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7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference: Shakespearean Transformations, 8-11 September 2016

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:41am
University of Hull

7th Biennial British Shakespeare Association Conference

Shakespearean Transformations: Death, Life, and Afterlives

University of Hull, 8-11 September 2016

www.hull.ac.uk/bsa2016

Keynote speakers:

Susan Bassnett (University of Warwick)
Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex)
Michael Neill (University of Auckland)
Claudia Olk (Free University of Berlin)
Barrie Rutter (Northern Broadsides)
Tiffany Stern (University of Oxford)
Richard Wilson (Kingston University)

The Unsettling Politics of Nineteenth-Century Print, Abstract Deadline August 20

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:01am
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

While earlier centuries had witnessed the global spread of print, the nineteenth century contributed a new major chapter to the history of print in the Atlantic world, a chapter full of unsettling ironies. In this century, print became more accessible, since printing offices, owing to improved printing technologies, effective dissemination channels, and low-cost formats, were able to produce more efficiently. With print more accessible and affordable, printed material soon developed into a product of mass consumption that formed an integral part of everyday culture in the nineteenth century. Consequently, nineteenth-century print generated new audiences throughout the Atlantic world, such as working-class, black, and female readers.

'Facts and Fictions' - First Workshop of 'The Art of Identification' Network, University of Birmingham, Tuesday 13 October 2015

updated: 
Monday, July 20, 2015 - 2:36am
The Art of Identification

The Art of Identification network, funded by a networking grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) intends to bring together a range of academics and practitioners in order to explore the interconnections between practical techniques of human identification and the artistic representation of personal identity. The methods by which people have proved, or been assigned, their identities have varied over time – from Early Modern insignia to the contemporary strobe light of a retinal scanner – and the term 'identification' can also be taken to mean a number of things, including the determination of individual personhood via paperwork, bodily examination, verbal testimony, and digital recording.

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

[UPDATE] [SCMS 2016 CFP] Spaces of Spectatorship: Architectures of the Projected Image

updated: 
Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 2:00pm
Swagato Chakravorty / Yale University

The dispositif of the moving and projected image, defying its ossification under the weight of seventies-era apparatus theory, has returned to prominence. Screen architectures and moving-image installations have characterized a large-scale reconfiguration and reimagination of the dispositifs of cinema in the decades leading from the late twentieth into the early twenty-first century. The architecture of the moving and projected image has been at the center of this renewed focus on the dispositif.

[SCMS 2016 CFP]: Gay Porn and Barebacking **Due August 5th, 2015**

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 3:54pm
Kenneth T. Pinion

To what degree can we position historically the ongoing resurgence of barebacking or "breeding" in the gay porn industry? This panel seeks papers that historiographically and unabashedly interrogate the act of barebacking or "breeding" between queer men. Potential areas of excavation include: the visual depiction of barebacking in pre-1981 gay porn; alternatively, barebacking at the height of the AIDS crisis; current literary or filmic representations of barebacking; the relationship between barebacking and viral transmission in an industry-related context; the fetishization of barebacking in terms of "breeding"; the circulation of "breeding" videos over social media spaces; and so forth.

The Weird & the Southern Imaginary - Edited Collection

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 2:06pm
Travis Rozier / Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz; Bob Hodges / University of Washington

Keynote: The Weird & the Southern Imaginary will introduce the aesthetics and generic conventions of the Weird to cultural studies of the U.S. South and the region's local, hemispheric, and (inter)national connections. Contributions from literary critics, film and popular culture scholars, philosophers, and critical theorists will consider forms of the Weird in a range of texts (literature, art, film & television, comics, music) from, about, or resonant with conceptions of different South(s).

CFP Anthology on Girl Labor (non-western and new media)

updated: 
Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 1:45pm
Diana Anselmo-Sequeira

We are looking for original contributions for an anthology on the history of girl labor to be published by an American university press. We are seeking specifically for chapters that examine girl sex work and new media labor in non-western contexts.

Preferred topics include:

Girls and internet labor: blogging, gaming, lifestyle videos, micro-celebrities in non-western contexts

Girls and self-marketing in the web: seeking sponsorships, broadcasting one's image for profit

DIY cultures: Hello Kitty, "cute cultures," fashion, girls as producers of new consumer products

Gift cultures/ alternative markets/ hunter and gathering communities

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