:04am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Interdisciplinary Research Methods
What? Why? How? Who?

Call for Submissions 2016
Sunday 20th March – Tuesday 22nd March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

Interdisciplinarity: What, Why, How and Who?
IDN was established in 1999 with one aim: to reinvigorate interdisciplinary dialogue. After several successful years of fostering interdisciplinarity through the organization of conferences and research projects, IDN is now turning its attention and experience to another aspect of the same work: exploring the nuts and bolts of the processes of interdisciplinarity.

Torture

updated: 
Wednesday, September 2, 2015 - 8:23am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Torture
Call for Submissions 2016

Sunday 20th March – Tuesday 22nd March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

Digital America Issue no. 6 | Now Accepting Submissions

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:31pm
Digital America: an online journal on digital culture and American life

Digital America is now accepting submissions for Issue No. 6. We are looking for critical essays, film, artwork, design, reviews, and process pieces that question, analyze, and/or hack the tools of digital culture. We are also interested in work that explores how new behaviors and new, global networks of power and influence are shaping American life. All submissions should engage American life and digital culture and/or digitization in some way. We encourage creative responses to these parameters as we understand the complexities of engaging "America" in a global, networked world.

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

Once Upon a Mother --ASECS--March 31-April 3

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:14pm
Kelli Wilhelm / ASECS,

Call for Papers 47th ASECS Annual Meeting and the Eighteenth-Century Scottish Studies Society Pittsburgh, PA March 31-April 3, 2016

Proposals for papers should be sent directly to the seminar chairs no later than 15 September 2015. Please include your telephone and fax numbers and e-mail address. You should also let the session chair know of any audio-visual needs and special scheduling requests. We actively encourage presentations by younger and untenured scholars.

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