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Pre-Modernisms

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:13am
Pearl Kibre Medieval Study
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 15, 2016

Pre-Modernisms: Friday, October 28th, The Graduate Center, CUNY

12th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference

Fourteenth Annual Graduate Conference at the Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

updated: 
Monday, June 20, 2016 - 9:13am
Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 4, 2016

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst will host its fourteenth annual graduate student conference on Saturday, October 1st, 2016. We are delighted to welcome Diana Henderson of MIT as our keynote speaker.

 

Baltimore and the Emergence of the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 3:31pm
Lena Ampadu/Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Baltimore, Maryland, has been the home of several important African American authors, including Frederick Douglass and Frances E. W. Harper.  In addition to these major writers who influenced the emergence of African American protest literature of the tumultuous nineteenth century, there are several other significant writers of prose and poetry who have lived in the city and created African American literature. Notable examples include Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Waters Turpin, Eugenia Collier, and Lucille Clifton.

Comics Forum 2016 - Genre: A Conference on Comics

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 9:46am
Comics Forum
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 25, 2016

Comics Forum 2016 – Call For Papers

Genre: A Conference on Comics

Leeds Central Library, Leeds (UK), 3rd – 4th November 2016

 

Confirmed keynote speaker: Hermann (winner at Angoulême 2016, and creator of Jeremiah, Comanche, The Towers of Bois-Maury, amongst others).

Call for Local Stories

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 9:46am
Center for Locality and Humanities of Korean Studies Institute at Pusan National University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

Call for Local Stories

 

Figuring the Work of Maintenence

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 9:46am
Northeast Modern Language Association - March 23-26, 2017 - Baltimore, MD
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The interrogation of wide-ranging labor and political-economic issues has long provided cultural and literary studies with a foundational motive. Not much has been said about maintenance—at least not directly. Against modernity’s celebration of progress, development and productivity, and against neoliberal incantations of innovation and creative destruction, attending to maintenance reveals a devalorized and oft-hidden form of labor, one on which productivity happens to depend. And, against that most fundamental drive in all forms of capitalism—growth—maintenance may offer a workable alternative.

"Site Specificity Without Borders" -- Special Issue of ASAP/Journal

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 9:46am
Matthew Hart, Columbia University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

CFP: ASAP/Journal Special Issue

 

“Site Specificity Without Borders”

Deadline 1 September 2016

 

Guest Co-Editors

 

David J. Alworth

Department of English

Harvard University

617-496-4904 

alworth@fas.harvard.edu

 

Matthew Hart

Department of English & Comparative Literature

Columbia University

212-854-6407

mh2968@columbia.edu

 

Call for Papers

 

CfP: FORUM Issue 23, Readers and Writers

updated: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016 - 9:47am
FORUM University of Edinburgh Postgraduate Journal of Culture & The Arts
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 12, 2016

From the earliest traces of etchings on stone tablets to the emergence of Kindles and e-readers in contemporary society, humans have invented platforms for the creation and dissemination of text. Implicit in each textual object are the figures of the reader and writer and their differing engagement with the work. But what does it mean to be a reader or a writer, and how does each role play a part in the shaping of a text? 

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