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[Update] Reconstruction 17.2: Fantasy Sports

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 8:28am
Andrew J. Ploeg / Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture

Fantasy sports are one of the most popular and rapidly expanding areas of contemporary culture. Despite the immense interest in them, however, fantasy sports remain an insufficiently mined scholarly resource. While studies on the topic have been published over the past fifteen years, they have focused almost exclusively on issues of law (e.g., Are fantasy sports a form of gambling?), economics (e.g., Who should profit from sports statistics?), and sports management (e.g., Who plays fantasy sports and why?). We contend that this limited approach has contributed to fantasy sports research being considered a minor scholarly niche, rather than a diverse subject area rife with its own unique cultural insights.

Bloomsbury C21 Conference 2016: Writing and Insecurity

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 6:40am
C21 Writings, University of Brighton

Writing and Insecurity: Writing the Twenty-first Century

Organised in partnership with Bloomsbury Publishing

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

Confirmed Keynotes:
Dr. Arne De Boever (California Institute of the Arts) and Dr. Katy Shaw (Leeds Beckett)

In the impasse induced by crisis, being treads water; mainly, it does not drown. Even those whom you would think of as defeated are living beings figuring out how to stay attached to life from within it, and to protect what optimism they have for that, at least.
Lauren Berlant Cruel Optimism

Cinemania: Madness and the Moving Image, February 19-20, deadline DEC. 15

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 2:37am
Anna Shechtman / Yale University

Cinemania: Madness and the Moving Image

Film and Media Studies Graduate Student Conference
Yale University
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: W. J. T. Mitchell, Gaylord Donnelley Distinguished Serve Professor of English and Art History, University of Chicago

Closing Remarks: Francesco Casetti, Thomas E. Donnelley Professor of Humanities and Film and Media Studies, Yale University

PROPOSALS DUE FRIDAY, DEC 4, 2015: Play's the Thing: Phenomenology and Play in Early Modern Literature, 1500-1800

updated: 
Monday, November 30, 2015 - 2:04pm
Early Modern Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Play's the Thing: Phenomenology and Play in Early Modern Literature, 1500-1800
University of California, Santa Barbara
Conference Date: March 4-5, 2016
Proposal Due Date: December 4, 2015

The Early Modern Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites proposals for our annual conference, "Play's the Thing: Phenomenology and Play in Early Modern Literature, 1500-1800," to be held on March 4 and 5, 2016. We are happy to announce our three keynote speakers: Laura Engel (Duquesne University), James A. Knapp (Loyola University Chicago), and Bruce Smith (University of Southern California).

SCSC 2016: Bruges (18-20 August)

updated: 
Monday, November 30, 2015 - 12:50pm
Sixteenth Century Society and Conference

The Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC) is now accepting proposals for individual presentation proposals and complete panels for its 2016 annual conference, to be held 18-20 August 2016 at Martins Hotel, the Crowne Plaza Hotel, and the Provinciaal Hof in Bruges, Belgium. The deadline for proposals is February 15, 2016. Within four weeks after the deadline, the Program Committee will notify all those who submitted proposals.

"Narrative, Description, and Spatiality"-Call for Panelists-Narrative 2016 conference

updated: 
Monday, November 30, 2015 - 12:01pm
David Rodriguez-Stony Brook University / Marlene Marcussen-University of Southern Denmark

We seek to organize a panel at the Narrative 2016 conference in Amsterdam 16-18 June around innovative papers that engage with the different ways space, environment, and nature are both represented and perceived in literature through the experience of reading.Focus on description has recently received a wide range of methodological approaches by narratologists. For example, Monika Fludernik is developing an interesting disentanglement of the "description / narration" binary through an updated linguistic model, and Melba Cuddy-Keane integrates second-generation cognitive science to put dynamic, navigational action into the way we think about mental images in description.

'With their skins on them, and ... their souls in them': Towards a Vegan Theory. 31st May 2016

updated: 
Monday, November 30, 2015 - 10:29am
The University of Oxford

Building on the increasing prominence of the 'animal turn' in the humanities in the last decade, and the recent publication of Laura Wright's 'The Vegan Studies Project: Food, Animals, and Gender in an Age of Terror' (University of Georgia Press, 2015), this conference we will seek to ask what kind of place veganism and/or 'the vegan' should occupy in our theorizations of human-animal relations, animal studies, and the humanities in general. An increasing number of individuals, particularly in the West, are now identifying as vegan, but the heterogeneity of reasons for doing so – animal suffering, the environment, health, anti-capitalism – suggests a broad, complex, and fertile place from which to rethink ways of being in the world.

Producing Public Arts and Humanities

updated: 
Monday, November 30, 2015 - 10:21am
Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory

In 1845, Rudolphe Töpffer published an essay about the aesthetic, rhetorical, and philosophical foundations of literature in prints (graphic novels) with a desire of making academic, intellectual, and scholarly works accessible to the public, advocating for an ethic of collective action and the common good—via critiques of social, cultural, and political issues of the day through amateur art. At the time, the most promising mode of composing such critiques was through figure drawing and distributing them using the then-recent emergence of lithographic printing technologies. More recently, Gregory L.

[Reminder] Boundaries and Intersections: Space, Time, Discipline (MadLit) – Proposals by 12/18/15; Conference 2/25/16-2/27/16

updated: 
Monday, November 30, 2015 - 10:20am
UW-Madison MadLit Graduate Student Conference

Boundaries and intersections -- two contrasting metaphors and yet not quite a binary. On the one hand, these words spatially remind us of Venn diagrams: two bound circles with a space of intersection where they overlap. On the other hand, intersections can be places of traffic, movement over time, streams of cars or pedestrians crossing boundaries. Spatial overlap or temporal crossing--the stability of categories or their rupture. The humanities are constantly defined and redefined by the churning of boundaries and intersections.

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