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Working the Frame: Derrida, Harman, and the Language-Object Debate in the Humanities

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“How are you framing that?” It’s a frequent question we hear in the theoretically pluralistic world of the contemporary humanities. The question is seldom complimentary. As an interrogatory salvo, it frequently means: “What are the epistemological assumptions that undergird your conclusions?” The question is often meant to expose undertheorized terrain so that it can be made more intellectually robust with deeper thinking—or set aside as insufficient. Visual culture scholar John Tagg concisely defines framing, used in this sense, as “discursive constraint.” All framing, however, could arguably be seen as a problem of such constraint, regardless of how big or how refined the frame gets.

Digital Humanities and Narratives of Science, Technology, and Medicine

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Digital Humanities and Narratives of Science, Technology, and MedicineNeMLA 50th Anniversary Convention in Washington DC (March 21-24, 2019)

[SCMS 2019] Up to and Including Its Limits: Rethinking Experimental Cinema(s)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:27pm
Swagato Chakravorty / Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 25, 2018

This panel invites new positions from which to conceptualize postwar moving-image art, extending into the contemporary moment. Anglo-American and European scholarship on moving-image art through the 1960s and 70s has largely privileged formalist thinking. There is, as Jonathan Walley has written, a “general agreement…that avant-garde filmmakers of this period followed the trend within modernist art toward medium-specific purification: the reduction of the art object to the essential physical or material components of its medium.”[1] In recent years, however, we have witnessed a number of crucial revisionist interventions.

NeMLA Panel on James Baldwin's Global Legacy

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

NeMLA; Washington DC; March 21-24, 2019

 

Disillusioned by the racial issues in America, James Baldwin moved to France in 1948. Nine years later, however, he was drawn back after seeing a photograph of Dorothy Counts, a young black girl in Charlotte, North Carolina being harassed by a white mob as she entered an all-white high school. They threw rocks, spat on her, and told her to go back to where she came from. The image and situation were significant for Baldwin for various reasons. First, despite his attempts to avoid American racism, it had found him in Paris. Second, it was as if the taunts of "go back to where you came from" to Dorothy Counts drew Baldwin back "home" to document and confront American racism head on.

Women Writing Crime

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:27pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Women’s interest in crime, and violent crime in particular, has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Women now read more crime fiction and thrillers than men, are the primary audience for a number of popular true-crime podcasts (listeners of My Favorite Murder even refer to themselves as “Murderinos”), and increasingly enter fields of study that put them in close contact with the after-effects of violent crime, making up approximately 75% of current forensic science graduates.

Nemla 2019 Seminar "Queer Women: Reading and Writing in 19th & 20th Peninsular Spanish Literature"

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:28pm
Ana Isabel Simón-Alegre / Adelphi University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The topic of this seminar is the presence of the “chicas raras” in Modern Spanish literature, also known as “queer women” in English. Queer is the perfect conceptual framework to think about how Spanish authors explore feminist themes, such as discrimination or inequality using their narratives as a tool to examine tensions in female subjectivity. The concept queer includes the idea of gender dissidence that encompasses how female intellectuals experience sex, sexuality and, gender. Even if oftentimes these writers have difficulties conceptualizing these notions, they are perceptible in women narratives, especially through specific genres: autobiography, memoir, romance fiction and letters.

Moral Grammar in Nietzsche

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:14pm
Anthony Kosar / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In On the Genealogy of Morals Friedrich Nietzsche writes critically of just how bound his own native German was to more widespread religious-moral beliefs, such as those which take a fixed moral subject as the beginning and end of all we can know, thereby leaving out one’s own doing as secondary to who one is. Nietzsche writes: “But there is no ‘being’ behind doing[…] – doing is everything” (GM I, 13) and thus suggests that the underlying grammar of the languages he himself knew well – all of which acknowledge if only implicitly an objective difference between subject and verb, doer and deed – were in fact wrong and had to be thought through from the ground up. One might yet take Nietzsche to task on this provocation.

Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:56pm
Letizia Modena, Vanderbilt University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Dear Colleagues,

Please consider submitting a proposal to the following session for the NeMLA 2019 Convention in Washington, DC (March 21-24).

 Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

NEMLA 2019: Decolonial Approaches to Literature, Film and Visual Arts

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:39pm
Badreddine Ben Othman and Danielle Schwartz (Binghamton University SUNY)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

According to Walter Mignolo (2013, 2007), the triumphal narrative of modernity is inseparable from coloniality, or the logic of domination, exploitation, and oppression. While modernity builds itself on a triumphal narrative of civilization, progress, and development, modernity hides its darker side, “coloniality.” “Modernity/coloniality” shows that while modernity materializes in the rhetoric of salvation, modernity, capitalism, and coloniality are inseparable aspects yoked to authority and the control of economy. The first conceptualizations of modernity/coloniality/decoloniality, launched by Quijano (2007), focus on economic-political dimensions and the question of knowledge and racism.

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