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Deadline extended to Nov. 1st for special sessions for the Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:55am
Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought

The deadline for Special Sessions has been extended to November 1st for the Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought. Send all proposals for a special session to the conference director, Dr. Darci Hill at
dr.darci.hill@gmail.com.

We invite 250-word proposals on all aspects of medieval and renaissance culture and thought from all disciplines. Equally welcome are proposals/abstracts on music, art, architecture, literature, linguistics, history, religion, philosophy, theater, and dance.

Cheers!
Dr. Darci Hill

dr.darci.hill@gmail.com
936-294-1473

Special Session: Creative Writing inspired by All Things Medieval DL: Nov 1st

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:30am
Second International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Thought

Abstracts are invited for creative writing related to the medieval period. Please submit your 250- to 300-word proposal for your short story, poem, or novel excerpt set during the Middle Ages or addressing topics unique to the medieval period, including contemporary works inspired in some way by medieval ideas. Attach to your abstract a 100-word excerpt of your proposed creative work.

Deadline for proposals: Nov. 1, 2015.
Send proposals and excerpts for this special session on creative writing to the Conference Director, Dr. Darci Hill, or to the Special Session Coordinator, Reina Shay Broussard. Notifications of acceptance will be delivered by December 15, 2015.

CFP [UPDATE] - Visionary Texts, Past and Present: (Re)visionings and (Re)imaginings

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:26am
Pivot: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies and Thought

"The visionary starts with a clean sheet of paper, and reimagines the world." — Malcolm Gladwell

"It's a very salutary thing to realize that the rather dull universe in which most of us spend most of our time is not the only universe there is." — Aldous Huxley

Philosophers, poets, and artists in every era have revisioned and reimagined the world in ways that have inspired historical transformations. Visionary texts – whether they reach proleptically into an imagined future, analeptically reconsider the past, or urgently re-envision the present – have offered us alternative possibilities of understanding who and where we are.

Papers on Language and Literature: Call for Special Issue Proposals

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:10am
PLL: Papers on Language and Literature

Papers on Language and Literature is seeking proposals for special issues on subjects including but not limited to

Digital Humanities

Film

Literary Translation

Print Culture

PLL is a generalist publication that is committed to publishing work on a variety of literatures, languages, and chronological periods. We accept proposals year-round. We are a quarterly and expect to publish a special issue once a year, every year. The specific volume and issue will be determined later, depending on the editors' schedule.

On the Footsteps of Dwarves: Different Readings of a Mythical Figure in Popular Culture (15.10.2015) [REMINDER]

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 7:47am
Dr. Feryal Cubukcu, Dr. Sabine Planka

Today more than ever fairy tales permeate pop culture, literature,
music, fine arts, opera, ballet and cinema. Speaking of the history of
stories and especially fairy-tales, we may say that the Pot of Soup, the
Cauldron of Story, has always been boiling for centuries. Dwarves have
always been a recurring image and a character from the fairy tales to
the novels.
Mythology itself presents dwarves not only as treasurekeepers and
remarkable workers, but calling them gnome, kobold, bogey, brownie or
leprechaun. Zealous, sharp and small in statue they are often shown as
counterparts to the inane giant. The possible dualistic arrangement

ACLA 2016: The Poetics of Reflexivity: Image, Text, and the Reflexive Gesture

updated: 
Sunday, September 20, 2015 - 7:01pm
Phillip Griffith and Avra Spector, Graduate Center, CUNY

This seminar uses the concept of reflexivity to explore interdisciplinary questions about the relationship of a self to the world by investigating various points along the reflexive route. The reflexive act, following a path similar to a boomerang's, moves away from a subject only to return as it traces a recoiling -- a turning, deflecting, or bending back. We ask: what is revealed when different points along this trajectory are represented in language or image? We are interested in reflexivity not only as a completed loop but in its disruptions, fragmentations, blockages, and failed journeys. How does marking the reflexive act at a particular point in its path dictate a set of terms for the relationship of a self to the world?

Innovative Representations of 'Utopias' in Studies in English

updated: 
Sunday, September 20, 2015 - 2:50pm
International Graduate Conference: Innovative Representations of ‘Utopias’ in Studies in English

The Centre for British Literary and Cultural Studies at Hacettepe University is pleased to announce its second graduate conference which this time will be held on an international ground, "Innovative Representations of 'Utopias' in Studies in English". We welcome academic proposals produced in English on British Literature/Culture, Commonwealth Literature/Culture, Irish Literature/Culture and American Literature/Culture from MA and PhD students enrolled in graduate programmes all over the world.

[UPDATE] NEMLA 2016 Panel Still Laughing: Ancient Comedy and Its Descendants Due 9/30

updated: 
Sunday, September 20, 2015 - 1:46pm
Claire Sommers (the Graduate Center, CUNY) and Barry Spence (University of Massachusetts)

Aristotle in his Poetics outlines his theory of tragedy and gives readers a framework for assessing and understanding the genre; his treatise providing the equivalent analysis of comedy has sadly been lost, and as a result, it is difficult to find a unified theory of ancient comedy. Perhaps the closest we have is Democritus' statement that "Laughter is a complete conception of the world." Centuries later, Bakhtin would elaborate upon this sentiment by claiming that the carnivalesque comedy allows for dialogue between multiple genres and voices in order to create a world in which societal structures are upended.

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