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Creating and Un-creating the World in the Romantic Imagination

updated: 
Friday, April 8, 2016 - 3:02pm
SAMLA

The Romantics era was rife with social and economic shifts and imbalances as the Industrial Revolution brought destruction to the natural world and further stratification of the classes. In this increasingly dystopian climate, Romantic authors often sought an idyllic nature in which to imbue their utopian views; as such, the Romantic imagination became a mechanism through which authors essentially deconstructed the dystopian world and created the utopian imagination. Conversely, the Romantics sometimes deconstructed the utopian environment as a means to express the dystopian imagination.

Busting Boundaries: Unexpected Interdisciplinarity

updated: 
Friday, April 8, 2016 - 2:50pm
MMLA--special sessions

To those whose imaginative or scholarly inclinations chafe at fixed boundaries, the limitations they imply can inspire rebellion—that is an attempt to breach the boundaries and explore what lies beyond them. This session solicits papers that address literary topics using tools or approaches from disciplines that rarely meet in the same paper. For example, in what ways can mathematics provide a new or different interpretive lens for a literary text? Or what can poetry tell us about biology?

Submit a proposal of no more than 500 words by April 20.

Children's Literature and Adaptation (Proposed Panel at IRSCL Congress 2017)

updated: 
Friday, April 8, 2016 - 2:43pm
IRSCL (International Research Society for Children’s Literature) Congress 2017

In her second edition of Theory of Adaptation (2013), critic Linda Hutcheon presents a refreshingly new approach to adaptation, one that examines adaptive versions "laterally, not vertically" (xv), rather than one that privileges the source text. For Hutcheon, adaptation is both "process" and "product" of creation and reception, and the potential for change is endless, the life-giving possibilities of the adaptation infinite.

Special Issue: The Rising Tide of Climate Change Fiction (submissions due Feb. 10, 2017)

updated: 
Friday, April 8, 2016 - 2:41pm
Studies in the Novel

Studies in the Novel is currently seeking submissions for a special issue on "The Rising Tide of Climate Change Fiction," guest-edited by Stef Craps (Ghent University) and Rick Crownshaw (Goldsmiths, University of London), which will be published in spring 2018 as part of the journal's 50th anniversary volume.

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