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Faulkner and Money, July 23-27, 2017

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 4:49pm
Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha conference (Jay Watson, director)

To gain a fuller understanding of William Faulkner's literary career and fictional oeuvre, a reader could do worse than to follow the proverbial money. Faulkner delighted in the intricate maneuverings of financial transactions, from poker wagers, horse trades, and auctions to the seismic convolutions of the New York Cotton Exchange. Moreover, whether boiling the pot with magazine stories, scraping by on advances from his publishers, flush with cash from Hollywood screenwriting labors, or basking in financial security in the wake of the Nobel Prize, Faulkner was at every moment of his personal and professional life thoroughly inscribed within the economic forces and circumstances of his era.

The Destruction of Art (Past and Present)

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 3:59pm
Rea Bethel Art History Department, College of Visual and Performing Arts University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

International Undergraduate Student Symposium
Art History Department, College of Visual and Performing Arts
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
April 14, 2016
Claire T. Carney Library, the Grand Reading Room

Type: Call for Papers
Proposal Submission Date: March 15, 2016
Conference Date: April 14, 2016
Conference Venue: Claire T. Carney Library, the Grand Reading Room, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Subject Fields:
Architectural History, Cultural Studies, Heritage and Museum studies, Art History, Media & Visual Culture Studies, Censorship Studies, and studio art practices with focus on issues of destruction and eradication of material culture

Special Session of the 2016 PAMLA Conference November 11-13, 2016: Back from the Dead: Language Revival as Arc

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 12:51pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

Recent scholarship on the "archive" as well as that on "cultural memory" has focused on the role of language as both mechanism and metaphor. This session seeks to further purse these lines of investigation and find points of intersection by focusing on the revival of extinct or near-extinct languages as a type of archival reconstruction grounded in cultural memory. Papers are sought that explore how and why language revival movements occur in relation to issues of identity formation (both personal and communal) and the relationship of this phenomenon to the notion of cultural preservation vis-a-vi cultural memory and archive.

UPDATE: Deadline Extended to March 1st. Teaching Nineteenth- Century Literature and Gender in the Twenty-First Century Classroom

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 12:19pm
Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies-- special issue

Submission Date:
Please send articles of 5,000-8,000 word articles to both lkarpenk@carrollu.edu and ldietz@depaul.edu by MARCH 1st 2016 (earlier submissions highly encouraged.) Articles should be in MLA format and not be under consideration at any other journal. Any queries or letters of interest are welcome and should be sent to both the e-mail addresses listed above.

SPECTRUM

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 9:03am
University of Dhaka

Spectrum, a refereed journal published by the Department of English, University of Dhaka, seeks submissions of scholarly articles, book reviews, translations and creative pieces for its forthcoming issue. Spectrum welcomes contributions by teachers, alumni and current students of English Literature, ELT and Linguistics. Essays on any literary period and any aspect of literature and language, book reviews, as well as short stories, poems and translations are sought. Submissions should not have been previously published, or be under consideration for publication elsewhere. Only articles/creative pieces recommended by reviewers will be accepted for publication.

Orphan Identities

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 4:41am
University of Portsmouth

Orphan Identities Symposium: Call for Papers

Keynote Speakers: Laura Peters and David Floyd

In 1975, Nina Auerbach commented: "Although we are now 'all orphans,' alone and free and dispossessed of our past, we yearn for origins, for cultural continuity. In our continual achievement of paradox, we have made of the orphan himself our archetypal and perhaps only ancestor" (416).

Teaching Central/Eastern Europe And Its Communist Past

updated: 
Saturday, February 6, 2016 - 12:30am
Modern Language Association (MLA) Philadelphia, PA, January 2017

Central/Eastern Europe's cultural visibility has increased since the 1989 Fall of the Berlin Wall and then in 2009 when Romanian-born German writer Herta Müller received the Nobel Prize in Literature. In light of this new visibility, how are Central/Eastern European cultures and history being taught, both within and outside the region? What has changed in the ways these countries have contributed to the understanding of the cultural configuration of the region or the continent? What should educators include in various curricula? How do we teach the communist period to new generations and/or to the West and the rest of the world?

