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international conferences

Science Fiction, Radical Visioning, and Social Justice (Panel for ICFA 40)

updated: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 10:58am
Karina A. Vado
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 19, 2018

Panel for the International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA) 40: Politics and Conflict

Orlando, Florida

March 13-16, 2019

Extended abstract submission deadline: Friday, October, 19th.

Hoccleve at Kalamazoo, 2019: Identity in Public Contexts: Hoccleve and Langland in Conversation

updated: 
Monday, September 10, 2018 - 9:40am
Paper Session: 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, 9-12 May 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

While scholars often note that Hoccleve’s and Langland’s poetic personae each make the other more understandable, rarely have these poets been analyzed together in great detail. Thus, with this session, The International Hoccleve Society and International Piers Plowman Society seek to provide an occasion to do so. The Societies invite paper submissions that examine the ways interpretive discourses around Hoccleve’s and Langland’s works overlap and intersect.

ACLA2019: Transnationalizing Eastern European Memorial Cultures

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:46am
Eneken Laanes, Tallinn University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

ACLA seminar: Transnationalizing Eastern European Memorial Cultures

7-10 March 2019, Georgetown University in Washington, DC 

Seminar organizers:

Dr Eneken Laanes, Tallinn University, Estonia

Prof Anja Tippner, Univeristy of Hamburg, Germany

The Legacies of Ursula K. Le Guin: Science, Fiction and Ethics for the Anthropocene

updated: 
Saturday, September 8, 2018 - 3:40am
Sorbonne Nouvelle
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 15, 2018

Call for papers

 

The Legacies of Ursula K. Le Guin: Science, Fiction and Ethics for the Anthropocene

 

International conference in Paris · June 19 - 21, 2019

 

École polytechnique / Sorbonne Nouvelle

 

 

 

Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings. Resistance and change often begin in art, and very often in our art, the art of words.

–Ursula K. Le Guin

 

 

2018 Future Humanities International Conference Investigating Future Territories: Utopias, Dystopias, and Heterotopias

updated: 
Tuesday, October 2, 2018 - 7:35am
The Institute of the Future Humanities (November 10, Department of English, Chung-Ang University, South Korea)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 20, 2018

2018 Future Humanities International Conference

 

Investigating Future Territories: Utopias, Dystopias, and Heterotopias

 

 

Deadline for submissions: 

October 20, 2018

 

Full name / Name of organization: 

The Institute of the Future Humanities (November 10, Department of English, Chung-Ang University, South Korea)

 

Conference Date: November 10

 

NeMLA 2019: Classical Metanarrative, Aesthetics, and the Creative Process

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018


Ancient Greece and Rome have had a profound influence on subsequent literature. While our analyses of Classical literature, philosophy, and art often focus on the characters and stories they depict, these works often served as a means to examine the aesthetic process itself. One of the earliest surviving Greek texts, Homer’s Iliad, goes so far as to depict its protagonist Achilles singing of ancient heroes and strumming his lyre as a means of determining the effect of being remembered in epic.

NeMLA 2019: Reading and Writing the Classics in Antiquity and Beyond

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Claire Sommers/The Graduate Center, CUNY & NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

 

The literature of ancient Greece and Rome has survived for thousands of years. As a result, Classical literary and philosophical works have served as a profound influence on the writings of subsequent time periods. Indeed, in many subsequent time periods, the ability to quote from Classical sources became a marker of status and intelligence. However, many works of ancient Greece and Rome are not wholly original, but in fact flaunt their use of source materials, citing earlier versions of myths and epics. Often, Classical and post-Classical authors would modify their source materials, and we are able to see them not only as writers, but as readers in their own right.

Women and the Natural World in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 7, 2018 - 9:24am
Olivia Colquitt / Leeds IMC 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 24, 2018

This series of sessions proposes to explore the multifarious relationships between women and the natural world in medieval literature. We invite abstracts for papers on medieval texts of any language, genre, and period across the global Middle Ages. We particularly welcome submissions from doctoral candidates, early career researchers, and independent scholars. After receiving all submissions, papers will be organised into a number of linked sessions focussing on more specific topics within the overarching theme of women and the natural world.

Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

ACLA 2019: The Infinite Freak: Global (De)constructing of Aberration

updated: 
Thursday, September 6, 2018 - 9:29am
ACLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

The amount of scholarly literature devoted to the subject of “freaks” is grossly inconsistent with the volume of its uses. The term bears notoriously obscure and contradictory meaning, simultaneously natural and unnatural, common and uncommon, derogatory and complimentary, mythic and empirically determined, strange and familiar, cosmic and socially constructed. In speaking about “freaks” the scholar might feel compelled to substitute the term with one of its many aliases, such as “otherness,” “abnormal,” “alterity,” “anomalous,” or “divergent” but these synonyms impose limits exceeded by the uses of the term, “freaks.” This panel engages in the multiplicity of meaning, condition and consequence inherent in the subject of freaks.

ACLA 2019: "New Comparative Work on the Eurasian and African Diasporas"

updated: 
Thursday, September 6, 2018 - 9:25am
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 20, 2018

This seminar convenes scholars working at the intersection of Black diaspora studies and Slavic studies broadly construed—including the Russian Empire and former Soviet Union, Central and Southeast Europe, and Central Asia. Earlier scholarship in Afro-Russian and/or Afro-Eurasian studies has emphasized crucial connections between these two fields, including: the parallel histories of bondage and emancipation in the United States and Russian Empire; the representation of “folk” culture in Russian and African American literatures; Black artists’ and writers’ sojourns in the Soviet Union; and the influence of Russian thought and literature on African diasporic writers in the twentieth century.

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