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The Reception of Geoffrey of Monmouth in Medieval and Early Modern Britain, ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 5:53am
Victoria Shirley, Cardiff University

Geoffrey of Monmouth's 'Historia regum Britanniae' was one of the most popular versions of insular 'British' history in the medieval and early modern Britain. Over 200 extant manuscripts of the 'Historia' survive today (Crick, 1989), and there were also a number of re-writings of Geoffrey's text in a variety of languages, including Latin, Anglo-Norman, Middle Welsh, Middle English, and Old Scots.

Trans/forming the Digital Humanities: Disciplinary Borders, Digital Frontiers

Friday, August 7, 2015 - 1:29pm
NeMLA 2016 - Hartford, Connecticut

Literary studies finds itself today at a double crossroads: as trans-formative digital humanities practice becomes increasingly accepted and visible in our research and curricula, so, even in more traditional methods of inquiry, has the unit of the "trans-" gained traction. Transnational, transatlantic, trans-periodic, transgender, and translational issues, to name but a few, increasingly structure and energize our readings and re-readings of literary texts. With this panel, we seek to move beyond a ruptural understanding of DH, with its underlying anxiety about disciplinary change, and to explore instead the potential continuities between humanities computing and existing methods.

Narratives of Forgetting and the Forgetting of Narratives - ICMS Kalamazoo 2016

Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:29pm
Rutgers Program in Medieval Studies

Working forward from Mary Carruthers' foundational work on the construction of memory structures, this panel seeks to understand medieval priorities of what to remember and what to forget. Its central goal is to explore the ways in which people created, consumed, and destroyed memories in order to communicate information and ideas. It responds to recent work on the manipulation of memories of the past, which was often involved in defining nationhood and group identity.

The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century Medicine (March 10-13, 2016)

Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:24pm
INCS 2016 (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies)

From sympathetic contagion to animal magnetism, nervous physiology to cell theory and germ theory, nineteenth-century medical theory and practice imagined human embodiment in open relation to the environmental, economic, religious, and political forces that shape historical experience. Often represented in both cultural and physiological terms, disease functioned as both sign and symptom of the irrevocable togetherness of mind and body, something to be combatted morally and technologically by prudence and enlightened reason.

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference 17th-19th August, 2016, University of British Columbia, Vancouver

Friday, August 7, 2015 - 11:40am
Romance in Medieval Britain Biennial conference

CFP: Romance in Medieval Britain Conference
17th-19th August, 2016
University of British Columbia, Vancouver

In the summer of 2016, the 15th Biennial Romance in Medieval Britain Conference will be hosted for the first time outside of the British Isles and Ireland. The Romance in Medieval Britain Conferences address the genre of Romance - understood broadly - in the multilingual literary landscape of the British Isles (and Ireland) during the Middle Ages.
The conference will feature plenary lectures by Suzanne Akbari (Toronto) and Corinne Saunders (Durham).

Adolescence in Film and Television (March 21-25, 2016; Proposals due October 1, 2015)

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 11:10pm
Popular Culture/American Culture Association

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture/American Culture Association Conference, to be held March 21-25, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.

Submissions that explore noteworthy coverage patterns, representations, and themes pertaining to the portrayal of adolescence/adolescents in film and television, during any historical era, are desired from scholars, educators, and students at all levels.

[UPDATE] Roundtable: "Crushed Silos: The Video Essay, Film, Writing, and Technology." NeMLA Hartford, CT

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 9:09pm
Rebecca Romanow/University of Rhode Island

Call for Papers

46th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 17-20, 2016
Hartford, CT

Roundtable: "Crushed Silos: The Video Essay, Film, Writing, and Technology."

The video essay represents an active place where the barriers between disciplines is merged and converging, and where pedagogical practices, as well as analytical examination, can take place across academic borders.

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?