Climate Change: Views from the Humanities (a virtual conference: May 3-24)

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 9:05pm
UC Santa Barbara Environmental Humanities Initiative

Climate Change: Views from the Humanities
Sponsored by the Environmental Humanities Initiative (EHI) at UC Santa Barbara
A virtual conference held online from May 3-24, 2016
Abstracts due March 1, 2016

We welcome papers dealing with climate change from all fields of the humanities, as well as the social sciences. As our goal is to encourage the cross pollination of ideas across a broad range of disciplines on what may well be the most important issue of this century, we are looking for any paper that innovatively deals with climate change.

MLA 2017 Special Session: Nonhumans in Twentieth-Century British Children's Fiction

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 6:03pm
Shun Yin Kiang/Bunker Hill Community College

Animals, fairies, and toys, and their relation to concepts of childhood or the child, fill the pages of British children's fiction in the twentieth-century. While childhood as often portrayed in the Victorian period was that of "vulnerability and victimization . . . a comparatively brief, difficult step on the path to adulthood" (Gavin and Humphries), literary representations of childhood from the Edwardian period onward focus less on the child's proper relation to the adult world, and more on cultivating affective ties with a host of nonhuman others. E. Nesbit's "Five Children and It," J. M.

[UPDATE] Inaugural Communication & Media Studies Conference

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 5:27pm
Common Ground Publishing

CALL FOR PAPERS

Proposals for paper presentations, workshops, posters, or colloquia are invited for the Inaugural Communication & Media Studies Conference held at the University Center Chicago, Chicago, USA, 15-16 September 2016. Proposals are invited that address communication and media studies through one of the following categories:

Theme 1: Media Theory
Theme 2: Media Technologies and Processes
Theme 3: Media Business
Theme 4: Media Literacies
Theme 5: Media Cultures

2016 SPECIAL FOCUS: 'Communication and Media Studies: After the Internet?'

VIRTUAL PRESENTATIONS

Trans(form): New Insights and New Directions: April 9, 2016

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 4:29pm
10th Annual University of Rhode Island Graduate Student Conference

The prefix trans- implies movement and change: between states, among groups and disciplines, across divides, from one way of being or knowing to another. This conference invites graduate students to present research that approaches the conference theme from a variety of perspectives. In the conference sessions, participants have the opportunity to exchange ideas across disciplines in a transdisciplinary setting. Transdisciplinarity allows us to encounter new perspectives – new ways of thinking – that can transform our research by introducing new insights and new directions.

We encourage submissions from all disciplines and universities, including but not limited to:

Comparative Medievalisms

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 4:07pm
Comparative Medieval Forum of the MLA (Philadelphia, January 2017)

What cultural work does the medieval past perform in global media and cultural productions—textual, visual, musical, performative, cinematic? Literary scholars and theorists have increasingly explored the varied forms that "medievalism" takes in contexts around the globe.

Journal of Creative Writing Studies -- Now Open for Submissions

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 4:04pm
Journal of Creative Writing Studies

Journal of Creative Writing Studies is a peer reviewed, open access journal. We publish research that examines the teaching, practice, theory, and history of creative writing. This scholarship makes use of theories and methodologies from a variety of disciplines. We believe knowledge is best constructed in an open conversation among diverse voices and multiple perspectives. Therefore, our editors actively seek to include work from marginalized and underrepresented scholars. Journal of Creative Writing Studies is dedicated to the idea that humanities research ought to be accessible and available to all.

MLA Special Session Proposal: Episteme of Inequality: Studying Postcolonial Wealth Formation

updated: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 3:37pm
MLA 2017 (in Philadelphia)

MLA Special Session:

Papers trace economic wealth, poverty, and reparation across particular colonial histories through literary texts, historical documentation, and other forms of cultural production. These are ethical readings touching the violence of capital across the _longue durée_ of modernity. Geographies under consideration include any part of the world impacted by European imperialism during the modern era. Organized by Aparajita De of UDC and Maureen Fadem of CUNY.

200-word abstract + Bio by 03/15/16 to: Aparajita De (de.aparajita@gmail.com) and Maureen Fadem (meruprecht@yahoo.com)

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