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Connections: The Threads, Roots, and Pathways That Bind Us

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 9:31am
New Voices Graduate Student Conference

The New Voices Planning Committee is proud to announce that we are now accepting proposals for the 2016 New Voices Conference. This year's annual conference will be held February 4-6, 2016, at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia, and will feature papers, panels, workshops, creative writing readings, and a poster session.

Health: At the Interface 11th Global Conference

updated: 
Monday, August 24, 2015 - 8:49am
Inter-Disciplinary.Net

Health: At the Interface
11th Global Conference

Monday 14th March – Wednesday 16th March 2016
Budapest, Hungary

Te whenua, te whenua
Te oranga o te iwi

From the land, the land
comes the wellbeing of the people
(Maori song)

Call for Chapters: Gonzo Journalism Beyond Thompson

updated: 
Sunday, August 23, 2015 - 7:15pm
International Association for Literary Journalism Studies

CALL FOR CHAPTERS

Fear and Loathing Worldwide: Gonzo Journalism Beyond Hunter S. Thompson

With an aim to discover what "Gonzo" means in relation to literary journalism around the world, submissions are invited for an edited volume, projected to be published in 2016.

History, Memory, Grief: A 30th Air India Anniversary Conference, April 29-30, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 23, 2015 - 10:41am
Department of English and Cultural Studies, McMaster University.

History, Memory, Grief: A 30th Air India Anniversary Conference
John Douglas Taylor Conference, April 29-30, 2016

Department of English and Cultural Studies, McMaster University, Hamilton. Organizers: Chandrima Chakraborty, Nisha Eswaran, Sharifa Patel and Sarah Wahab

Unsettling Empire: Material Culture and the Global Economy in Nineteenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Sunday, August 23, 2015 - 10:27am
C19: March 17-20, 2016

In the nineteenth century, the question of the United States' growing status as a world power manifested itself not only through territorial expansionism, but also through the nation's economic ties to the rest of the globe. Whether through vociferous debates about tariff policies, or through competition with European powers over trade with Asia, or through consumers' metaphorical ownership of the world imagined through the possession of imported goods, nineteenth-century Americans were aware of the geopolitical implications of the United States' economic policies and entanglements.

Filling the Vacuum of Space and Time in Eighteenth Century - Due September 15

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 3:45pm
ASECS Panel - Brian Tatum

Scientific discoveries in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries led to a revolution in the epistemology of space and time as intellectuals such as Anna Barbauld and Thomas Wright expanded the scope of these concepts to infinite or nearly infinite regions. Proposals about the infinite size of the universe and the discovery of deep time created a vacuum that philosophers and writers quickly tried to fill. This led to expansion both in content and form of literary texts. This panel seeks to explore the connection between eighteenth-century scientific advancements and literature.

This panel welcomes papers interested in exploring these or related topics:

NeMLA panel: Translation and Spirituality. March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 12:57pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (2016 convention)

The study of translation systems as a central mode of inquiry into a culture's literary history has led to fascinating case studies in the growth, destabilization, and/or renewal of religious and political ideologies, particularly in non-European and postcolonial contexts. The use and visibility of translation as a transformative force (both in terms of politics and poetics) encourages us to conceive of translation as an endeavor with a distinctly spiritual dimension--an act that embodies the rhetoric of renewal, rebirth, and revival.

[UPDATE - Deadline 01/09/2015] Reading Risk in Contemporary U.S. Fiction and Culture

updated: 
Saturday, August 22, 2015 - 4:56am
A Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Colloquium, University of Birminham

Five days after 9/11, Republican Party activist James Pinkerton proclaimed that 'the World Trade Center has been destroyed, but this has also been a crushing defeat for irony, cynicism and hipness. Here in New York, the city that gave the world Seinfeld, Sex and the City and Studio 54, the victors now are sincerity, patriotism and earnestness' (Newsday, September 16th, 2001). Has Pinkerton's claim come true? If traditional values like sincerity, patriotism and earnestness are ascendant, what space is left for texts that risk to contest or query the status-quo? Should we abhor risk as the cause of the financial crash, or pine for risky artistic practices that might instigate change? Do we need the texts we study to be risky?

[REMINDER] Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 5:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

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