Subscribe to RSS - interdisciplinary

interdisciplinary

Beowulf to Shakespeare Area

updated: 
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 - 11:31am
Mid-Atlantic Popular American Culture Association (MAPACA), November 3-5, Atlantic City, NJ
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 7, 2016

The Medieval/Renassiance area of MAPACA ("Beowulf to Shakespeare") seeks papers concerning the use of medieval and Renaissance materials in modern productions.  Topics include, but are not limited to, the incorporation of medieval or Renaissance elements in modern artistic productions such as films, t.v. series, novels and music; the creation of medieval and Renaissance "themed" festivals, restaurants, etc., and the use of medieval or Renaissance elements in video games.   The area also seeks panelists interested in presenting on the ways in which contemporary theories and pedagogies influence our perceptions of these eras.

Law and Literature from the Global South - DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Monday, December 12, 2016 - 11:48am
The Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 15, 2017

The Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies

Spring 2018 Special Issue: Law and Literature from the Global South

Guest Editors: David Babcock (James Madison University) and Peter Leman (Brigham Young University)

 

Deadline for Submissions (approximately 4,000-5,000 words): DEADLINE UPDATED: January 15, 2017

Website: jcpcsonline.com

Contact Email: jcpcs.lawlit@gmail.com

Film & Media Festivals SIG – CfP for SCMS 2017 in Chicago

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:50am
SCMS Film & Media Festivals scholarly interest group
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 1, 2016

Film & Media Festivals SIG – CfP for SCMS 2017 in Chicago

To participate in a preconstituted panel sponsored by the Film and Media Festivals SIG, please submit a summary no longer than 2500 characters, 3-5 bibliographic sources, and an author bio no longer than 500 characters. 

Please copy and paste your proposal into the body of the email message (and avoid sending attachments!) and include in the subject heading “Film Festival SCMS paper (or workshop) submission.”

Human Rights Discourse in Antebellum America

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:50am
NeMLA 2017, Baltimore, March 23-26
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

This panel will explore the presence of eighteenth-century human rights discourse in antebellum American culture. We will have two goals: first, to seek persistences of eighteenth-century human rights theory even as it was eclipsed by discourses of Nationalism, European Imperialism, Anglo-Saxonism, scientific racism, economic determinism, and so on in the nineteenth century; second, to articulate the relationship of Enlightenment cosmopolitanism to the forces that would stifle it during the period between the American/French Revolutions and the post-WWII resurgence of human rights.

 

Gendered Innovations in the Social Sciences

updated: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 11:51am
Barbara Clare
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 21, 2016

'Gendered Innovations in the Social Sciences'

7-9 November 2016, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

What impact does women's limited presence in key fields of research have upon our capacity to grapple with social and political change? And if gender is ignored as an analytic category, can the social sciences make a meaningful contribution to understanding or resolving issues of gender inequality in society? 

Premodern Futurities: Speculative Objects and Prognostication in the Medieval World (Kalamazoo 2017)

updated: 
Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 3:12pm
Carly Boxer, Jack Dragu, and Luke Fidler
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 9, 2016

Interpreting the medieval arts entails setting in motion forms of anachronism; within the arts we see complex negotiations of temporality, which themselves pose significant challenges to our understanding of historical objects. Scholars have been both resistant to and complicit in these forms, a challenge of historicism having been, to a greater or lesser extent, to unlearn certain histories in order to “restore” the contingency of a specific historical moment. For, indeed, medieval people theorized futures of their own. They refined procedures of prognostication and speculation, and, significantly, crafted aesthetic objects that imagined divergent futurities.

Pages